The Ages Of Gaia A Biography Of Our Living Earth Open the cover and bathe in great draughts of air that excitingly argue the case that the earth is alive David Bellamy ObserverIn his first book Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth James Lovelock prop

  • Title: The Ages Of Gaia: A Biography Of Our Living Earth
  • Author: James E. Lovelock
  • ISBN: 9780192860903
  • Page: 410
  • Format: None
  • Open the cover and bathe in great draughts of air that excitingly argue the case that the earth is alive David Bellamy, ObserverIn his first book, Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth, James Lovelock proposed a startling new theory of life Existing theories held that plants and animals evolve on, but are distinct from, an inanimate planet James Lovelock s theory, Gaia, shOpen the cover and bathe in great draughts of air that excitingly argue the case that the earth is alive David Bellamy, ObserverIn his first book, Gaia A New Look at Life on Earth, James Lovelock proposed a startling new theory of life Existing theories held that plants and animals evolve on, but are distinct from, an inanimate planet James Lovelock s theory, Gaia, showed that Earth, its rocks, oceans, and atmosphere, and all living things are part of one great organism, evolving over the vast span of geological time Much scientific work has since confirmed Lovelock s theory this new book, Lovelock elaborates the basis of a new and unified view of the earth and life sciences, discussing recent scientific developments in detail the greenhouse effect, acid rain, the depletion of the ozone layer and the effects of ultraviolet radiation, the emission of CFCs, and nuclear power He demonstrates the geophysical interaction of atmosphere, oceans, climate, and the Earth s crust, regulated comfortably for life by living organisms using the energy of the sun.But Gaia is not always the benign life force many people have taken her to be Gaia theory forces a planetary perspective It is the health of the planet that matters, not that of some individual species of organisms This is where Gaia and the environmental movements, which are concerned first with the health of people, part company This hypothesis not only raises profound philosophical questions it also challenges both conservationists and the scientific establishment to think again.Cover photograph by Steve Krongard The Image Bank

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      Published :2018-08-20T08:47:36+00:00

    One thought on “The Ages Of Gaia: A Biography Of Our Living Earth”

    1. I read an earlier edition of this book sometime in the mid 1990s.A logical, illuminating and sometimes surprising look at how Earth and life on it evolved to what it is today and how it (probably) works as a biosphere.Gaia knows how to preserve life on Earth, but that's not the same thing as preserving the human race on Earth.James Lovelock's analyses of life on Earth was born out of his mission to try and detect life on Mars n the 1960s. While others were building cages to trap insects (I know, [...]

    2. I found this book to be a very mixed bag for me. In places funny, in others extremely dry and confusing. Some chapters flow beautifully, while others one has to drag oneself through. Overall, I guess one could think of planet earth as the entity he describes, and if looking at the our planet in this way would help some people to act, vote, talk, behave differently, I am all for it. But otherwise, what's the point?I also wonder about the sources he used, the scientists whose work he references. S [...]

    3. The second of Lovelock's books that I've read, this one was much more technical and more difficult to read than his other, The Vanishing Face of Gaia. I chose to read this one because of the mention of Daisyworld in Vanishing Face, a statistical model of a world inhabited by a combination of white and black daisies that work to control the overall temperature and climate of their planet by their numbers, effecting the albedo of the planet. Daisyworld is mentioned in passing in Vanishing Face; in [...]

    4. The classic work by James Lovelock introduces us to the Gaia hypothesis that our planet earth is a coherent system of life, self-regulating and shifting, an almost independent living organism.

    5. My daughter had this as a secondary reading source for an environmental science class. But for the most part, there is no environmentalist agenda in the book, and the lack of footnotes makes even the science suspect.I agree with many of the previous reviews of this classic book. It is very hard to read for most of the book. Some sections flow for the common reader, but the limited reference list makes it unsuitable as a rigidly scientific text. This edition is an update from the original text. M [...]

