The Invention of Angela Carter A Biography Angela Carter is widely acknowledged as one of the most important and beguiling writers of the last century Her work stands out for its bawdiness and linguistic zest its hospitality to the fantastic

  • Title: The Invention of Angela Carter: A Biography
  • Author: Edmund Gordon
  • ISBN: 9780701187552
  • Page: 427
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Angela Carter is widely acknowledged as one of the most important and beguiling writers of the last century Her work stands out for its bawdiness and linguistic zest, its hospitality to the fantastic and the absurd, and its extraordinary inventiveness and range Her life was as modern and as unconventional as anything in her fiction.Born Angela Olive Stalker in EastbourneAngela Carter is widely acknowledged as one of the most important and beguiling writers of the last century Her work stands out for its bawdiness and linguistic zest, its hospitality to the fantastic and the absurd, and its extraordinary inventiveness and range Her life was as modern and as unconventional as anything in her fiction.Born Angela Olive Stalker in Eastbourne in 1940, her story spans the latter half of the twentieth century After escaping an oppressive childhood and a difficult early marriage, the success of her first novels enable the freedoms of travel journeying across America in a Greyhound bus, and then on to Tokyo, where she lived for three transformative years before settling in London to write her last, great novels, amid the joys of late motherhood and prestigious teaching posts abroad By the time of her tragic and untimely death at the age of fifty one, she was firmly established as an iconoclastic writer whose fearlessly original work had reinvigorated the literary landscape and inspired a new generation.This is the story of how Angela Carter invented herself as a new kind of woman and a new kind of writer and how she came to write such seductive works as The Bloody Chamber, Nights at the Circus and Wise Children Edmund Gordon has followed in Carter s footsteps to uncover a life rich in incident and adventure With unrestricted access to her manuscripts, letters and journals, and informed by dozens of interviews with her friends and family, this major biography offers a definitive portrait of one of our most dazzling writers.

    • ☆ The Invention of Angela Carter: A Biography || Ì PDF Download by ☆ Edmund Gordon
      427 Edmund Gordon
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Invention of Angela Carter: A Biography || Ì PDF Download by ☆ Edmund Gordon
      Posted by:Edmund Gordon
      Published :2019-02-18T17:40:51+00:00

    One thought on “The Invention of Angela Carter: A Biography”

    1. BOTWbbc/programmes/b07x20bvDescription: Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography about one of English literature's most inventive writers. This is the first authorised biography of Angela Carter since her death almost twenty five years ago. Edmund Gordon has interviewed close friends, collaborators, lovers and family members, and had access to her journals, letters and manuscripts and so created a vivid portrait of her unconventional and extraordinary life.Growing UpBristolJapanLoveBeing Loved

    2. A little too much on her sex life, and not enough on her work for me, but as this is the only bio we have at present of this wonderful writer and wonderful human, it will have to do. Now go read her!

    3. 'Why should anyone be interested in my boring, alienated, marginal, messy life?' Angela Carter, 1981After her death in 1992, Angela Carter received the greatest acclaim of her career. It was like a volcano, long dormant, suddenly erupting. She was 'the benevolent white witch' of English letters, an 'oracle', a 'high sorceress', 'always on the verge of bestowing something - some talisman, some magic token you'd need to get through the dark forest, some verbal formula useful for opening of charmed [...]

    4. From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography about one of English literature's most inventive writers. This is the first authorised biography of Angela Carter since her death almost twenty five years ago. Edmund Gordon has interviewed close friends, collaborators, lovers and family members, and had access to her journals, letters and manuscripts and so created a vivid portrait of her unconventional and extraordinary life.Read by Emma FieldingAbridged by Sara DaviesP [...]

    5. I feel somewhat bereft that this is over. Gordon writes towards the end that writing this biography was a "strange and somewhat eerie process: a haunting, but there were times when I didn't know if the ghost was Angela, or me". I feel the that strange haunting; because this was a big book, and because I've gotten slower with my reading over the years, I set myself a deadline to finish by June 30, or else I know it would drag on forever, me wanting to drag out Angela Carter's story as long as I c [...]

