The Triumph of Politics Why the Reagan Revolution Failed OverviewThe controversial bestseller on the failure of the Reagan Revolution Editorial Review Library JournalThis memoir is a bitter review of Stockman s years in the Reagan Administration It is a boo

  • Title: The Triumph of Politics: Why the Reagan Revolution Failed
  • Author: David A. Stockman
  • ISBN: 9780060155605
  • Page: 171
  • Format: Hardcover
  • OverviewThe controversial bestseller on the failure of the Reagan Revolution.Editorial Review Library JournalThis memoir is a bitter review of Stockman s years in the Reagan Administration It is a book with few heroes and many fools The author claims naivete as his excuse Although the narrative is somewhat confusing, overall, its backstage view of policymaking leaves oOverviewThe controversial bestseller on the failure of the Reagan Revolution.Editorial Review Library JournalThis memoir is a bitter review of Stockman s years in the Reagan Administration It is a book with few heroes and many fools The author claims naivete as his excuse Although the narrative is somewhat confusing, overall, its backstage view of policymaking leaves one discouraged, even frightened by the superficiality The book is a necessary library purchase for two reasons the notoriety of the book and its author, and the insider s view of key policies still in place and key personalities still in power Richard C Schiming, Economics Dept Mankato State Univ Minn.Political Studies, American Studies

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    One thought on “The Triumph of Politics: Why the Reagan Revolution Failed”

    1. The author, David Stockman, was the primary implementer of supply side economics during the early Reagan years. As director of Office of Management and Budget he found himself butting heads with special interest forces that were corrupting his supply side ideology. He became greatly alarmed at projections of exploding deficits due to steep tax cuts that were not compensated for by commensurate spending cuts. On the plus side the initial stimulus did get the economy moving for a few years. On the [...]

    2. 19 Jan. 2017 - My thoughts 30 years after reading this book:1. It was a gripping and exemplary history of how this OMB Director in the first Reagan term actually tried to implement Reagan's proposed cuts in the Fed. budget and departments.2. It showed how most of Reagan's cabinet appointees were far from part of the process to cut the budget, but were rather on the "receiving end" of the cuts, and not happy or supportive.3. Weinberger (Defense) AND Haig (State) were particularly egregious offend [...]

    3. At times, this book came off as one of the most insightful political memoirs I've ever read, and at others, it seemed a soporific swirl of disconnected numbers and politicians.David Stockman certainly gets points for writing that rarest of memoirs, a mea culpa, and his heartfelt agony, and there is no other word for it, at the unprecedented deficits his early policies and plans produced is earnest and even touching. Sometimes, the book's apologies can even veer into narcissism, since Stockman (t [...]

    4. Rarely would I suggest to start reading a book at the back end, but I do not hesitate to do so with this one. It is in the last two chapters (Epilogue: The Triumph of Politics, Appendix: The Fiscal Facts) that Stockman succintly tells the crux of this 450 page tome about the $1 trillion fiscal calamity of the Reagan era.Those readers who would then be intrigued to learn minutiae of dealings of the White House with its cabinet and the Congress during the first five years of the "Reagan revolution [...]

    5. I don't know about others, but I do enjoy well written "insider" accounts of what happens in politics is intelligently and honestly done. Indeed, I have sometimes thought of developing a political science class where such works would serve as textbooks. If I ever had the courage tyo follow through, this would be on the short list. Stockman was one of President Reagan's top person on his economic team. And, over time, he began to raise questions about economic policy. This book ios his reflection [...]

    6. I loved this book. A gripping and fascinating insider's account of the battles surrounding the early Reagan budgets, by the architect of those budgets. I read this many years ago, and it changed forever my perceptions and understanding of the federal budget process. Very interesting book.

    7. To read a summary of The Triumph of Politics is to think you're reading an argument for why you should skip it and find another book. It is, after all, about David Stockman-President Reagan's Budget Director-trying to cut spending in Washington and put together a budget. Literally, that's what it's about. Budgets, graphs, special interests competing--hardly riveting material. And yet what Stockman found when he was plucked out the House of Representatives to work in the Reagan administration was [...]

    8. Independientemente de los planteamientos políticos y económicos del autor y de aquéllos a quien sirvió, el libro es muy interesante.Nos cuenta los errores de cálculo, los choques frontales, las manipulaciones secretas y los contubernios que condujeron al fracaso de la Revolución reaganiana, que produjo un déficit apabullante de un billón de dólares en vez del presupuesto equilibrado que el presidente había prometido al electoradoIncluso los miembros del Congreso favorables a la reducci [...]

    9. We know history. And history is wrong about the Reagan Administration. History says Reagan slashed welfare and aid to pay for tax cuts. That is only half true. Nothing was cut under Reagan. As Stockman points out, many programs despised by the GOP actually grew under Reagan. No matter how redundant or ineffective, or how much money they wasted, all government programs were supported by some Republicans in the Congress. Six of eight years of Reagan's administration had a GOP Senate and the House [...]

    10. David Stockman, Reagan’s Budget Director, was a NeoCon leader and a devout believer in that oxymoron, a conservative revolution. No one believed more in what economics major, George H. W. Bush famously labeled voodoo economics than Stockman. That the Laffer Curve was just a doodle on a napkin, not even backed by a real economic theory, let alone supported by any study didn’t dissuade him. That Supply Side Economics was the very thing that conservative hero, Adam Smith, had disproved in The W [...]

    11. This is a must-read for any serious student of the Reagan era, and a great addition to such a student's personal library. The irony is that this book was in my personal collection many years ago, and I gave it away. Not only that, I was only able to get through half of it before it totally bogged down for me in minutia. The problem was that this was the first book I attempted to read on the whole Reaganomics phenomenon, and it was simply information overload. So read this book, but not unless yo [...]

    12. Just started reading (page 67 out of 394) but it is entertaining reading by David Stockman, Reagan's Director of the Office of Management and Budget, who with Jack Kemp and Arthur Laffer (remember the Laffer curve written on a napkin?) created the supply side emphasis of the Reagan administration. From the beginning he implies that Reagan was basically a likeable guy but an empty suit who had to be educated intensely to understand Stockman's ideas and ultimately abandoned the total concept becau [...]

    13. This book should be on the reading list of everyone really interested in politics, either in the 80s or now. Stockman really takes us through how the ideologues just pulled the numbers out of the air and their decisions exploded the deficit in the 80s. I had never realized that even as late as the early 80s (and maybe now) how the conservative movement fundamentally wanted to undo the reforms of the 1930s and 1960s.

    14. This was in the free books bin the guy is clearly clever, but honestly, I don't know enough about the hidden dynamics of the Reagan administration to gauge the veracity of his account. (And I'm not sure that I want to.)He mentions having written a paper tracing conservative philosophers back to early liberal thinkers which intrigues me, because I've always felt a sense of interconnection there that I haven't been able to articulate.

    15. There are a lot of things to find captivating about this book. What strikes me most of all is that the "Reagan Revolution" was a total bust from the start and that these are still some of the same arguments we're having today. I think everybody interested in politics needs to revisit this book ASAP.

    16. While this book had its boring and difficult to understand sections, it proved to be an informative read. The author was both brutally honest and earnest in mapping out his own and Ronald Reagan's failure to implement the economic and fiscal policies promised by his campaign.

    17. I like this one better than his new one. It's had a better combination of narrative but also concise points.

    18. An excellent view on what it's like to try to get something done in Washington. Stockman spares no detail and plays no favorites.

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