In Buddha s Kitchen Cooking Being Cooked and Other Adventures at a Meditation Center Kimberley Snow offers an outrageously funny and honest account of her adventures as head cook at a Tibetan Buddhist retreat center With her earthy sensibility and sharp sense of humor the author show

  • Title: In Buddha's Kitchen : Cooking, Being Cooked, and Other Adventures at a Meditation Center
  • Author: Kimberley Snow
  • ISBN: 9781590300473
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Kimberley Snow offers an outrageously funny and honest account of her adventures as head cook at a Tibetan Buddhist retreat center With her earthy sensibility and sharp sense of humor, the author shows this world in a light devoid of preciousness while expressing with heart the integrity of the spiritual work being undertaken We come away from our visit to this exotic reKimberley Snow offers an outrageously funny and honest account of her adventures as head cook at a Tibetan Buddhist retreat center With her earthy sensibility and sharp sense of humor, the author shows this world in a light devoid of preciousness while expressing with heart the integrity of the spiritual work being undertaken We come away from our visit to this exotic realm having found it both extraordinary and surprisingly familiar The neuroses, obsessions, and petty concerns exposed by Snow both in herself and her fellow staff members prove to be grist for the mill for discovering the grace inherent in life just as it is.

    • Free Read [Sports Book] ↠ In Buddha's Kitchen : Cooking, Being Cooked, and Other Adventures at a Meditation Center - by Kimberley Snow ✓
      308 Kimberley Snow
    • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Sports Book] ↠ In Buddha's Kitchen : Cooking, Being Cooked, and Other Adventures at a Meditation Center - by Kimberley Snow ✓
      Posted by:Kimberley Snow
      Published :2018-08-02T19:14:50+00:00

    One thought on “In Buddha's Kitchen : Cooking, Being Cooked, and Other Adventures at a Meditation Center”

    1. Did we read the same book? I am thoroughly puzzled by the positive reviews this book has on and . I thought it was going to be a book about a woman cooking at a Buddhist retreat: basically a food/cooking memoir set at a place where you might least expect. Instead, the reader is treated to a mishmash of essays on various topics, but very little about the actual cooking and/or the the staff or the people who come to the meditation center/retreat/etc. This was thoroughly disappointing. Snow has a [...]

    2. Often when I read auto biographies, I wish the author would have taken a few more years and a little more time in writing their story. Instead of compiling disjointed essays to fill pages, Snow could have written a semi-fictional account of her life that would have read as a modern Siddhartha tale of finding her way. This book repeats thoughts and introduces events that had already been introduced. There were a couple of really good essays in this book that kept me interested and reading. Snow m [...]

    3. Overall, this is an enjoyable book. I was attracted to the idea of reading a Westerner's view of a Tibetan Buddhist centre from the point of view of someone other than a newly ordained monk/nun, or a simple visitor.Although I think the author has a good voice, I find myself holding back on rating this book highly due to a few issues that I find it hard to overlook. Namely, I thought her 'play', which makes up one chapter, was disappointingly racist; playing on the stereotype of the fat, black, v [...]

    4. I found this book quite frustrating. At times I was on the verge of abandoning it altogether only to discover the next paragraph or two to be of some interest. Wish she'd spoken more about some things and way less about others. Also agree with others re the play - leave it out.

    5. This is a genuinely kind hearted and humorous look by the author at her own foibles and those of others while working in a retreat kitchen. Really refreshing.

    6. I found this book at a book fair in Texas with my family. I LOVE food and have lots of interest in Buddhist thought so, I was like sign me up! If u have ever seen the movie Burnt the main character in that movie needed this book! The Author goes to a retreat and when the cooks back goes out she volunteered to head the kitchen since she once ran a very high end restaurant. She talks about how back in the Chef days the staff called her god out of fear and respect but mostly fear. Her anger and per [...]

    7. I loved this book for a variety of reasons: a behind-the-scenes look at a Buddhist retreat center, the exploration of how to live the principles we are taught, and the twists and turns of the author’s spiritual journey. And chapter 11 on the Jizo ceremony for unborn children was profoundly moving. Sometimes the narrative felt a little disjointed, but not enough to interfere with my soaking up the words like a thirsty sponge.

    8. Kimberley Snow describes her time working in a kitchen at a Buddhist retreat with spiritual prose and vivid descriptions. Unfortunately, her stories of time spent in an upscale restaurant, which are more comical, are minimal. I did appreciate her descriptions of the Buddhist belief that there are three root things that poison the mind, including attachment, aversion, and ignorance, which affect relationships because we see the other as the object of our affections, rather than a subject or being [...]

