The Atlas of New Librarianship An essential guide to a librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning Libraries have existed for millennia but today the library field is searching for solid footing in

  • Title: The Atlas of New Librarianship
  • Author: R. David Lankes
  • ISBN: 9780262015097
  • Page: 358
  • Format: Hardcover
  • An essential guide to a librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning.Libraries have existed for millennia, but today the library field is searching for solid footing in an increasingly fragmented and increasingly digital information environment What is librarianship when it is unmoored from cataloging, books, buildings, and committees InAn essential guide to a librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning.Libraries have existed for millennia, but today the library field is searching for solid footing in an increasingly fragmented and increasingly digital information environment What is librarianship when it is unmoored from cataloging, books, buildings, and committees In The Atlas of New Librarianship, R David Lankes offers a guide to this new landscape for practitioners He describes a new librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning and he suggests a new mission for librarians to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities The vision for a new librarianship must go beyond finding library related uses for information technology and the Internet it must provide a durable foundation for the field Lankes recasts librarianship and library practice using the fundamental concept that knowledge is created though conversation New librarians approach their work as facilitators of conversation they seek to enrich, capture, store, and disseminate the conversations of their communities To help librarians navigate this new terrain, Lankes offers a map, a visual representation of the field that can guide explorations of it than 140 Agreements, statements about librarianship that range from relevant theories to examples of practice and Threads, arrangements of Agreements to explain key ideas, covering such topics as conceptual foundations and skills and values Agreement Supplements at the end of the book offer expanded discussions Although it touches on theory as well as practice, the Atlas is meant to be a tool textbook, conversation guide, platform for social networking, and call to action.Copublished with the Association of College Research Libraries.

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      Published :2018-08-13T08:11:35+00:00

    One thought on “The Atlas of New Librarianship”

    1. This is one of those 3-star reviews where the stars mean nothing, because I'm just averaging highs and lows. Some was so good, like wanting to rejigger library education. Some was so nonsensical, like ditching artifacts. A lot was contradictory to reality, especially this insistence on demoting artifacts in a world where people ask me EVERY DAY where the books are. Some was thoughtful and insightful, like his deeply felt desire to improve conversations between and among librarians and patrons. T [...]

    2. It is the textbook for librarians today - our collection is our community (not books) and the improvement of society is our goal.

    3. Hace unos días, un compañero me dijo que era una pena que estuviese leyendo este libro porque no serviría para nada si algún día ejercía la profesión; lejos de entristecerme, me cabreó tanto que ahora solo quiero dedicarme a ella para mostrar que, a pesar del entorno conservador en el que lo haría, hay posibilidad de entrar en el siglo XXI con mucha sangre, sudor y lágrimas.El autor establece desde el principio del libro que la misión de los bibliotecarios es mejorar la sociedad facil [...]

    4. I have been reading many of Lankes posts and presentations and have really enjoyed them. I am very interested in Lankes voice and his talks and presentations always hold my attention. He seems to be right on the pulse of what libraries should be doing and where they are going. When I saw that he was publishing a book called The Atlas of New Librarianship, I knew I had to get it. I was pleasantly surprised that the book takes a general approach that would put any library student or anyone interes [...]

    5. This book is hard to rate because it had many good qualities and also many bad qualities. I did not care for the Atlas format. I think I would have rather read a narrative. I found the images tedious and ineffective; however the author made many great points throughout the text. I think this book serves as a great way to keep the collective dialog running among librarians and library professionals.

    6. So far this book is amazing. Just like Lankes vlogs, talks, and blogs he sets out simple yet profound statements that make you think. I was joking with another librarian about how we practically transcribe everything he is saying! Lankes is a brilliant wordsmith--no extraneous verbage. This book is really an atlas. After the short, pithy intro it is all atlas. I am currently learning how to use the atlas portion. I will update my review once I have done that and have a better idea of what they c [...]

    7. While I confess to not reading the Atlas of Librarianship from cover to cover, I'm not sure author David Lankes intended it to be. It is better to dip in and out of it and give yourself room to digest and cogitate on each new discovery along the way.

    8. This tome will encourage all librarians to embrace a new era for libraries. Think community-learning-enrichment. Yes, all the things we usually think of, and though many of us know libraries are and have been more than books, this offers substantial guiding principles and inspiration. A must read.

    9. I don't think I will ever be fully "done" with this book - I am, however, done with the portions I had to read for the New Librarianship Master Class I took in July. I'm hoping to read some of the other sections at a later date, but from what I was able to read for class, I was very impressed.

