Kasztner s Train The True Story of Rezso Kaztner Unknown Hero of the Holocaust A tale of rescue as remarkable as Wallenberg or Schindler An important piece of forgotten history Kati Marton author of The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World The heroic sto

  • Title: Kasztner's Train: The True Story of Rezso Kaztner, Unknown Hero of the Holocaust
  • Author: Anna Porter
  • ISBN: 9781553652229
  • Page: 167
  • Format: None
  • A tale of rescue as remarkable as Wallenberg or Schindler An important piece of forgotten history Kati Marton, author of The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World The heroic story of Rezs Kasztner, the Hungarian Oskar Schindler who saved thousands of Hungarian Jews from certain death at the hands of the Nazis, only to be accused of collaborati A tale of rescue as remarkable as Wallenberg or Schindler An important piece of forgotten history Kati Marton, author of The Great Escape Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World The heroic story of Rezs Kasztner, the Hungarian Oskar Schindler who saved thousands of Hungarian Jews from certain death at the hands of the Nazis, only to be accused of collaboration and assassinated in I srael twelve years after World War II ended Based on interviews with those who were on the train as well as documents and correspondence not previously published, Anna Porter tells the dramatic, full story of one of the heroes of the twentieth century.

    Kastner train Kasztner s Train The True Story of Rezso Kasztner Kasztner s Train is an extremely hard book to read but the trouble lies in the harrowing contents Nevertheless, it s crucial to read it and remind ourselves of the limitlessness of human brutality. Rezs Kasztner Kasztner s Train, Mar Video C SPAN Anna Porter talked about her book Kasztner s Train The True Story of an Unknown Hero of the Holocaust.The book tells the story of Rezso Kasztner who arranged for a train to transport , Jews Kasztner s Train The True Story of Rezso Kaztner, Unknown Kasztner s Train by Anna Porter is a book that I would recommend to anyone wanting to learn on this subject Personally, I do not recall ever before being challenged by Kasztner s Train Passengers List Flickr The list of passengers of Kasztner s Trains, created in August in Bergen Belsen concentration camp , For information, check the Israel Kasztner website at The Rudolph Kasztner Transports jewishgen Lanzmann questions Hansi Brand about the highly controversial rescue mission, the Kasztner Train Lanzmann does not use this term , especially about the privileged nature of the transport and the passengers from Cluj, Kasztner s home town. Kasztner s Train The True Story of an Unknown Hero of the Kasztner s Train a reference to the famous train ride to freedom he organized tells this dramatic story for the first time, including a shocking postscript After the war, Kasztner emigrated to Israel, where in he was stunningly convicted of collaborating with the Nazis than a decade before. Kasztner s Train ebook by Anna Porter Rakuten Kobo Kasztner s Train explores the nature of Kasztner the cool hero, the proud Zionist, the man who believed that promises, even to the Nazis, had to be kept The deals he made raise questions about moral choices that continue to haunt the world today. The Kasztner Transports geni family tree Kasztner s negotiations also saved , Hungarian Jews by diverting them to an Austrian labor camp, Strasshof, instead of a planned transfer to extermination camps Kasztner himself didn t board his famous train to freedom, instead staying behind and negotiating the further release of Jews, risking his own life.

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    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ Kasztner's Train: The True Story of Rezso Kaztner, Unknown Hero of the Holocaust | by ☆ Anna Porter
      Posted by:Anna Porter
      Published :2018-07-17T11:17:30+00:00

    One thought on “Kasztner's Train: The True Story of Rezso Kaztner, Unknown Hero of the Holocaust”

    1. Oh my, there are too many details. Rather than clarifying, they confuse. I actually want to quit this. How much more can I take? I have read 111 of 466. It is a very bad sign when you start looking at page numbers.Nope, I am giving this up. I picked up Armenian Golgotha just to check out a bit about the author who survived the Armenian Genocide in Turkey, 1915. This is also a book of non-fiction. Now this I cannot put down. Non-fiction does not have to be dry and confusing as I found "Kasztner's [...]

    2. Never having read Perfidy (I know, shame on me), I first learned about Kasztner when I read The Seventh Million: The Israelis and the Holocaust. My curiosity was aroused. What was up with this guy? Was he a hero? A villain? So when I noticed this book in a secondhand bookstore, I couldn't resist. Given its length, I was hoping it would shed some light on this complicated story.Unfortunately, the amount of detail detracted and muddied the picture for me rather than clarifying things. The book giv [...]