    9. This was, overall, a very good book. She talks about being a very high-powered chef with an anger problem: read very very scary woman. She learns how to be aware of her anger and deal with it through Buddhism. BUT don't think it's all preachy because it is not. It's very funny and irreverent. The only thing I did not like was that it didn't seem like she aimed to write a book, it's more "musings" or random chapters at times. Overall, though those chapters, random or not, brought a coherent messa [...]

    10. I feel that this work was honest and a great tool to provide to individuals who are fresh to Buddhism. The book shows that frustration is okay and perfection is not something to expect from yourself. I enjoyed Snow's outlook on many different topics. While the play was not necessarily my favorite aspect of the book I think it gave good insight to Snow as a person and a good look at the atmosphere of the time in which the play had been written. The chapter regarding aborted and miscarried childre [...]

    11. A great insight into live in a Buddhist Centre, at some point made me feeling nostalgic about the time I've spent in a Buddhist retreat. Although a great read, to me it seemed more like an autobiography, some parts I have even skipped (the play). Perhaps that's just me looking for some reminders of my time in the Retreat,but that's what I wanted to read about in this book, not about previous worldly experience as a chef in a restaurant ( more than a half of the book is dedicated to that).

    12. I had forgotten about this book, and just recently stumbled upon a description in the shambhala publication magazine. This book reminded me of how everyday activities such as working in a kitchen, can be treated as a meditation; that the whole process of preparing a meal and serving it can be such a gift. Snow's sense of humor and honesty about the perils of the spiritual path are a great reminder not to take any of it too seriously.

    13. This is kind of in the same vein as The Barn at the End of the World, which is one of my favorite books. One woman's personal experience of Tibetan Buddhism, her own struggles, how it fits in her own life, with little bits of the Lamas' teachings.

    14. Simply one of the very best books written! Kimberly Snow has a nack for self-exploration with out rampnant ego dancing! If you've ever practiced meditation, or cookedis one's for you!I actually completed this book a few years agobut it's still one that I reach for when I have "nothing to read"!

    15. I've read many books on theory about Buddhism, but I swear I learned more about walking the walk, Living the Path, from this book than anything I've read so far. The stories are touching, funny, and give real insight into what the sometimes abstract teachings of Buddha really mean in a modern world. Highly recommended for any student of the Way.

    16. Snow wrote a pile of essays about her experience in kitchens at a Tibetan Buddhist retreat center and at other times in her life and published them as a book. Some are better than others (I could've done without the dinner theater piece) some sad, some insightful - if you are interested in other peoples insights into themselves (which, sometimes, I am).

    17. I read the ARC. I don't know about the final version, but I thought it was weird that a book about a volunteer cook in a Buddhist retreat center didn't have a single recipe in it. Otherwise it was awesome. I especially was moved by the chapter on the memorial services for miscarriages or abortions.

    18. Snow has a wandering spirit. Somehow it leads her from work as a professor in a university to a cook in a kitchen to a chef in a monastery. The time she spent in the monastery seemed to help her and, in the end, she seemed a stronger person.

    19. A wonderful memoir of her years as a chef at a northern California Buddhist retreat center. She talks of lessons learned in the kitchen but also from the monks, students and teachers who passed through. Very engaging!

    20. I feel like it was an interesting, well written book. There were a few chapters that I felt could have been left out. These chapters didn't seem irrelevant but did stray from where the book was headed. Maybe, it's her style of writing which contains many essays instead of long chapters.

    21. this had odd bits, but I really liked it. It pulled you into the story, and the buddhism was integral but not 'preachy'.

    22. This book made me want to push myself to be more introspective and to practice listening. For people who are interested in Buddhism in the US and kitchens, this is a short, thoughtful read.

    23. Immensely thought-provoking. Delivers Buddhist precepts painlessly in a very interesting context. I really admire Ms. Snow.

    24. The first few pages were interesting. Then it just became monotonous. I expected deeper insights from the author than just "working in a kitchen can be an act of mindfulness".

    25. Book Club selection. Interesting journey of a woman's/chef's life and ability to eventually have insight on her life and people in her life with the help of the Lamas and meditation.

    26. I enjoyed reading the correlation between cooking and spirituality, more specifically, Buddhism. The essays were honest, and her journey to finding a more spiritual self was enlightening.

    27. Expected more of cheffing and less Buddhism, but ended up enjoying the evolving self awareness of the writer, and the introspection.

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