The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima Nagasaki The bomb exploded over Hiroshima at on the morning of August About an hour previously the Japanese early warning radar net had detected the approach of some American aircraft headed for

  • Title: The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima & Nagasaki
  • Author: The Manhattan Engineer District
  • ISBN: 9781594560835
  • Page: 403
  • Format: Paperback
  • The bomb exploded over Hiroshima at 8 15 on the morning of August 6, 1945 About an hour previously, the Japanese early warning radar net had detected the approach of some American aircraft headed for the southern part of Japan The alert had been given and radio broadcasting stopped in many cities, among them Hiroshima The planes approached the coast at a very high altitThe bomb exploded over Hiroshima at 8 15 on the morning of August 6, 1945 About an hour previously, the Japanese early warning radar net had detected the approach of some American aircraft headed for the southern part of Japan The alert had been given and radio broadcasting stopped in many cities, among them Hiroshima The planes approached the coast at a very high altitude.

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      Published :2019-03-16T02:53:48+00:00

    One thought on “The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima & Nagasaki”

    1. This book is a dichotomy to me. The first three-quarters of the book is a report published by the Manhattan Engineer District (the Manhattan Project) on June 29, 1946. It is a very scientific, "just the facts" article on the destruction caused by the atomic bombs that were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Everything in the article is detailed in feet, starting at the center of the explosion which they label as X, and extending out 40,000 feet or more. I had to stop and figure out how far this [...]

    2. Bare bones report of the military commission sent to Hiroshima and Nagasaki after the atomic bombings in August 1945. Includes statistics for casualties, destruction circles, and other raw data collected on-site. Since the US military and government refused to acknowledge that there was any residual radiation in the areas and that it affected people years later, no human effects were included.

    3. This is an interesting primary source document, the U.S. government report on the effects of the atomic bombs dropped on Japan to end World War II. Short and concise, but detailed, it would make a good complement to John Hersey's Hiroshima.

    4. The Manhattan Engineer District along with input from the Army Corps of Engineers really handled this subject well in this book. A tragedy, a technical marvel, and a scientific achievement all explained in clear, neutral language. But it wasn't all cold and emotionless. Punctuating the text are solemn and pensive quotes from people of various disciplines around the world in reaction to the bombs dropping. The most powerful passage in the book comes at the end: an eyewitness account of a German p [...]

    5. A technical report on the use of the Atom Bomb and it's aftereffects, it contains a spectacular description of the destruction caused in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Despite the fragmented format in which the report is laid out, it is interesting and comprehensible. As nearly 70 years have passed since its publication, it is likely that a lot of the findings herein this report have since changed with later and greater developments in nuclear weaponry. Nevertheless, its observations of damage sustaine [...]

    6. Still relative little was really well known about the effects, especially in the long term, when The Atomic Bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by The Manhattan Engineer District. This is evident when collateral damage was assessed outside of the kill and damage zones. The first part of the book explains, rater coldly, the damages to structures and the population within the kill zone. Numbers of dead, numbering in the thousands, are frankly and stated without emotion. Structural damages were prec [...]

    7. This is interesting mostly because of its context. Written by the US government about a year after the bombings, it's an attempt to summarize the damage in a clinical manner. There is much emphasis on the structural damage, less given to physical injury, and a repeated insistence that there were no lingering radiation injuries beyond the initial blast. Given the time frame, there was no way they could have known about the radiation, but the assertions still seem very naive.

    8. After reading the Manhattan Project collection of articles, excerpts, and articles, I thought it may be interesting to read this report 70+ years after the bomb was delivered to Japan. Even though the statistics, numbers, and analysis from the scientific perspective were all interesting, the most gripping part of the report is the final eyewitness account given. It leaves you scratching your head why we would ever want to go to war as a species.

    9. This is the aftereffects report of the Manhattan Project. It's a technical document, and reads like it, cataloging damages to people and property caused by the atomic bomb. It does include a first-person account of the bombing, written by a German priest, which seems familiar, and might have formed the core of John Hersey's Hiroshima.

    10. The book was written in a report style. It stated various facts about casualties due to the atomic bomb. The book went in depth about the causes of deaths and injuries as well as the effects of each atom bomb.

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