Cigarette Lighter Object Lessons is a series of short beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things Smokers survivalists teenagers collectors The cigarette lighter is a charged complex yet

  • Title: Cigarette Lighter
  • Author: Jack Pendarvis
  • ISBN: 9781501307362
  • Page: 191
  • Format: Paperback
  • Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things.Smokers, survivalists, teenagers, collectors The cigarette lighter is a charged, complex, yet often entirely disposable object that moves across these various groups of people, acquiring and emitting different meanings while always supplying its primary function, thaObject Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things.Smokers, survivalists, teenagers, collectors The cigarette lighter is a charged, complex, yet often entirely disposable object that moves across these various groups of people, acquiring and emitting different meanings while always supplying its primary function, that of ignition While the lighter may seem at first a niche object only for old fashioned cigarette smokers in this book Jack Pendarvis explodes the lighter as something with deep history, as something with quirky episodes in cultural contexts, and as something that dances with wide ranging taboos and traditions Pendarvis shows how the lighter tarries with the cheapest ends of consumer culture as much as it displays profound dramas of human survival, technological advances, and aesthetics.Object Lessons is published in partnership with an essay series in the The Atlantic.

    • [PDF] Download ☆ Cigarette Lighter | by ↠ Jack Pendarvis
      191 Jack Pendarvis
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ Cigarette Lighter | by ↠ Jack Pendarvis
      Posted by:Jack Pendarvis
      Published :2019-01-07T06:47:18+00:00

    One thought on “Cigarette Lighter”

    1. "I had known him less than half an hour when Ted Ballard showed me a tobacco pouch made from a human scrotum." First line from the only book about cigarette lighters you'll ever need. Not only a meditation on the power and impermanence of objects but a brilliant and hilarious cultural tour of lighters in film and beyond. Not just for lighter aficionados. Film buffs will especially appreciate what Pendarvis has done here. I love this book so damn much.

    2. I love thematic histories as a rule. This one, not so much. Maybe it was the proverbial exception to the rule. Maybe there just isn't that much to say about cigarette lighters. It's a small book, especially considering that the last quarter of it is taken up by the bibliography, etc. There are some interesting historical facts, but primarily it's a list of memorable mentions of matches and lighters on pages and on film. And it sort of reads like a list as well, which is obviously far from optima [...]

    3. Impressionistic social history of cigarette lighters, from guns repurposed as lighters, the classy aura of gold Dunhills, the military souvenir value of Zippos, gestures of cigarette lighting in books and movies (and the intimacy implied by eschewing a lighter and going cigarette to cigarette) to the decline of American lighters in tandem with smoking decreasing.

    4. (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.)Object Lessons is a series of short, beautifully designed books about the hidden lives of ordinary things. Smokers, survivalists, teenagers, collectors…. The cigarette lighter is a charged, complex, yet often entirely disposable object that moves across these various groups of people, acquiring and emitting different meanings while always supplying its primary function, that of ignition. While the lighter ma [...]

    5. This book is full of gems: “Your cigarette lighter represents your soul, so you get drunk and give it away to your pal, or your pal steals it without compunction. Either way, you can’t hang onto it forever.”(From Urban Dictionary): "The real history to the white lighter myth and why they are unlucky is based on four famous and revolutionary musicians of the second half of the 20th century. Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Kurt Cobain were all left-handed, all died at the age o [...]

    6. Who’d have thought the simple cigarette lighter would have had such an interesting and significant history. One of Bloomsbury’s series called Object Lessons – each one an examination of an ordinary object –the author of this one finds a museum dedicated to lighters, and uses this as a starting point to embark on a rambling (and admittedly sometimes repetitive) riff on lighters in all their manifestations, especially in film. Certainly I will now always be on the lookout for them when I w [...]

    7. A jumpy, scattershot look at the cigarette lighter as a cultural icon - there's a lot of "Look at this! And what about that!" in the organization of the piece that takes some getting used to. I think I would have appreciated a deeper dive into one of the topics Mr. Pendarvis touches upon (say, lighters in Humphrey Bogart movies), but there's enough here to spark a reader's interest in pursuing a subject matter on his or her own. I received an ecopy from the publishers and NetGalley in exchange f [...]

    8. One time I found a lighter on a bench at House of Blues. Later someone asked if I had a light. I gave them the lighter. This has happened a few times in my life and maybe yours!Want stories like that? But better because I'm not a writer and that's as interesting as my story is. Well them read this, lots of fact on lighters, including my favorite: where to find lighters in movies. Fun, quick read. Interested to look into the other stories in this series one day.

    9. This is just a gem of a book, with Jack Pendarvis's utterly distinctive, utterly like no other voice: ridiculously funny, richly complicated, buoyant and full of mystery and joy.

    10. Much of this book was woven through pop culture references that I wasn't remotely aware of, and if I were, I would have enjoyed it even more. Millennials, shrug! :)

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