Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor How I Discovered the Hidden Treasures of the Catholic Church Tens of thousands of American adults join the Catholic Church every year Why What is it that attracts them to Catholicism In Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor Allen Hunt unveils the treasures of Ca

  • Title: Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor: How I Discovered the Hidden Treasures of the Catholic Church
  • Author: Allen R. Hunt
  • ISBN: 9780984131839
  • Page: 154
  • Format: Paperback
  • Tens of thousands of American adults join the Catholic Church every year Why What is it that attracts them to Catholicism In Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor, Allen Hunt unveils the treasures of Catholicism that many life long Catholics are simply unaware of At the same time he demonstrates the genius of Catholicism and encourages us to move beyond taking our faithTens of thousands of American adults join the Catholic Church every year Why What is it that attracts them to Catholicism In Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor, Allen Hunt unveils the treasures of Catholicism that many life long Catholics are simply unaware of At the same time he demonstrates the genius of Catholicism and encourages us to move beyond taking our faith for granted With a personal touch that is profound and disarming, Hunt takes his readers on a journey that is sure to change the way we experience our faith At a time when so many are disillusioned about where the Catholic Church is and where it is going, Allen Hunt brilliantly reminds us that personal holiness is the key to the bigger future God wants to leads us to both as individuals and together as a Church.

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      Published :2018-08-08T09:06:59+00:00

    One thought on “Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor: How I Discovered the Hidden Treasures of the Catholic Church”

    1. Every Christian should read this book. (Yes, EVERY CHRISTIAN. Not just Catholics, all Christians.)In "Confessions of a Mega Church Pastor," Allen Hunt describes his journey from leading a large Methodist congregation to his conversion to Catholicism. He explains in detail each point that ultimately lead him to the Catholic Church, not only why each point led him TO the Church, but how each point ultimately showed him how the ONLY answer was the Church. As a Catholic, I went into this thinking, " [...]

    2. What a powerful book! I could not put it down; the author kept me eager to rediscover what I thought I already knew everything about. I would highly recommend it to anyone, regardless of your background or beliefs because it contains so much valuable information.

    3. I absolutely loved this book! A former Methodist pastor, Hunt likens the Catholic Church to an old house with treasures hidden in every room as he describes his conversion. True, if you're looking for deep theology you won't find it here, but that's not the point of this book. If that's what you're looking for, read Scott Hahn or the Catechism. Instead Hunt gives a brief explanation of the six "treasures" that drew him to the church. As a convert (and former Methodist) I completely identified wi [...]

    4. This felt like a less Scripture-heavy version of Rome Sweet Home: Our Journey to Catholicism. Hunt was a Methodist pastor of a congregation of thousands, but once he started digging deeper into church authority, history, and the truths of Catholicism, he was convinced that he had to leave. This book is much more easily approachable than Rome Sweet Home, although it also has Scripture passages to support Hunt's journey. I found myself agreeing with Hunt's discovery and reasoning throughout. This [...]

    5. I first heard of this book listening to Allen Hunt's radio program, where he discusses "Not right and left, but what is right and wrong." I have always wondered what the name of the church he left. Well the final pages of this book tells. It was Mount Pisgah, a United Methodist Church. He had a congregation of over 15,000. While he makes some good points in this book, I still do not believe the Catholic Church is the true church. It is surprising how many things the Catholic Church has in common [...]

    6. WOW! Easy read. Allen Hunt's epiphany and journey to Catholic convert makes you stop and think - - and appreciate this incredible gift that Christ gives to us. Now it is up to us as Catholic Christians to honor that gift and preserve our authentic Catholic heritage. "This Old House" metaphor that Hunt uses enables you to view the sacraments of the Catholic Church with childlike eyes and wonder. Enjoy!

    7. People talk about the decline of religion, and that is worrisome for a society. And then people note those leaving the Catholic Church. But, my great uncle Tony, who in his nineties was the world's oldest alter boy and a sharp thinker noted - priests who leave the Catholic Church leave over social issues, however, Protestant ministers who come into the Catholic Church come because of the theology and truth. Similar to Scott Hahn's spiritual autobiographical "Rome Sweet Home", here is another Pro [...]

    8. Allen Hunt was a successful Methodist minister, pastor of one of the largest Methodist congregations in the nation. But he wasn’t comfortable in that role and felt like a hypocrite. In this book, he describes the faith journey that ultimately resulted in his conversion to Catholicism. This account provides a detailed look at what distinguishes the Catholic Church from other Christian denominations, and why the author found these elements of Catholicism so compelling. While this is a personal s [...]

    9. Allen Hunt provides an authentic and honest display of his conversion to the Church. Hunt's honesty and viewpoints are so well detailed throughout this entire book- alleviating the reader of wondering what Hunt was feeling. My favorite aspects of this book were Hunt's perspective on the Oneness of the Catholic faith- that all over the world on any given day of the week thousands upon thousands of Catholics are sharing in the same Eucharist and divine liturgy. Another aspect of the book that I fo [...]

    10. The literary style of this book is very trying. It is meant to be a teaching tool for an RCIA class, I think, but as a regular read it is much too episodic and runs that metaphor of the house into the ground. The Bedroom comparison is truly unfortunate. Not the editorial hand I would have gone with but the book is very true to this pastor's voice and another sort of pulpit. I guess some folks find it easy to digest this way, so well and good. I don't agree however with other critics that say if [...]

    11. Allen Hunt's story is compelling: he was the pastor of the largest mega church in the Southeast (the third largest in the nation) and was doing incredibly well when he finally gave all that up to become a Catholic. He crafts a great story comparing the Catholic Church to a very old house full of different gifts you don't realize are there. This is a good read comparing Catholicism and Protestantism from someone who has been a great scholar of both, told as a great preacher might in a way that al [...]

