Bloodlines Odyssey of a Native Daughter These autobiographical essays by a member of the Coeur d Alene tribe interweave personal experiences with striking portraits of relatives both living and dead to form a rich tapestry of history sto

  • Title: Bloodlines: Odyssey of a Native Daughter
  • Author: Janet Campbell Hale
  • ISBN: 9780816518449
  • Page: 241
  • Format: Paperback
  • These autobiographical essays by a member of the Coeur d Alene tribe interweave personal experiences with striking portraits of relatives, both living and dead, to form a rich tapestry of history, storytelling, and remembrance Hale s is a story of intense and resonant beauty Breathtaking in its range and authority, Bloodlines is an important addition to the literature ofThese autobiographical essays by a member of the Coeur d Alene tribe interweave personal experiences with striking portraits of relatives, both living and dead, to form a rich tapestry of history, storytelling, and remembrance Hale s is a story of intense and resonant beauty Breathtaking in its range and authority, Bloodlines is an important addition to the literature of women of color.

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      241 Janet Campbell Hale
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      Posted by:Janet Campbell Hale
      Published :2018-06-20T16:53:20+00:00

    One thought on “Bloodlines: Odyssey of a Native Daughter”

    1. Hale writes about her own family history in this novel. This book is soooo well-written. She interweaves her own experience with striking portraits of her relatives, both living and dead in lyrical prose. A searing novel. Made me think about how we are all connected--the children to their fathers and the fathers to their children. We without our ancestors cannot be saved, and they without us cannot be saved.

    2. This was a difficult book to read. It's part fiction and part autobiography. If even HALF of what is written in the book is true, the author went through nothing short of a living hell until she was about 24 or so. That she was able to get out of the cycle of abuse by family and spouses, attend college and make a life for herself and her child is nothing short of amazing.Her descriptions of the abuse she put up with as a child makes my own growing-up years look like a wonderful dream.

    3. This was a somewhat disjointed collection of essays about the author's experiences growing up as an Indian in the Pacific Northwest, the discrimination she experienced and the influence her family and their history had on her. It was eye-opening for me as a white person living in the same area with little or no contact and less understanding of Native Americans.

    4. First rate memoir of a Salishan Native American. It's a tearjerker, but also an inspiring chronical of a very resilient and yes, heroic woman who has taken life's scars and emerged insightful, which is more than most of us can say. Highly rec'd.

    5. School book? Yup. Good? Actually, yes. This was one of those wonderful moments when you pick up a school book to read the assigned chapter and then end up reading the entire book. It was a good companion with what we were studying, but I enjoyed it in general.

    6. Essays by Janet Campbell Hale, a member of the Coeur d'Alene tribe. From the book's blurb, " a rich tapestry of history, storytelling, and remembrance." Really, those few words say so much. This is a wonderful book, heartbreaking but well worth the read (and re-read).

    7. A large part of the book deals with Hale's troubled relationship with her mother without Hale sounding like she's whining. She also wove in her tribe's history and her only personal family history well.

    8. In this book, Hale writes about her family history and childhood in Idaho, Washington and Montana, which was especially interesting to me. After learning about the background of this author, I'd like to read her other work.

    9. The back of the paperback quotes the Sante Fe New Mexican's review, "Anguished, searing, and unflinching." To that I would add, "Full of anger and indignancy."

    10. a little repetitive but good-full of the challenges of an abusive and overly mobile childhood set against a Pacific northwest native background.

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