    10. I just finished reading Michael Gorman's "Our enduring values revisited : librarianship in an ever-changing world" and wanted to return to Lanke's "Atlas" to compare the two. I had originally purchased this book back in 2013 in order to take his MOOC, which I couldn't finish as work was far too hectic. I have read a number of reviews, with particular interest in the mediocre ones. I believe that I tend to agree with Gorman (and the critical reviewers) that preserving artifacts, the human record, [...]

    11. As this is a somewhat difficult book (although an excellent read for librarians, new or seasoned!!) to describe, I am going to quote what is listed at : “David Lankes “The Atlas of New Librarianship” describes a new librarianship based not on books and artifacts but on knowledge and learning; and he suggests a new mission for librarians: to improve society through facilitating knowledge creation in their communities. The vision for a new librarianship must go beyond finding library-related [...]

    12. So far this book is living up to my hopes. I think it would be useful on any librarian's professional development shelf in their home library. It uses "soaring language" to help support and renew librarians spirits. I got it by mail from the Multnomah County library to see if I should buy it, and I think I will."This atlas is written for you. It seeks to bolster the defiant who stand bravely before the crushing weight of the status quo and seeks to give hope to those silenced by the chorus of th [...]

    13. The author of this book recently taught a massive open online course with this book as the central textbook. I started the MOOC, but only made it about halfway through before busyness with life and work caused me to drop out since finishing it was at the bottom of my priority list. I did stay in the course long enough to complete the reading assignments in this book though. The book centers around Lankes idea that librarians need to evolve from dealing with many of the things that have been hist [...]

    14. I always wondered what librarians study or do when they're not helping us find books. The Atlas of New Librarianship changes the way I think of libraries. Access to books (referred to as artifacts) are important to me, but lending books and maintaining collections are just part of librarians' many responsibilities. I also learned information science isn't the same thing as library science. The book is more of a mission statement and guide for library professionals on serving their communities. I [...]

    15. Though Lankes provides a lot of valuable insight into librarianship, his epistemological constructivism is simply incoherent, inconsistent, and untenable. I'll post a longer analysis on my blog (Sense and Reference), but the short version is that (1) we can adopt most of his recommendations without adopting his Conversation Theory, (2) his treatment of knowledge (the core of new librarianship) is incoherent, inconsistent, and based in fallacious reasoning, and (3) his theory of knowledge is more [...]

    16. read the first few chapters and watched some online videos for the online course. Interesting concepts about the librarian as a knowledge creator -- responsible for creating and maintaining the knowledge of communities by working with others to setup the tools, environment, and training to make this happen. It sounds fun in theory, and would require more social skills on the part of the librarian. It reminds me a little bit of the participatory art movement, because this theory requires the libr [...]

    17. I really enjoy Lankes, his vision, and thoughts of the profession. I am only giving this 3 stars because Lankes is a much better orator than a in book format. I think the book version doesn't do his lectures justice. I think the content is pretty expansive and could use some editing. I enjoyed the read, and he has a really funny sense of humor. Do check out his website. His lectures are also thought provoking and his passion comes across even more. So invigorating.

    18. So far, I'm puzzled. I'm a theoretical thinker, and have been in this field for 35 years, but I'm puzzled. It puts me in mind of a conversation I had with Eugene Garfield (founder of ISI) many years ago, after which I decided he was either brilliant, or insane.But, I will reserve judgment until I finish it.

    19. Somehow both two stars and four stars. I found the reading quite dense by while I didn't agree with Lankes in everything I thought he presented a nicely broad range of ideas of how libraries can evolve their services and work with their communities.

    20. This was an effort but well worth it. It was slightly difficult to read and should be treated more like a reference book than anything else. Those not in the library trade might not find it as interesting but I think it's still pretty fascinating on a few levels.

    21. Whew! A lot of very useful information and interesting discussion points. Hard to get through all at once. This is definitely one of those books where you get more out of it every time you read it.

    22. I read this book as part of the New Librarianship MOOC! It is a definitive must-read for every librarian in opening up new horizons for librarianship in the future!

    23. Some very thought provoking writing on librarianship. As with all Lankes, can go over the top at times but in the end it always inspires further thought and new directions.

    24. Thought provoking book that challenges us to think more broadly about the mission of librarianship. I'm with him most of the way. (But the complicated diagrams didn't help.)

    25. I didn't agree with all of it, but it got me to react and started a bit of introspection. That was worth the 3rd star.

    26. Lots of interesting material in this book (I read all the threads, but not all the accompanying material). I'm feeling a little left behind in my profession.

    27. This was thought-provoking, but not the be-all, end-all I was hoping for. Still, there's a wealth of useful thought and theory here for future discussion.

    28. I loved this book! So much to think about. I'm thinking of buying a copy so that I can reflect further, and I don't buy books lightly.

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