Intruder in the Dark Miss Melody Johnson an old unmarried lady dies in the strange village of Plumpton Bois Once a busy and prosperous place it is now almost deserted Miss Johnson leaves her family home Johnsons Place

  • Title: Intruder in the Dark
  • Author: George Bellairs
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 472
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Miss Melody Johnson, an old unmarried lady, dies in the strange village of Plumpton Bois Once a busy and prosperous place, it is now almost deserted Miss Johnson leaves her family home, Johnsons Place, to her sole surviving relative who cannot wait to inspect the property, but in doing so, is murdered by an intruder hiding in the cellar The local police officials can tMiss Melody Johnson, an old unmarried lady, dies in the strange village of Plumpton Bois Once a busy and prosperous place, it is now almost deserted Miss Johnson leaves her family home, Johnsons Place, to her sole surviving relative who cannot wait to inspect the property, but in doing so, is murdered by an intruder hiding in the cellar The local police officials can t agree on the motive for the crime Some say a casual burglary, other something subtle although Miss Johnson was reputed wealthy, her declared estate was worth next to nothing What had happened to her fortune The Chief Constable sent for Scotland Yard to settle the argument Superintendent Littlejohn and Inspector Cromwell set about the mystery and bring to light some strange facts both about the Johnson family, and other inhabitants of Plumpton Bois Littlejohn draws the many threads closer, but another sudden death threatens to break the strands and provide the killer with a way of escape

    • ☆ Intruder in the Dark || ✓ PDF Read by À George Bellairs
      472 George Bellairs
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ Intruder in the Dark || ✓ PDF Read by À George Bellairs
      Posted by:George Bellairs
      Published :2018-08-07T23:26:19+00:00

    One thought on “Intruder in the Dark”

    1. I would like to thank Netgalley and Ipso Books for a review copy of Intruder In The Dark, a police procedural featuring Chief Superintendent Littlejohn originally published in 1966.Cyril Savage is murdered when visiting the house he inherited from his estranged great aunt Melody Johnson. The local police suspect a vagrant but the Chief Constable thinks there is more to it and calls in Scotland Yard in the form of Chief Superintendent Littlejohn and Inspector Cromwell. It turns out the Chief Cons [...]

    2. I’m getting to like George Bellairs’ books. They are classic crime novels with enough character development and delineation to keep this reader engaged. Bellairs avoids stereotypes, while historical assumptions occasionally bring a smile. The plot is plausible and the puzzle well created . I’m pleased to have read this one.

    3. 4 starsMr. and Mrs. Cecil Savage drive to the village of Plumpton Bois to see the house that Mr. Savage has inherited for the first time from his aunt, Miss Melody Johnson. At one time, the village was busy with people, but now it seems almost deserted. Mr. Savage is an intemperate man, impatient and easy to anger. He becomes frustrated at not being able to open a door in the house and breaks the lock. As he opens the door, he is hit in the head and killed. Locals about the village disagree abou [...]

    4. Another very well done vintage detective story.Yet again we have a typical Bellaire story. A good plot, well organised, and not immediately obvious. Some delightful turns of phrase although I could have done with a little less descriptive frenzy about some of the characters. Nonetheless worthwhile.

    5. What a pleasure to be offered a digital copy of “Intruder in the Dark” by George Bellairs by Crime Classics in return for an honest review. This is the third of this rather neglected author’s great detective novels I’ve read and I’ve become a fan. To me he rates on a par with Agarha Christie or Marjory Allingham any day but hasn’t had their continued exposure. His books don’t pretend to be anything more than pure entertainment but are so well written. They feature Inspector Littlej [...]

    6. Cyril Savage inherits his estranged aunt's house Johnsons Place. Unfortunately he disturbs a burglar and is killed for his trouble. Superintendent Littlejohn and Inspector Cromwell are called in to investigate. Many of the locals are convinced it was a vagrant but Littlejohn is not convinced. He thinks the answer to the mystery may be from the Johnson family history. Melody Johnson suffered a broken engagement to Dave Hubbard who is back living in the village. She left her money to her lawyer Je [...]

    7. Another great book by George Bellairs, this time Littlejohn is again teamed up with his able assistant Cromwell and they are called to Plumpton Bois where a Mr Savage is murdered whilst inspecting a home he has just inherited. It is worth noting that there may be something in the water as almost all the local men we meet have got tempers but this does increase the humour that Mr Bellairs is so good at. The twists will keep you guessing till the end and every page will leave you wanting to stay a [...]

    8. A tidy mystery in which the murder investigation gets briskly underway - a method that allows Mr. Bellairs to get down to the sordid bits of small village life (truly a bugaboo for the Littlejohn mysteries) but also provides us a victim who the reader doesn't know from a can of paint. But is that the point of Mr. Bellairs' novels? The more I read of them, the more I think he embraces fully what other writers sort of dance around; a truly hateful murder victim that the reader is not invested in A [...]

    9. George Bellaire is good on his descriptions of both characters and place but I have two issues with this book. The first is that in this day and age I find the use of the word 'coon' totally unacceptable especially when it could easily be replaced with another word without changing any of the atmosphere of the book. The second issue is I have just read another of his books and I found some of his characters to be quite similar, mainly the lawyer and publican, and also although the locations were [...]

    10. Classic British Golden Age mystery. Not quite a cozy, but closer to Miss Marple than Poirot. This is a police procedural that depends more on relationships than forensics. Getting to know local history, gossip and help from the area constable are critical for resolution - but you still get all the clues to figure it out before the end. Charming and great fun!

    11. A wonderful golden age mystery. Set in a small British town that has become a week Enders, summer retreat after the close of the lead and silver mines. Great nephew comes to town to check out the house he inherited and gets bopped on the head. Who done it? In comes Littlejohn to find the culprit among the quirky residents. This is my first Bellairs but it won't be my last.

    12. Thoroughly enjoyed this murder mystery taking place in England. Very well written. Plenty of detail to completely set the scenes, with excellent descriptions to firmly place a good picture in my mind.I received an Advance Reader Copy from Crime Classics. The opinions are my own.

    13. I had never heard of this author, but I found a bunch of his books on the Kindle Unlimited program and thought I should try this one out. Apparently I now have 44 more books to look forward to from this author. This book was published in 1956 per the bibliography (georgebellairs/bibliog ) and has the language and presentation style of having been written decades earlier. The series did start in 1941, so I am guessing he stayed with a winning strategy. Descriptions of people in the small remote v [...]

    14. A very British murder mystery with a very fifties feel about it  (although set in the sixties). The villagers are colourful but not over the top.And it is a relief to meet a Superintendent  and his Inspector who do not have drinking problems, a messy private life, plenty of chips on their shoulders and are not socially inadequate. And let's face it, a murder happening in a remote village is most of the time a winner. 

    15. I have now read a dozen Bellairs' books and find them unfailingly interesting.Littlejohn and Cromwell are good foils yet again and this outing has them involved in a nicely convoluted story of a missing fortune-and a murder or two .Add a cast of eccentric characters in an odd country setting and you have a classic Bellairs situation.Most enjoyable and entertaining

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