    6. This is a good reference for who wants to research an interesting theory about the life of the planet and to learn Her history and the differents way whose makes possible the life.

    7. Having read Lovelock's "Gaia, a New Look at Life on Earth" a few years prior, I read this and while I also enjoyed it, my recollection is that it didn't add as much to the first book as I was hoping.

    8. It took me many months to finally finish The Ages of Gaia. I suppose it's because a lot of it was dry in the way scientific writing is dry to people who are not scientists but wish they could understand what scientists say. Daisyworld, for example, is an interesting supposition and thought experiment on how planetary phenomena influence and are influenced by life on a smaller scale --- an idea that today seems typically banal but was novel at the time it was brought forward. I understand it intu [...]

    9. Initially Lovelock recounts the story of how he came up with the Gaia principle. He is in his fifties and working on instruments that will study the environments of Venus and Mars. His attention is turned toward the Earth and its ability to promote biological life as we know it. Cyanobacteria were the first producers to use sunlight and replicate themselves. Are we recreating the conditions under which they thrived initially in the shallow waters of Lake Champlain? He talks about the successful [...]

    10. I was introduced to Lovelock's Gaia theory many years ago, and although I went on to thinking about many other theories of life on earth, I never forgot Gaia. So, when doing research for writing my next novel, I went back to studying further the writings of James Lovelock's many books. Beginning with The Ages of Gaia: A Biography of our Living Earth, I felt that this would be the place to begin. I was not disappointed. Lovelock tells us what is known and what is not known, and why we need not co [...]

    11. James Lovelock’s The Ages of Gaia, a Biography of the Living Earth, fleshes out his idea that all of life on Earth—including the rocks--is in fact one living self-regulating organism.Is this even possible? To illustrate how it might work, Lovelock postulates a simple model of light and dark colored daisies, called Daisyworld, where populations of daisies increase and decrease according to how much sunlight the planet receives. His argument moves back to the Archean age approximately 3.6 bill [...]

    12. This is the second book written by Lovelock and the Gaia hypothesis and I enjoyed them both. Even after reading two books on the topic I still have trouble explaining to others just what it is. I do believe that the idea of a living Earth is a extremely beneficial of observing the planet and to me that is what this idea is all about. The books starts with a lot of rather in depth questioning and speculating on how life has effected the Earth, particularity it's atmosphere over geologic time. It [...]

    13. This book was okay. It got me interested in the beginnings of life on earth, and now I have a whole stack of books about that next to my bed, so that is good. Lovelock is a bit of a nut, though. I'm not a scientist so the Gaia idea doesn't threaten some deep need to keep my discipline separate from some other discipline. It's ironic that environmentalists are into his Gaia trip, when he's all into nuclear power and keeps referring to CFCs as harmless. I love the chapter on Mars though. Lately, I [...]

    14. Fairly complex in its scientific jargon but very illuminating if you like revolutionary ideas. Most scientists will dismiss you immediately when you bring up Gaia but the ideas are just as well based on evidence as the foundations of geology, climatology, or physics. This brings all of those together and that is what needs to happen. To much science is carried out in isolated disciplines which don't know what eacho ther are talking about. Great read but surprisingly difficult.

    15. I viewed the 'save the planet' bandwagon differently since reading this. The planet will protect itself, it is mankind that will disappear if it continues to use up all that is needed for its survival. But Daisyworld itself will self heal and continue long after our species have self destructed. I will file this under 'science' but it does raise many philosophical questions too.

    16. Lovelock tries to make a stronger case for the Earth as a living system (Gaia Hypothesis) with the use of the, e.g computer'Daisy' model. Also includes an interesting chapter near the end of the book on how one might seed or tera-form Mars.

    17. This was an amazing eye opener. You'll read this, and you'll either think the guy is an absolute nut, or you'll be amazed and never look at the earth the same again.

    18. The book was a very good introduction to GAIA and how it has changed over the eons. Lots of food for thought sprinkled throughout the book along with a good dose of science.

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