On Strike Against God Joanna Russ s On Strike Against God is remarkable for its deft intertwining of many themes not only the overt one of coming out but many intricately and inevitably interlaced stories of alienation a

  • Title: On Strike Against God
  • Author: Joanna Russ
  • ISBN: 9780918314130
  • Page: 100
  • Format: Paperback
  • Joanna Russ s On Strike Against God is remarkable for its deft intertwining of many themes not only the overt one of coming out, but many intricately and inevitably interlaced stories of alienation, a search for community and rebellion against how our society defines women.

    • ☆ On Strike Against God || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Joanna Russ
      100 Joanna Russ
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ On Strike Against God || ✓ PDF Download by ↠ Joanna Russ
      Posted by:Joanna Russ
      Published :2018-01-07T01:07:28+00:00

    One thought on “On Strike Against God”

    1. I am so frustrated by not taking note of, or action on, this at the time, but I read something the other day that referenced something being "catty," in a "second wave feminist" way. What the fuck. How can I not remember where I read something so appalling? This book is Joanna Russ's only non-sci fi novel. It's subtitled, in some places, "A Lesbian Love Story," which it both is and isn't. It is a lesbian love story, a coming out story, and a look inside the mind of a brilliant second wave femini [...]

    2. Very good. A kind of transitional 2nd-3rd wave feminist love story of sorts, very well written. What critiques I might have of her stance some 30 years after the fact are pretty much irrelevant. “Oh, Esther, I don’t want to be a feminist. I don’t enjoy it. It’s no fun.”“I know,” I said. “I don’t either.” People think you decide to be “radical,” for God’s sake, like deciding to be a librarian or a ship’s chandler. You “make up your mind,” you “commit yourself.” [...]

    3. To-read for this quotation: “Oh, Esther, I don’t want to be a feminist. I don’t enjoy it. It’s no fun.” “I know,” I said. “I don’t either.” People think you decide to be “radical,” for God’s sake, like deciding to be a librarian or a ship’s chandler. You “make up your mind,” you “commit yourself.” (Sounds like a mental hospital, doesn’t it?) I said, "Don’t worry, we could be buried together and have engraved on our tombstone the awful truth, which some day [...]

    4. I loved this book so hard! The first few pages were a little rough going, but like reading any Joanna Russ fiction, once I'm into it, her writing is some of my favorite. This was knowledgable and sexy and angry and original, and how often do you get to say that about a romantic lesbian story you find at the library?

    5. Back and forth on this one between four and five stars. The way she uses civil rights movement to talk about women's lib is annoying but it's such a smart, sharp book w a lesbian heroine

    6. I found in this book, for the first time in my life, an accurate description of an aspect of my childhood I had been afraid of because I didn't understand it until I found it in this book.

    7. I'd rate it lower, but it has some insightful bits and I am not the target audience. The story just seemed very bland. An observant, feminist, lesbian with a strong imagination finds love, but life is complicated. For most of it I heavily identified with Esther, thinking that if she was closer to how I'd be if I was a woman than anything else I've read, but then the violent fantasies disabused me of that notion.Still reading Russ, but bit by bit becoming convinced her value comes from literary c [...]

    8. This book might deserve more time than I gave it, but I was enjoying myself so I breezed through it. I was reading for pleasure, in any event, and didn't feel up to academic-like scrutinizing. I enjoyed the inner dialogue and feminist frustration. I even laughed aloud several times. How sad though that I can sympathize so much with the protagonist's plight 26+ years later. So much for women's progress.

    9. Reread 5/1/11. The sexy bits are amazingly sensual. I used to think Hugh and Ellen were disguised versions of Damon Knight and Kate Wilhelm, I'm not sure why. Maybe because they were the only long-married writing-instructor pair I'd heard of? Does getting up at 4am to write show up in Wilhelm's memoir? Can't remember.

    10. Certainly not the usual sort of thing I read, but nevertheless I enjoyed it. Stridently feminist while being touching and funny at the same time. I could whine about the lack of any positive male characters, but the author has little time for "middle class white men who suffer." :-)

    11. If even a tiny bit of you is still utopian, read Joanna Russ. If even a tiny bit of you is still afraid, Read Joanna Russ. Read Joanna Russ.

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