The Tale of Sinuhe And Other Ancient Egyptian Poems B C Drawing on recent advances in Egyptology R B Parkinson s new translations bring to life for the modern reader the golden age of Egyptian fictional literature the Middle Kingdom c BC The bo

  • Title: The Tale of Sinuhe: And Other Ancient Egyptian Poems 1940-1640 B.C.
  • Author: Unknown R.B. Parkinson
  • ISBN: 9780192839664
  • Page: 361
  • Format: Paperback
  • Drawing on recent advances in Egyptology, R B Parkinson s new translations bring to life for the modern reader the golden age of Egyptian fictional literature, the Middle Kingdom c 1940 1640 BC The book features The Tale of Sinuhe, acclaimed as the masterpiece of Egyptian poetry, which tells of a courtier s adventures after he flees Egypt Other works include storiesDrawing on recent advances in Egyptology, R B Parkinson s new translations bring to life for the modern reader the golden age of Egyptian fictional literature, the Middle Kingdom c 1940 1640 BC The book features The Tale of Sinuhe, acclaimed as the masterpiece of Egyptian poetry, which tells of a courtier s adventures after he flees Egypt Other works include stories of fantastic wonders from the court of the builder of the Great Pyramid, a lyrical dialogue between a man and his soul on the nature of death and the problem of suffering, and teachings about the nature of virtue and wisdom, one of which is bitterly spoken from the grave by the assassinated king Amenemhat I, founder of the Twelfth Dynasty A general introduction discusses the historical context of the poetry, the nature of poetry, and the role of literature in ancient Egyptian culture while a full set of notes explicates allusions, details of mythology, place names, and the like Parkinson s book provides, for the first time, a literary reading to enable these poems to entertain and instruct the modern reader, as they did their original audiences three and a half thousand years ago.Content TALES1 The Tale of Sinuhe2 The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant3 The Tale of the Shipwrecked Sailor4 The Tale of King Cheops CourtDISCOURSES5 The Words of Neferti6 The Words of Khakheprreseneb7 The Dialogue of a Man and his Soul8 The Dialogue of Ipuur and the Lord of AllTEACHINGS9 The teaching of King Amenenmhat10 The Teaching of King Merikare11 The Loyalist Teaching12 The teaching of the Vizier Ptahhotep13 The Teaching of KhetiPHRASES AND FRAGMENTS14 Phrases and Fragments

    • Best Download [Unknown R.B. Parkinson] ✓ The Tale of Sinuhe: And Other Ancient Egyptian Poems 1940-1640 B.C. || [Paranormal Book] PDF ☆
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      Published :2018-08-16T08:51:06+00:00

    One thought on “The Tale of Sinuhe: And Other Ancient Egyptian Poems 1940-1640 B.C.”

    1. Once again I’m surprised to find that a classical classic is such a great read. You’d think by now I’d realize they’re classics for a reason.The first segment, The Story of Sinuhe, is on Philip Ward’s 500 books list, so I chose this volume. But I actually enjoyed the subsequent pieces much more. Perhaps Ward chose it because the Sinuhe poem is more complex than the others in terms of plot, geographical range, and theme (displacement, identity bound up with country) or perhaps the langu [...]

    2. This is the best collection I could find of ancient Egyptian poetry, all from the Middle Kingdom, 1940 - 1640 BC. The translation is awkward, the introductions boring, the poems themselves mostly just opaque, but it does give you some insight into how ancient Egyptians felt about the world. Or I could just tell you: they were pretty bummed out about it. They were pretty much poor and overworked, and then they died when they were like 35, and in spare moments they said shit like this:There is no [...]

    3. I enjoyed reading this text, especially because it is written as a "first person narrative". I think it makes any story even more engaging when the mouth of the person experiencing it tells it. In this case written by the main character himself. Sinuhe tells the hardships he went through and how he fled his home in Egypt, but how wonderful that he was taken in by another king and given power over a tribe. In this text Sinuhe defeated a great warrior, which gave him fame among the people he was n [...]

    4. The Tale of Sinuhe is one of the earliest extant pieces of literature, following the older version of The Epic of Gilgamesh, ANON, 'Surpassing all other kings'. It was written circa 1900BCE. It's considered a very masterful work of poetry, so much so that its anonymous author has been lauded "the Egyptian Shakespeare". This translation is by R.B. Parkinson.The entire text is posed as a speech on the part of Sinuhe—"Sinuhe says, 'I was'"."The God ascended to his horizon". This shows some Ancien [...]

    5. Fuck Sinuhe, but not really. He was a fine guy, I guess. But whatever, the best part of this was the love poems.It reminds you how fucking banal your love dramas are. Some poems are about how fleeting love can be, in another, a girl worries that after her lover spent the night he is more interested in breakfast than in staying with her. Well, JESUS CHRIST, three THOUSAND years later, I HAVE THOSE SAME PROBLEMS. I KNOW THAT FEELING, GIRL WHO LIVED THREE THOUSAND YEARS AGO! YOU'RE NOT ALONE!"Bette [...]

    6. From what I can tell(with my lack of education and a couple hours browsing ancient literature on ), a survey of the most ancient surviving literature should probably start with this book and another of Oxford's World Classics, 'Myths From Mesopotamia', which is my next read. While not necessarily the greatest to read as a modern reader these stories are priceless views into life ~4000 years ago and are even more fascinating as testaments to literature's beginnings and the wealth of stories that [...]