    3. The man and his story are quite remarkable, and it's good to see the vindication this book attempts to give him. The fault of this book is entirely the author's. She can't seem to get a grasp on what kind of book she is trying to write. A good portion of the book is a very dry, fact, fact, fact reiteration of what happened. Then, every so often, an awkward page or paragraph appears which reads like a novelization of events. The rest of the pages are filled with off-topic stories of atrocity whic [...]

    4. If you have an interest in learning about the Holocaust and those that did try to do something about it, this book will keep your interest from beginning to end. Even though the subject material is terribly sad, I loved this book.

    5. I had not heard of Reszo Kasztner prior to buying this book. Porter touts him on the cover as a hero and on the jacket as another Oskar Schindler, and tells his story straightforwardly in a manner devoid of nuance. And this story requires nuance as well as reflection. Kasztner was a Hungarian Jew who worked to save over a thousand Jews in Budapest and other areas of Nazi-occupied Hungary, and in the process worked closely with SS officers like Kurt Becher to the point where he went to nightclubs [...]

    6. Anything related to the Holocaust is terribly sad. This poor man, a Hungarian Jew, who always knew that once the Germans invaded other parts of the country, they would do the same to them. However,most Jews there refused to believe it. Once all the atrocities started, he & a handful of people started trying to intervene with the Germans to save as many people as they could. Amazing all the ways, all the trickery (on both parts-Jews & Germans) to "haggle" for lives. He got 2 trains to go [...]

    7. A fascinating look at Hungary after the Germans invaded in 1944. A lot of it will be familiar if you've read The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer. Unfortunately, Porter tried to include too many details, especially during the first part, into the book. It got very tedious and detracted from the main story. Hungary's Jews were spared for several years until the Nazis got word that Horthy was investigating an ending of hostilities with the Allies. Germany also knew the end was close for them and [...]

    8. This book was incredibly interesting and presented the holocaust from an entirely different point of view. It was very interesting to me to read about Budapest during the Nazi occupation because we have visited there twice. The book is a little text-booky and hard to get into, but is one of those books that I truly loved by the time that i finished it.

    9. More than I ever knew about Hungarian Jews during World War II. This is the story of one man's efforts to save the Jews of Hungary. Very disturbing, enlightening, sad & informative at the same time. I had a hard time putting it down.

    10. The book is indeed the story of Rezso Kasztner's largely frustrated efforts to save Hungarian Jews from Nazi death camps but it is also much more. Some reviewers have complained about the wealth of detail. Some sections could have been shortened. There could have been descriptive reminders attached to names that are mentioned and then suddenly reappear 40 or 100 pages later.But the granular depth of the story describes the overall environment of the catastrophe. What looked like a massive and hi [...]

    11. Sadly, I must confess that, although I have read many books on World War II and on the Holocaust, until now I have not read anything on how Hungary as a nation allied to Germany and the Jewish people in particular were affected by these events. "Kasztner's Train" by Anna Porter is a book that I would recommend to anyone wanting to learn more on this subject. Personally, I do not recall ever before being challenged by book as much as I was by this one. The writer does not apologise for the honest [...]

    12. Since I had never heard of Rezso Kasztner and his role in the Holocaust, I bought a copy of "Kasztner's Train." I struggled through the first half of the book as it was overloaded with details and characters. After several months I picked up the book again and didn't dwell on trying to keep everything straight in my mind.My husband's parents immigrated from Hungary prior to WWII. Thus, I found the content to be very interesting. And even though I have read a lot about the Holocaust, I still lear [...]

    13. The way this book was written wasn't very good; it was difficult to follow the who/what/when of the narrative, so I felt sort of lost throughout the reading, except when we finally got closer to the end of the war and thus to the end of the story. I was shocked by the treatment of the Holocaust survivors by their fellow Jews when the war ended and many of them (survivors) moved to Israel. Rezso Kasztner's treatment was also deplorable.Despite the not-great story-telling, this book is still worth [...]

    14. I saw a write up about this book in the Vancouver Sun by Malcolm Perry. It's the story of 1,684 Hungarian Jews that escaped the Nazi Holocaust in 1944. The escape was negotiated by Rezso Kasztner with Adolf Eichmann. I think this book may have been made into a movie. The author Anna Porter, left Hungary in 1956 and became Key Porter's publisher in 1969.

    15. 'Conflicted' is the one word I can say I feel about the Kasztner question. As for the way it was written I feel Porter was very biased (in favor of Kasztner) throughout the book. It makes you feel obliged to read other accounts to form a full picture. I'm still processing my thoughts on it all.

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