A Song for Quiet Deacon James is a rambling bluesman straight from Georgia a black man with troubles that he can t escape and music that won t let him go On a train to Arkham he meets trouble visions of nightmares

  • Title: A Song for Quiet
  • Author: Cassandra Khaw
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 367
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Deacon James is a rambling bluesman straight from Georgia, a black man with troubles that he can t escape, and music that won t let him go On a train to Arkham, he meets trouble visions of nightmares, gaping mouths and grasping tendrils, and a madman who calls himself John Persons According to the stranger, Deacon is carrying a seed in his head, a thing that will destrDeacon James is a rambling bluesman straight from Georgia, a black man with troubles that he can t escape, and music that won t let him go On a train to Arkham, he meets trouble visions of nightmares, gaping mouths and grasping tendrils, and a madman who calls himself John Persons According to the stranger, Deacon is carrying a seed in his head, a thing that will destroy the world if he lets it hatch.The mad ravings chase Deacon to his next gig His saxophone doesn t call up his audience from their seats, it calls up monstrosities from across dimensions As Deacon flees, chased by horrors and cultists, he stumbles upon a runaway girl, who is trying to escape her father, and the destiny he has waiting for her Like Deacon, she carries something deep inside her, something twisted and dangerous Together, they seek to leave Arkham, only to find the Thousand Young lurking in the woods.The song in Deacon s head is growing stronger, and soon he won t be able to ignore it any .

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      Posted by:Cassandra Khaw
      Published :2018-07-13T05:00:24+00:00

    One thought on “A Song for Quiet”

    1. Shortly after the death of his father, bluesman Deacon James rolls into Arkham with an otherworldly song in his head and a sinister detective, John Persons, on his trailI follow Cassandra Khaw on twitter and she mentioned needing reviews for this. Since I liked her first John Persons novella, Hammers on Bone, I was all over it like a ghoul on an unsuspecting citizen of Arkham.Noir mixed with cosmic horror is the best combo since chocolate and peanut butter and A Song for Quiet is a prime example [...]

    2. Just so you know, Cassandra Khaw's work is my aesthetic. I mean this 100%. This book makes me hurt with how viscerally, disgustingly, triumphantly good it is. It's Lovecraft elevated to human art instead of just dry cosmic musings; the characters in this book are so real you ache for them, you feel your own bile rise as they confront nameless horror. There is a such a strong thread of call-and-answer in this story, questions characters ask being asked of the reader as well, sacrifices the charac [...]

    3. A lyrical, deeply weird horror novella about a bluesman with a song in his head that will end the world (and since he's black in 1950s USA, you can see the temptation). As with the best horror, humanity comes across as pretty much as awful as the Old Ones with tentacles, although those are also spectacularly grim. Khaw's writing is incredibly rich, with the saturation turned up to 100 all the time to dizzying effect, and her knack for vividly revolting images has not deserted her (insert canniba [...]

    4. Lyrical prose and interesting enough story about a bluesman on a train with something going on in his head, and creatures doing anything to retrieve it. Never read the 1st so not sure if any different but just didnt work as a novella for me.

    5. Words, so many well-chosen words. Cassandra Khaw is really freakin' great at painting a picture with words. A Song for Quiet unspooled like a movie in my brain. It's dark, creepy, not afraid of going to places that hurt. I do wish we got to spend more time between those pages, though. But hey, I'm greedy.

    6. Deacon James is a blues man. Not the stereotypical figure of a blues man either. There's no deals done at crossroads, no careful deployment of artfully vague music as magic. Deacon is good at what he does, famous enough to be a little noticed, and folded in half with grief.Deacon is also in the wrong place at the right time, his grief and anger combining with something truly monstrous and propelling him into the centre of a situation so vast he can only perceive some of it. A situation that John [...]

    7. I am reviewing both books in the Persons Non Grata series at the same time (this one and Hammers on Bone). I have spent the year trying to read things I don't usually, horror and novellas, and honestly, I am kind of glad I did.I recently told a friend of mine, (Hey Dan) I thought that some writers did Lovecraft better than Lovecraft did himself (weird sentence there) Ms. Khaw happens to be one of them. As a reader who enjoys the Chulthu mythos more than the actual Lovecraft works, I love the fac [...]