    7. I really did enjoy reading this and the value this text added to my education. I am personally very intrigued with the Egyptian culture and have been for a very long time. Though I also liked how this tale linked back to other tales I am familiar with that come out of the same region. Sinuhe, like Moses, wondered the desert in search of refuge from his Egyptian life. And there is context that I find similar to that of the story of Joseph, of course these are biblical stories from the Christian b [...]

    8. A wonderful collection of old and largely forgotten Egyptian poems that conjure up this lost world more vividly than the ubiquitous images of pyramids. Some of these I had read before, many I had not, and it was wonderful to experience them one after the other. My favorite is "The Dialogue of a Man With His Soul," where a man's soul is trying to run away from the specter of death, and the man is trying to argue why he should stay to face death as a couple. It's fascinating and surprisingly movin [...]

    9. Assigning a single rating to this book is almost an impossible task, given that it consists of texts (sometimes fragmentary) composed by many authors in a variety of genres over the course of centuries, as well as extensive commentary added nearly 3,000 years later.For the most part, it's perhaps best to say that relatively little of the book is really recreational reading, even compared to other work of the distant past such as Beowulf, or the Epic of Gilgamesh. Most of the four "tales," includ [...]

    10. The Tale of Sinuhe was a masterpiece of Egyptian poetry the tells of the courtiers adventures after he flees Egypt. The Egyptian Sinuhe actually panic when he hears the king has been assassinated, Sinuhe nearly dies in the dessert. He was founded and sold to a Palestinian were he became an advisor and luckily gained plenty wealth. He later returns back to his home land were he was invited back by the current Egyptian King. R.B Parkinson was the one that wrote this classical piece of writing. He [...]

    11. In my quest to read the earlier "proto-literature", I thought a visit to my Egyptian neighbours through Sinuhe a fitting start. (next :The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, maybe The Rig Veda too, or anything else I can lay my hands on). While reading The Tale of Sinuhe, I alighed two different hieroglyphic transliterations (widely found on the net) in order to try and get a real feeling of the original texts, needless to say that it made my focus spread over 3 versions of the same tale simultaneo [...]

    12. This was a good read because it was told from the first person point of view. As you read along, you understood his many struggles, starting at birth. Basically what's important is although he ran away and did reinvent himself, there was still a part of him that wanted to know his heritage (an Egyptian). I am glad to know that he did get the opportunity to return and learn what it truly meant to be an Egyptian. The moral of story was overcoming adversities, becoming successful, but a place you f [...]

    13. I enjoyed this reading as well, I like reading "first person narratives". It makes me feel as if the writer is speaking to me personally. It really helps me to engage in the story and understand the writer’s view. It’s like a journal or a personal journal that is being shared. I felt that Sinuhe was telling me his hardships that he faced and how he fled his home in Egypt. And how he was encountered by another king and given power over a tribe. Sinuhe defeated a great warrior, which gave him [...]

    14. I enjoyed reading this text, especially because it is written as a "first person narrative". I think it makes any story even more engaging when the mouth of the person experiencing it tells it. In this case written by the main character himself. Sinuhe tells the hardships he went through and how he fled his home in Egypt, but how wonderful that he was taken in by another king and given power over a tribe.which gave him fame among the people he was newly ruling,this story also reminded of David a [...]

    15. I liked this story! Just like other books from the time frameit was written, it is a story that is told or narrated. It speaks of corruption, murder, but with a fairy tale ending. The main character Sinuhe leaves his home land of Egypt that he loved so much out of fear, because he may be murdered like the king. On his own he finds himself in another land where the King loved him, he marries the daughter of the king claiming to be the next king to rule the throne of the land. Sinuhe gives up his [...]

    16. This is the first time I've read any Ancient Egyptian poetry.I find it fascinating that some of these are nearly 4,000 years old, yet they talk about the same problems and concerns that we have now. The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant is beautifully written.The various poems gathered under the title of: teachings, reminded me of the wisdom literature in the bible.And, without a shred of a doubt, the most frustrating 'fragment' is The Tale of the Herdsman, who is 'targeted' by a Godess. It breaks of [...]

    17. Accessible, maybe note heavy, introductory volume of Ancient Egyptian literature. Unless you are going to be a scholar in the field, this volume will likely be sufficient to give you a sample of the 'Greatest Hits' of the time.To get the most of the poems, you might want to read a poem through in its entirety, and then reread it while referring to the notes. They seem to flow better if uninterrupted.Read a few of these poems, and you realize that human concerns haven't changed much after the pas [...]

    18. As an insight into Ancient Egyptian culture this book is really good. As an entertaining read not so much, because very little of it is dedicated to Ancient Egyptian fictional stories, and most is dedicated to discourses.

    19. "You are a sungod, lord of heaven Everyone's portion is with you, like a flood. Punisher of the robber, protector of the poor — become not a torrent against the appealer! Take heed of eternity's approach!"

    20. I have completed the portions of this book that I need to for my paper.One day I will hopefully complete this book and be able to fully appreciate it, but where I am right now it's just not possible.

    21. Interesting how basic human behavior has not changed in 4,000 years. Unfortunately, the extant writings only hint at the wisdom of the Egyptians of the Middle Kingdom.

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