    6. Both very readable and enlightening (how many great writers worked in a shop with five novels under their belt?), this isn't quite sure-footed enough for *****, but not all that far off.

    7. The long awaited biography of my literary role model. I'm happy that Gordon chose to use a chronological narrative because that's exactly what was missing from the corpus about her so far. However, I'm waiting for the one writjng about Carter on her terms: the fantastical with a hint of Gonzo Journalism, fiction always on the premises, and filled with the sources of inspiration that Carter devoured. I'm waiting for that one. In the meanwhile, this one is good. Get to know Angela Carter. Read thi [...]

    8. So thrilled to see a biography of the great Angela Carter had been penned, read it with great interest and enjoyment and sadness. I miss all the stories she might have written this last quarter century, and was tantalised by the story of Adele that was never to be. Good, solid biography.

    9. 7 OCT 2016 - a recommendation through Laura. Thank you, Dear Friend. From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography about one of English literature's most inventive writers. This is the first authorised biography of Angela Carter since her death almost twenty five years ago. Edmund Gordon has interviewed close friends, collaborators, lovers and family members, and had access to her journals, letters and manuscripts and so created a vivid portrait of her unconventional [...]

    10. I know I'll be recommending this one. I'll be giving this book some thought for a couple of days, but I will be back with a post soon.

    11. I'm enjoying the fascinating stories and perspectives so far. But not passages like this:This was the first time Angela had travelled alone, and the seething, neon-corrupted spectacle of Tokyo would have given even the most seasoned adventurer pause.No, it doesn't appear to be a quote from another source.There are also a number of gossip queen-style tangents, with tenuous connections to Carter's life. For example, we get over half a page (p. 294) on Harry Brewster, his accent, his skin (!), his [...]

    12. It's always dangerous to read a biography (or watch a documentary) about one of your idols. For example, it took me several years to enjoy Chet Baker again after seeing "Let's Get Lost" – which obliterated the image I'd had of him as a golden crooner. A hundred pages into The Invention of Angela Carter I was afraid I'd end up disliking her too. Happily, I was wrong, possibly because I've never imagined her as a white witch or fairy godmother. I'd relished The Sadeian Woman and Expletives Delet [...]

    13. I don't normally cry at the end of biographies (even when the subject didn't live to a ripe old age), but I was quite devastated when I reached the final chapter, dealing with Carter's cancer and subsequent death at the age of 52. This excellent biography takes a generous and even-handed approach to Carter's life and work, succeeding in its aim to 'demythologise' Angela Carter and disrupt the image of her as a twinkly fairy godmother with witchy white hair. Although Gordon doesn't shy away from [...]

    14. From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography about one of English literature's most inventive writers. This is the first authorised biography of Angela Carter since her death almost twenty five years ago. Edmund Gordon has interviewed close friends, collaborators, lovers and family members, and had access to her journals, letters and manuscripts and so created a vivid portrait of her unconventional and extraordinary life.Read by Emma FieldingAbridged by Sara DaviesP [...]

    15. For anyone with an interest in the life and works of Angela Carter, I recommend this book: interesting, engaging, well-written.

    16. A comprehensive and astute biography of Angela Carter, which draws on a range of sources, including her journals, letters, interviews with her friends, family and professional associates, and travels to many of the places where she spent her life. Of course, it also makes explicit biographical links between her experiences and her (creative) works, sometimes with interesting results, and other times well, I think it's always a mistake to treat a writer's work as a concordance, seeking their psy [...]

    17. I felt that Gordon had a bit too much young writer’s admiration for his subject to portray Carter as a truly complex human (even though this was exactly the central mission of his book). Plus, I thought he pussyfooted too much around her relationships with people who are still alive, like her son. As a result, the depiction of Carter's last 15 years or so is quite flat and the tragedy of her illness and early death seem to be glossed over. Having said all this, there is lots to love about this [...]