    8. Unnerving Magazine ReviewThough the second of a series, ​​A Song for Quiet reveals a significantly different tale from its predecessor. Firstly, it’s not a hardboiled detective noir, despite involving that character. This fact was somewhat disappointing, at least initially until I got over my expectations.A hard-up bluesman is torn between a subconscious cosmic tugging and the difficult world around him. That's the sum of it until the threat of complete world annihilation comes into pla [...]

    9. Khaw has a brilliant and awesome grasp of language usage and i love how she uses music and its terminology throughout this tale Cthulhu-inspired works take a tough road, as some authors have near-mastered the worlds of The Old Ones and make dipping ones tentacles there to be fraught with failure and/or overwrought writing Khaw succeeds admirably, fantastically, viscerally her descriptives flow, nay ooze, with menace and awfulness a grand adventure, touching and raw and dreary and dark

    10. A grieving blue singer starts to feel an urge to sing a song that could destroy the world. Beautifully written tale of grief and hope and the language Khaw uses go paint this picture is gorgeous - her ability to paint music into words is really unique to read. Strongly recommended!

    11. 4.5 stars; different from the first one but just as good.What. A. Book.I've never read anything similar to this novella series. Not only because Lovecraftian Noir and Lovecraftian Southern Gothic aren't everyone's favorite genres, but also because I'm not sure you can easily find horror written this well.A Song for Quiet is the second book in the Persons Non Grata series, but it's set long before Hammers on Bone. Its main character is a black bluesman, Deacon James, whose music just won't let hi [...]

    12. Another creepy but also lovely entry in Persons Non Grata from Khaw. Deacon James is a blues player who's being haunted by an unearthly song in his head, and being chased by people--and things--who want it. It turns out he's not the only one hearing the song. Some horrific weird, but not without hope or redemption.

    13. I don't think it's possible for Cassandra Khaw to write a story that I don't find rich and engaging. This is dark, clever, brutal and gorgeous all at once.

    14. Cassandra Khaw is a really, really good writer. And this story is fascinating. But. it's too complete to be a short story and too incomplete to be a novella. The reader isn't allowed far enough into the world to appreciate the greater arc at play.

    15. So I guess "Lovecraftian Novella" is a genre all it's own now, this being the third one I've read in the last twelve months. I can't say that I enjoyed this one as much as The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe or The Ballad of Black Tom. A Song for Quiet treads some of the same ground as Black Tom, but it's more overtly horror than either of the others I've read. Cassandra Khaw has a knack for drumming up tension, but she's also got a love of florid language that sometimes goes over the top. The story [...]

    16. This novella I bought,read because i was intrigued by the bluesman protagonist,the jazz element mixed with the supernatural horror story. The mix of jazz, horror didn't disappoint and I was impressed with poetic language the writer used when writing about horrific atmosphere as well as the music imagery, the complex feelings of Decon James being a black man playing music in Jim Crow era.

    17. The magic of music.There's something irresistible about stories in which music reshapes reality, be it instruments conjuring stories of sound and light, Jazz feeding the supernatural, lullabies to die for, or, like here, a song demanding to be heard, demanding to be sung.Bluesman Deacon James hasn't asked for the song in his head, but now it's there, and it's ravenous to get out.A Song for Quiet shares some surface similarities with Victor LaValle's The Ballad of Black Tom: both stories deal wit [...]

    18. I had been anxiously waiting for this book, and it did not disappoint. In what I feel might be events that transpire before "Hammers on Bone" (I'll gladly reread to test that theory), we follow Deacon James, a bluesman from Georgia, as he copes with loss, pain, and visions from beyond. Something is growing inside him, and his music, a part of him that is wound deep into who he is, becomes a conduit for it. Unlike the first book, we see Persons in the periphery of the story and not as the main ch [...]

    19. Cassandra Khaw’s novella A Song for Quiet begins with the protagonist, musician, saxophonist, bluesman Deacon James, on his way home from his father’s funeral, on a night train headed for Arkham. And it ends with a young black woman, who wanted to end the world because living in it hurt so much - but didn’t.There’s something about H. P. Lovecraft that makes people want to engage in literary conversation with his work. While he was still alive, writers like Robert Howard, Clark Ashton Smi [...]

    20. The great thing about Khaw's writing is that it makes you feel the way that a haunting musical piece feels, at least for me. There's a melody to every line, even if the notes have dismembered appendages attached and the long notes are being sustained by something not all together human. When I heard about Deacon James, the blues playing protagonist to the second Persons story, I was immediately intrigued by the perfect pairing of writer and character.I don't want to spoil too much, but lets just [...]