    12. I thought the author had some persuavive arguments for establishing the Catholic Church as the church Christ founded. Much of it was centered around the Eucharist, & rightfully so. Many of the points I had never thought of due to the position of being a cradle Catholic. I think you need to be on the outside looking in to give it a new perspective.One of my biggest complaints would be, he seems to repeat quite often. I believe there are times to wise & effective to reiterate examples, ide [...]

    13. This was recommended to me by a former school teacher that I see in (Catholic) mass each morning. I still don't know much about Methodists, even after reading this, but it was a good book related to conversion. Jerry, the man who lent the book to me, told me that pages 100 to 110 were the most important pages in the book. Although all of it is important, these pages in particular describe the tenets of the Catholic Church and how rock solid the foundation remains even in the midst of today's soc [...]

    14. Excellent read. I thoroughly enjoyed all of the chapters but I was especially touched by the "Front Porch" chapter. I read John 17:20-23 in a whole new way. It was always God's intention that we always be one Christian family, i.e. One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church.I also took the author's advice and spent some time gazing at Salvadori Dali's painting titled "The Sacrament of the Last Supper." This is a very Catholic representation of the supper pointing the way to God's presence in the E [...]

    15. This was an interesting book because I liked reading about the authors thought process, but it was "just ok" because of the writing. He is not a very good writer. Matthew Kelly repeats himself in Rediscovering Catholicism because he's reiterating his point, Allen Hunt repeats himself because he's trying to remind himself what his point was. The biggest problem was how the book was organized: he uses a metaphor of the Church as an old house. It's pretty big stretch for most of the book, and it wa [...]

    16. I liked the book in general but what I was looking for were those compelling words I could share with someone who wants to know more about the Catholic Church and why they should consider joining the faith. There wasn't enough of that type of content that I would share this book with someone in that situation. Maybe if the story had ended with his wife converting as well, it would have packed a bigger punch.

    17. This book was an interesting read regarding the conversion of a Methodist pastor to a Roman Catholic. I didn't agree with everything he shared, but his message was of peace and understanding. As someone who has volunteered with RCIA, I truly enjoy the engagement and wonder of converts. I've always noticed they tend to have more "fire in their belly" about their faith. I'm not saying that cradle Catholics do not have this, however I do notice trends in behavior. It was a great little book.

    18. This was a quick, and yet thoughtful and deep read. I really enjoyed the analogy of looking at the Catholic church like an old house. Mr. Hunt, a 5th generation Methodist Pastor, with doctoral degrees in theology, describes his 15 year conversion. The scripture references are excellent, his historical perspectives are accurate, and really makes you understand why non- Christians are confused by 33,000 versions of Christianity!! Loved it.

    19. This book is more a conversion story than an apologetic. Allen Hunt comes to the Catholic Church from the Methodist tradition, and in large part he seems to have been inspired by the many Catholic friends that have been a part of his life. However, Allen's conversion is focused on following the truth to the best of his ability--as it should be for anyone who takes their faith seriously.

    20. This book turned out to be better than I thought it would be. As a practicing Catholic it reinforced for me the Church's teaching that it is the church Jesus founded. The author's arguments are compelling. His conversion story is an example of the Holy Spirit working. I encourage non-Catholics to read this book too.

    21. This book is an excellent choice for anyone slightly interested in Catholicism, even for those who believe that they are against the Catholic Church's teachings. Hunt does a phenomenal job at explaining how we as Catholics believe and know that we are the fulfillment of Jesus Christ's Church. We are the fulfillment of the Oneness that Jesus prays for in John 17!

    22. I received this book as a gift from our church on Christmas Day. I wasn't thrilled to start reading it, but once I began, I really enjoyed it. As a convert to Catholicism, I really enjoyed the authors point of view and descriptions about the importance of the Eucharist and praying with saints. This was a great book to start the new year.

    23. This is a great little book. If you ever want to know just WHY Catholics believe what they do, this is the answer. Author Allen Hunt was at the top of his game as Methodist Pastor of a 'mega church', when he realized that he was going to convert to Catholicism. A chronicle of his first inklings to the full commitment he finally made.

    24. Story of a Protestant mega-church pastor's journey to becoming a Catholic. While I don't think, I would ever become a Catholic, it was interesting to read, the steps that took place over decades, that led Hunt to step down as a pastor and join a different church all together from his, and he seems to be honest and transparent throughout the entire book.

    25. Good review/teaching on why we are Catholic:God Gives Himself to us in the EucharistThe One Truth - not 33,000Spiritual Family - SaintsA Holy Father on earthThe Catechism - One AuthorityGod reveals himself to us in MiraclesThe Mystery of our FaithWe serve God by serving othersOur church is universal - we can attend the same mass anywhere and everywhere in the world

    26. This was a fast read and very interesting. The author does have a tendency to display the zeal of a new convert and tends to talk as if the Roman Catholic Church is the only true church and that may turn off non catholic readers. Despite that he was very sincere and made me re evaluate my catholic faith.

    27. This is such a great book to read. It fully describes why Catholics believe in what they do through the eyes of someone who was born and raised Protestant (Methodist to be exact). The final pages were also a nice treat, especially the pilgrimage to the Vatican tip. A must-read.

    28. The author is rather pretentious and boastful, especially when speaking about his wife. He claims she has the characteristics of a mystic, but any true mystic would not speak about his/her visions out loud in public. Not one of my favorite books.

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