    18. Angela Carter is pretty high on my list of favorite authors, so I was delighted to see this book. Her stories refuse to fit neatly into any one genre; they have humor, magical realism, pure fantasy, literary fiction, grim fairy tales, and a lot more. She also wrote tons of journalism pieces, and had a huge volume of correspondence (which was one of the many sources Gordon mined). Her early novels are not much known these days, but her later ones- ‘Wise Children’ and ‘Nights at the Circus [...]

    19. " 'I seem to be on a lot of people's mailing lists. I get a lot of stuff asking me to subscribe to anti-pornography groups, and others asking me to subscribe to pro-pornography groups, but very little actual pornography.' "Scrupulously researched and brilliantly executed, I'm not sure anyone could hope for a more sympathetic biographer than Gordon. This is a large book, but never unwieldy, and so engaging that it reads almost like fiction. And a sense of loss hangs about the last few chapters, a [...]

    20. One of the first things to leap out at me from this book is how ridiculous it was that Angela Carter was called Angela Carter. She was born Stalker, and wouldn't that just have been a much better name for all those tales of wolves and witches? Even her mother's maiden name, Farthing, has something of the appropriate Dickensian, music hall sensibility. Instead, because of when she lived, the stolid and entirely inapt Carter from her rather deadening first husband. But then, in itself that's oddly [...]

    21. I'll admit I'd never heard of Angela Carter before the review of this book appeared in NYRB, and Carter's style of novels really doesn't appeal to me, but this is the best biography of a writer I've read in a long time. Edmund Gordon manages to make Carter come alive, although she has been dead for 25 years. Making a biography subject come alive does not sound like a remarkable accomplishment, but it really is, and in this case it also does justice to Carter's appetite for life. We get a good id [...]

    22. When I chose this book to read, I had no idea who Angela Carter was and had never read any of her books. I vaguely recall the title, The Company of Wolves and that it was a movie, and that was it. Then a few days after pondering whether to order this biography, I heard an NPR Fresh Air episode on the this book, the author and his subject, Angela Carter. I have ordered one of her books from the library but have yet to receive it. I appreciate learning about Angela Carter and her life. I appreciat [...]

    23. Gobbled down this biography. Adore Angela Carter, the fabulous fabulist, a unique talent. Her life here is a characteristically strange mix of contented domesticity, woman trapped by convention, and utterly surreal. Edmund Gordon's book was thorough in research and in detail, and also humble, evidently wanting to do his best by his subject. For all the 'warts and all' portrait presented, the admiration comes across.

    24. Somehow I have managed to never read anything by Angela Carter, despite my literary anglophilia. I enjoyed this biography, though, and am now eying Wise Children and Nights at the Circus curiously.I didn't find this biography particularly insightful or well-written, but it served as a reasonably engaging introduction to Carter's life and work.

    25. As soon as I got to the line that said she died, something cracked in me like water sloshing ice, this cold realization that she is gone. My face keeps scrunching up from restrained sobs. I knew I was going to tear up, but I didn't expect the racking of cries in my chest. I am so lucky to have read this book on an amazing woman and brilliant writer.

    26. I read this for book group. I don't know if I would have finished it but for that. It was well-written, but I really didn't like Angela Carter, as she came through in this telling of her life. But it was worth reading--given that I hadn't known about her at all.

    27. I listened to an abridged version From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:Edmund Gordon's illuminating biography about one of English literature's most inventive writers. This is the first authorised biography of Angela Carter since her death almost twenty five years ago. Edmund Gordon has interviewed close friends, collaborators, lovers and family members, and had access to her journals, letters and manuscripts and so created a vivid portrait of her unconventional and extraordinary life.She is a ge [...]

    28. ' is a haunted house and I am the ghost inside, trapped in the exquisite misery of youth-'We travel along the thread of narrative like high-wire artistes. That is our life'.'Eden is always evil''the management regrets it is unable to serve chips alone''Any paper parcel is beautiful''He who was Ariel is now Caliban & was always both'.' paradoxical propriety and primnrss'

    29. Really liked this. Actually made me quite emotional at the end. I'm really glad to have learnt more about Angela Carter.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *