Man s Rise to Civilization as Shown by the Indians of North America from Primeval Times to the Coming of the Industrial State The publication of this book in marked the first comprehensive examination of the history and culture of native Americans Today this work continues to stand as one of the major summaries of the i

  • Title: Man's Rise to Civilization as Shown by the Indians of North America from Primeval Times to the Coming of the Industrial State
  • Author: Peter Farb
  • ISBN: 9780436151309
  • Page: 362
  • Format: None
  • The publication of this book in 1968 marked the first comprehensive examination of the history and culture of native Americans Today this work continues to stand as one of the major summaries of the indigenous societies of North America with its explication of such universal subjects as monotheism, war, capitalism, and sex.

    • Free Read [Spirituality Book] ☆ Man's Rise to Civilization as Shown by the Indians of North America from Primeval Times to the Coming of the Industrial State - by Peter Farb ✓
      362 Peter Farb
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Spirituality Book] ☆ Man's Rise to Civilization as Shown by the Indians of North America from Primeval Times to the Coming of the Industrial State - by Peter Farb ✓
      Posted by:Peter Farb
      Published :2019-03-26T04:55:49+00:00

    One thought on “Man's Rise to Civilization as Shown by the Indians of North America from Primeval Times to the Coming of the Industrial State”

    1. The only reason I gave this dangerous and wrongheaded mess a star is so that could tell that I had rated it. How bad is it? Let's see: Farb states that the Mandan are extinct (they'll be pleased to know) that Plains Indians are imaginary (likewise) and that Sitting Bull was killed by accident. By accident. Need I say more? OK. The original foreward to this evil pretense read, ".nning with the most pitiful and primitiveIndians found by explorers, the Digger Indians of Nevada and Utah, Mr. Farb s [...]

    2. Please read Vine Deloria Jr's book Custer Died for Your Sins, chapter 4 to get an understanding of the damage this book has done in its perpetuation of negative stereotypes and misportrayal of indigenous peoples in the U.S. Aka hogwash. (Should be zero stars, but not an option)

    3. A great piece of anthropological analysis. As interesting as it is informative, Peter Farb had a gift for eloquent presentation as well as academic and integrative thought.

    4. This is a good overview of the various Native American cultures throughout history. It is well-written, detailed, and intriguing. It helped me appreciate the amazing diversity of culture that existed on this continent before the Europeans conquered it, as well as all the hard work by archaeologists and anthropologists that went into uncovering it. The amount of detail they were uncover from these cultures, some of which were long gone before they came around, is astonishing. Still, so much is sa [...]

    5. AWESOME!!! The title is actually a sarcastic commentary on the "whitewashing" of the continent. A few quotes from the book follow:"Today's American bemoans the extermination of the passenger pigeon and the threatened extinction of the whooping crane and the ivory-billed woodpecker; he contributes to conservation organizations that seek to preserve the Hawaiian goose, the sea otter of the Aleutian Islands, the lizard of the Galápagos Islands. "But who ever shed a tear over the loss of native Ame [...]

    6. Best quote "To do nothing now (speaking of preserving Indian culture) is to let our children lament that they never knew the magnificent diversity of humankind because our generation let disappear those cultures that might have taught it to them." Farb gives a moving and researched opinion stating that Indians should be allowed to do as they wish and as their culture dictates. This was a great book if you are interested in learning more about different types of Indians and how they were viewed i [...]

    7. The best book I've ever read about Native Americans before Columbus. It's packed with everything from the band to the state, food, social structure, status of women, child rearing, etc. etc. It is a wonderful book!

    8. Masterful review of past and recent theories of social and cultural development of civilizations in North and Central America.

    9. I feel compelled to balance out some of the more politicized reviews here because I think its alleged propagandist motivations have been exaggerated. I would NOT recommended this book as a detailed or comprehensive survey of Native American culture. It's a work of comparative anthropology in the "neorevolutionary" tradition. The sociopolitical attributes of various Native American tribes are summarized selectively and arranged sequentially to support the author's hypothesis of universal and unil [...]

    10. I first read this book in the late '60s early 70s - it was awesome! It takes the Americas and treats them as a test-tube. It looks at Native American societies and analyses the development of cultures and society as a series of advances from primitive tribe to sophisticated empire. It relates these advances to the local response to the environment and forces acting upon these societies. The book is full of fascinating facts and leaves one with the feeling that one has really begun to understand [...]

    11. An insightful and thought-provoking discussion of the failures of modern social structures and why they will fail and who will survive. I was intrigued both by the idea and the ultimate concept that the simpler, poorer (?) way of life will continue through all but the destruction of life as we know it. I don't often pick up a book on anthropology but this was really really good.

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