    21. I can't exactly say that I was wrong about Khaw's previous entry in this series (Hammers On Bone) when I gave it three stars, but a sequel this good does make me feel like either I grossly undervalued the original or this is one of the best improvements between instalments I've ever seen.The bulk of A Song for Quiet is about Deacon James, a bluesman who's not so much down on his luck as his luck is down on him. Grieving his father, suffering from a music gnawing through his head, running from a [...]

    22. I want to say I loved this little book, the second in Cassandraw Khaw’s Persons Non Grata series, but the truth is that I am just Lovecraft-homaged-out these days, which made it a tough read for me. That said, A Song for Quiet is a definite improvement upon Khaw’s previous Lovecraftian novella, Hammers on Bone. It’s better paced, with a more interesting main character in Deacon James, and it does a much better job of capturing the sense of truly cosmic horror that Lovecraft was known for. [...]

    23. Absolutely electrifying. Khaw takes off in this novel, this time in the third person, and never relents. Astonishing, lighting-fast Lovecraft-noir prose that is as grim as it is artful. A paean to the Elder Gods.Only two points of contention for me: what is the setting? That it's set 65+ years before present is a bit too easy to miss. It's a point of ambiguity that shows the only slight trouble Khaw may have with her prose: that she rockets so fast in story and style that important, relevant not [...]

    24. With this book Persons Non Grata has to be my favorite Lovecraftian seriesever and probably two of the best takes on Lovecraftian themes I've ever read. Khaw does a great job mining Lovecraft for the horror and elevating it to include human interest and societal messages, which are rarely done well in this genre. Cosmic horror is so much more when a reader can focus on one life and then the horror is expanded outward from there. Without the reflection of how tiny we are, how can we grasp the hor [...]

    25. A decent enough sequel, though I must say I think Hammers On Bone was a lot more interesting and engaging than this was. Part of it may also be that this is almost the exact same story as Black Tom, but Black Tom is 1000X better, not that this is bad per se, but just that Black Tom is longer, richer, deeper, and written by a black man, so it speaks a little more directly to the exact subject matter than Cassandra can. I like supporting Cassandra's work and gladly read this, but I look forward to [...]

    26. khaw is so good. so so good. she truly finds new and fresh ways to description, ones i haven't read before. she propels the story forward with sharp and intense sensations, turns of phrase that i lingered over again, relishing in how delectably and carefully her word choices are made. (view spoiler)[the ending did leave me wanting, though. i really liked deacon as a character, and though i guess i knew that he couldn't survive this tale, i really wanted him to. (hide spoiler)]coming back for sur [...]

    27. Review by Dave Robbins of The Brazen Bull:Tor is continuing the trend of releasing stand-alone short fiction. I suspect that at some point A Song for Quiet and others will be collected in one volume and re-released. With this novella taking place in Arkham, Massachusetts, we find an emulation and confrontation of the H.P. Lovecraft legacy that captures both manifestations of unease with entrancing subtlety. I liked this storyClick the link to continue reading: thebrazenbull/books/song-q

    28. At only 103 pages it doesn’t seem like it could hold much depth but holy shit those 103 pages are brilliant from the first to the last. It’s the Music of Erich Zann from the musicians point of view and played through a saxophone. It accomplishes more in that space than most full novels do in 4 times that. It packs a full character arc, fleshed out characters, a full plot, insightful commentary on the plight of black people in the 30’s, and manages to be appropriately Lovecraftian all while [...]

    29. The Devil is pretty synonymous with Blues so its not surprising when other eldritch horrors might be drawn to it too. This story is about a depressed man in a depressing situation who also happens to play the blues, which are actually three great things that go great together when you get paid to do depressing music. Things get slightly more complicated when world ending demons come into play. Its worth noting that this story manages to be both depressing and yet uplifting in the end. A sad kind [...]

    30. Review by Dave Robbins of The Brazen Bull:Tor is continuing the trend of releasing stand-alone short fiction. I suspect that at some point A Song for Quiet and others will be collected in one volume and re-released. With this novella taking place in Arkham, Massachusetts, we find an emulation and confrontation of the H.P. Lovecraft legacy that captures both manifestations of unease with entrancing subtlety. I liked this storyClick the link to continue reading: thebrazenbull/books/song-q

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