When Memory Comes Four months before Hitler came to power Pavel Friedl nder was born in Prague to a middle class Jewish family In seven year old Pavel and his family were forced to flee Czechoslovakia for France

  • Title: When Memory Comes
  • Author: Saul Friedländer Helen R. Lane
  • ISBN: 9780374522728
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Paperback
  • Four months before Hitler came to power, Pavel Friedl nder was born in Prague to a middle class Jewish family In 1939, seven year old Pavel and his family were forced to flee Czechoslovakia for France, but his parents were able to conceal their son in a Roman Catholic seminary before being shipped to their destruction After a whole hearted religious conversion, young PavFour months before Hitler came to power, Pavel Friedl nder was born in Prague to a middle class Jewish family In 1939, seven year old Pavel and his family were forced to flee Czechoslovakia for France, but his parents were able to conceal their son in a Roman Catholic seminary before being shipped to their destruction After a whole hearted religious conversion, young Pavel began training for priesthood The birth of Israel prompted his discovery of his Jewish past and his true identity Friedl nder describes his experiences, moving from Israeli present to European past with composure and elegance.The Wisconsin edition is not for sale in the British Commonwealth or Empire excluding Canada.

    • ↠ When Memory Comes || ✓ PDF Read by ¶ Saul Friedländer Helen R. Lane
      144 Saul Friedländer Helen R. Lane
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ When Memory Comes || ✓ PDF Read by ¶ Saul Friedländer Helen R. Lane
      Posted by:Saul Friedländer Helen R. Lane
      Published :2018-08-20T23:28:03+00:00

    One thought on “When Memory Comes”

    1. A beautifully written memoir about the Czech author's memories hiding in a Catholic seminary in France and subsequent discovery of his Jewish roots and embrace of Israel. "There are certain memories that cannot be shared, so great is the gap between the meaning they have for us and what others might see in them."

    2. The Holocaust rippled through Friedlander's life, as he was moved from place to place during the time period (beginning at age 7), including being raised in a Catholic boarding school. He was constantly in a state of assimilation.A Catholic priest steered him towards his Jewish roots. Up to that point he had no strong definition or identification of his Jewishness. He identified with Catholicism. He eventually envelopes Judaism, yet bits of Catholicism were still imbedded within him. For instanc [...]

    3. "Se a volte le nostre reazioni possono sembrare strane, non dovete cadere in errore: dietro la superficie anodina delle parole e delle cose, noi sappiamo che in ogni momento ci insidiano gli abissi." (p. 151)"Quelli che sono discesi, non risalgono mai completamente." (p. 165)

    4. This book and the later documentary film of the same name, by Frank Diamant, serve as an autobiography for Saul Friedländer. Being in the peripheral of the Holocaust as he himself admitted, the author still could not escape the obsession of the disaster, just as he could never left his Jewish identity to live with Catholicism or attained his baccaleaurate but left for Palestine. The book was a joy to read with different time frames, depicting little Saul at different points to explain for his l [...]

    5. The way memory folds back on itself and is inscribed by each remembering; never relies on heightened emotion, but instead remains committed to evoking the haze of remembered experience, no matter how horrifying.

    6. The most desultory memoir! It wanders, jumps, returns to what purpose. It seems to be written from a long way off from the events about the events as each memory appears and after the fact an attempt to be given segues. I read a review of this book, lauding it. No way.

    7. While written first not a great companion to the later volume. At its best when memory of the individual is laced into specific history of the Jewish century. When it works it's great but all to often it doesn't

    8. This memoir written in 1997 looks back at the author's survival of the Holocaust by having been taken into a convent at age of 10 and raised as a Catholic. It switches back and forth between his recounting of his relatively little Jewish upbringing in Prague, separation from his family (who did not survive) during the Holocaust and his views of Israel today. It is not clear how he overcame his total inculcation in the Catholic faith and turning at age of 15 to Zionism. While it is plainly writte [...]

    9. A reread for Yom HaShoah. Friedlander survived as a Catholic boy in France, but a teacher (priest) reconnected him to his Judaism -"didn't your parents die at Auschwitz?" Then he began the painful road back to his Jewish identity: "it took me a long time to find the way back to my own past." In a cruel twist of fate, Friedlander makes Aliyah on the cargo ship "Altalena," and arrives off the coast of Israel on the fateful date of June 20, 1948. He ends his book before the attack: "Out of the dark [...]

    10. This wasn't a bad book but I really can't get into a lot of Holocaust histories because they have no meaning for me. I don't have the collective fear and guilt that Europeans have because that is not part of my family history. We were always a marginalized people and we just learned to adapt and continue living, letting go of the past.

    11. Riveting, wrenching This tale of a young boy, who makes his way without any family through Nazi occupied France and then onto a career as a leading historian, is gripping.

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