Breaking Into Japanese Literature Seven Modern Classics in Parallel Text Reading great books in the original should be the culmination of language study but reading Japanese literature unassisted is a daunting task that can defeat even the most able of students Breaking i

  • Title: Breaking Into Japanese Literature: Seven Modern Classics in Parallel Text
  • Author: Giles Murray
  • ISBN: 9784770028990
  • Page: 291
  • Format: Paperback
  • Reading great books in the original should be the culmination of language study, but reading Japanese literature unassisted is a daunting task that can defeat even the most able of students Breaking into Japanese Literature is specially designed to help you bypass all the frustration and actually enjoy classics of Japanese literature.Breaking into Japanese Literature featReading great books in the original should be the culmination of language study, but reading Japanese literature unassisted is a daunting task that can defeat even the most able of students Breaking into Japanese Literature is specially designed to help you bypass all the frustration and actually enjoy classics of Japanese literature.Breaking into Japanese Literature features seven graded stories covering a variety of genres whether it s the spellbinding surrealism of Natsume Soseki s Ten Nights of Dreams, the humor of Akutagawa Ryunosuke s fable of temple life The Nose , or the excitement of his historic thrillers In a Grove and Rashomon , you are sure to find a story that appeals to you in this collection.The unique layout with the original Japanese story in large print, an easy to follow English translation and a custom dictionary was created for maximum clarity and ease of use There s no need to spend time consulting reference books when everything you need to know is right there in front of your nose.To make Japanese literature fun, Breaking into Japanese Literature also has some unique extra features mini biographies to tell you about the authors lives and works, individual story prefaces to alert you to related works of literature or film, and original illustrations to fire your imagination Best of all, MP3 sound files of all the stories have been made available for FREE on the Internet.Breaking into Japanese Literature provides all the backup you need to break through to a new and undiscovered world the world of great Japanese fiction All the hard work has been taken care of so you can enjoy the pleasures of the mind Why not take advantage Learn o 50% of all common use kanji covered o Kanji entry numbers given for follow up study o Japanese English translation custom dictionary on the same page o Every single kanji word explainedListen o Free download of sound files from the NetLook o 7 original atmospheric illustrationsLink o Original stories for Kurosawa s Rashomon and DreamsAll the stories in this book are available on the Internet as MP3 sound files read by professional Japanese actors.For students who want to consolidate their understanding of kanji, the entry numbers for any of the 2,230 characters in The Kodansha Kanji Learner s Dictionary have been provided when those characters feature in Breaking into Japanese Literature This makes cross referencing a matter of seconds.

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      Published :2018-09-22T04:34:56+00:00

    One thought on “Breaking Into Japanese Literature: Seven Modern Classics in Parallel Text”

    1. Let me refer you to Christian's spot-on review.This book was not that great. But let me start off on a positive note: I enjoyed the stories. The book contains seven short stories in total, by Natsume Sōseki and Ryūnosuke Akutagawa. The selection of stories, content wise, is good. The stories are quite dark, which I love, and I especially like Akutagawa, so reading these stories wasn't boring.Now for the negativeThe aim of this book is to read Japanese literature in the original language. The b [...]

    2. This is a fabulous way to get one's feet wet reading non-textbook Japanese. This book contains 7 short stories, in order of increasing length and complexity, in a bilingual format (Japanese on the left, English on the right). It also has a dictionary for complex or archaic terms used on every page as well as for kanji - every kanji is listed for the first time it appears on the page, along with reference numbers that correspond to the publisher's kanji dictionary. All of these stories are well-k [...]

    3. Occasionally, we find books of selected literary workswith parallel bilingual texts with the translation of the original text on the facing page. But because ofvast differences in the idiom structure and the mode of expression in the Japanese language, the translations areoften not a useful guide to the meaning of words that make up the original text. Giles Murray provides the reader with glosses for nearly every single word foundin the original, appearing both in kanji and kana characters. This [...]

    4. wowieeeeeethese are depressing(but beautiful)this book is very conveniently laid out and i wish a million others like it existed!

    5. I wouldn't recommend it to anyone.First of all, all the stories share some gore/horror atmosphere. Not that it's bad, but for a book advertised simply as "Seven Modern Classics", I don't understand why they chose to go for 7 dark short stories. Second and most important point: those stories are too difficult. Don't get me wrong, I do want to read authentic material and I've already read a handful of Japanese novels (from Haruki Murakami and Banana Yoshimoto), but if you're at a stage where you w [...]

    6. My favourite of these short stories was "In A Grove" by Akutagawa Ryūnosuke. The differences between the characters' stories range from the trivial to the fundamental. The discrepancies between the various characters' testimonies confuses the western reader, and forces you to recognise the fickleness of human memory and integrity.I also enjoyed "10 Nights of Dreams" by Natume Soseki. The surrealistic atmosphere is palpable. Some of the dreams are weird, others are grotesquely funny. The rhythmi [...]

    7. There's no denying it, no other book like this exists. (Except the Snow Country one that came after it.) If you have Japanese friends, they'll tell you that the language and some of the kanji usage is out of date. There are also a couple of minor errors that can lead to momentary major frustration, like the final sentence in English on 203 that actually belongs alongside the Japanese on 204.It doesn't matter. It's worth it a hundred times over. Read through this book and you won't be at the same [...]

    8. As the title of the book implies, this is a good way to start reading modern Japanese literature. Here, "modern" means post Meiji Restoration (1868).It consists of seven short stories: four by Natsume Shoseki (of "I am a Cat" and "Botchan" fame) and three by Akutagawa Ryunosuke. The stories become progressively harder to read through the book.I like the format of the book. Furigana is given above more challenging kanji. Word definitions are given on the lower half of the page and a full translat [...]

    9. This is a really helpful book for intermediate to advanced students of Japanese, particularly because of the vocabulary lists at the bottom, which especially comes in handy when reading authors like Natsume Soseki, who uses some older characters in his writing. Also, listing the The Kodansha Kanji Learner's Dictionary call numbers for every character used in the vocabulary list is incredibly useful. I wish that for some of the more obscure characters that are in the New Japanese-English Characte [...]

    10. A great resource for those studying Japanese, however I really feel it's too advanced for anyone who would actually need a dictionary and direct translation on the page. If you're advanced enough to read the majority of the kanji without the help of furigana, you're certainly not using readers such as this. I wish there had been more furigana use within the original Japanese text so those with a strong vocabulary could still enjoy the book without the tediousness of consulting the dictionary wit [...]

    11. A bit too much for the average Japanese student, it nevertheless shows why you should hang in there and continue the struggle in learning how to read Japanese. Maybe the best Japanese short stories that for the exception of Rashamon the world has yet to acknowledge. In the end, the Japanese student will be glad he or she stuck with it. The kanji that is not common here actually are quite easy to understand, provided you have a great teacher like me. I was lucky to have had the greatest kanji tea [...]

    12. A good parallel-text for Japanese stories, that made me realize just how few common-use kanji I can actually recognizeA big help are the audio recordings for each story. (Even if the narrators do sometime pronounce words/kanji differently than how they're shown in the text.)The one shortcoming/downside is that all seven stories come from only two authors. This doesn't provide for much variety in style or time (since the original publishing dates range from just 1908 to 1922). Although the dictio [...]

    13. I really enjoyed reading the short stories in this book. Each story has vocabulary words in Japanese and English, and the stories are translated in Japanese and English. I lent this book to one of my Japanese co-workers, and she told me that the Japanese text is a little difficult to understand because it uses old prose. The English text also uses old prose, but it's not as difficult to understand. If you're studying Japanese, you'll learn a lot of "new" old words, even in kanji (Chinese charact [...]

    14. This is absolutely the best way of getting through japanese literature in the original language. I almost never read the english translation, the vocabulary listed under each page was enough to understand. The sense of accomplishment after FINALLY being able to read fiction in japanese without becoming frustrated is great! I shall not stop now. It's both a great way to practice the language and learn, and great stories, very carefully written. Being able to understand them in japanese really add [...]

    15. Read the first part in Japanese, then switched to English and finished in less than an hour. There was just too much ingrained misogyny in the author bios and the introduction to each story. The whole thing was just an endless reminder of taking English Lit courses and finding the whole reading list is dead white men, of my fifth grade teacher stating that no more classics will ever be written, of the pervasive belief that somebody needs to be miserable for literature to mean anything.

    16. A pain-free way for the Japanese learner to be able to read text in the original Japanese. Lots of furigana means you aren't going to be memorizing many new kanji, but a good, accessible selection of short stories from renowned authors.

    17. This is a great tool. The characters and translation are at the bottom and each page is translated next to the original text. You can highlight to your hearts desire. It's easy to translate and the repetetive characters make it a great early reader.

    18. This book, its successor, and the two "Read Real Japanese" books are terrific for getting into written Japanese. It _is_ really hard, but gets easier with regular practice.

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