War of the Foxes In this long awaited follow up to Crush Yale Series of Younger Poets prize winner Richard Siken turns toward the problems of making and representation in an unrelenting interrogation of our world of

  • Title: War of the Foxes
  • Author: Richard Siken
  • ISBN: 9781556594779
  • Page: 379
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this long awaited follow up to Crush, Yale Series of Younger Poets prize winner Richard Siken turns toward the problems of making and representation, in an unrelenting interrogation of our world of doublings In this restless, swerving book simple questions such as, Why paint a bird are immediately complicated by concerns of morality, human capacity, and the ways we loIn this long awaited follow up to Crush, Yale Series of Younger Poets prize winner Richard Siken turns toward the problems of making and representation, in an unrelenting interrogation of our world of doublings In this restless, swerving book simple questions such as, Why paint a bird are immediately complicated by concerns of morality, human capacity, and the ways we look to art for meaning and purpose while participating in its and our own invention.

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      Published :2018-08-27T17:15:46+00:00

    One thought on “War of the Foxes”

    1. This rating is probably slightly higher than it should be if I were being honest with myself, but Richard Siken's first book, Crush, is one of the best things I've ever read by anybody and very important to me, so I can't fathom taking away more than one star from him.At any rate, I was obviously eagerly anticipating this, and I have to admit it didn't quite live up to my (admittedly lofty) expectations. Let me be clear about one thing: it's really not anything at all like Crush, except that Sik [...]

    2. While this collection started off on a fairly strong note, it began fragmenting early on, disintegrating into a repetitive series of empty words and images. This is the exact type of self-referential, intentionally clever poetic trap that I so heartily praised Crush for resisting. It's particularly disappointing because Siken's first collection was so exceptional. These poems feel as though they were written by an entirely different person; I had to flip to the back cover several times to double [...]

    3. god, god, god, why did i read this with my pdf of crush open? but, no, really - they really do belong together. crush we all loved because it was rife with longing and reeking of desperation, because all of his poems went back to the same thread of wanting. war of the foxes is that slightly lonely aftermath, especially in the beginning, and because it's not circling the same yearning that crush had, its poems are more - i don't want to say scatterbrained, because they're not, but the poems cover [...]

    4. While this isn't Crush (and it is unfair to even try and compare them), this still a swoon worthy collection of poems. There are feelings that Siken knows how to put on words that are mind-blowing. Have you ever felt like your heart is thundering in your ribcage while you read something?Well, that's how reading Siken always feels like.

    5. Hook and bait,polestar and checkmate, I am your arrival,there is norefusal, we are here, you see, together, we are already here.I don't like to review poetry, so I'll just talk a little bit about this one.Richard Siken is my favorite poet. His first collection,Crush, was the first poetry book I felt truly able to connect with. There's something about the way he describes his passions and his losses, so raw and beautifully, that made me feel almost transcendent. So it was hard for me to rate this [...]

    6. 'War of the Foxes' hasn't left me me as heartbroken as 'Crush' did but it still made quiet an impression. I think the poems in this one are more thought-out but at the same time more wild, almost violent. I'm sure I'll read this collection many times in the near future and then I'll be able to talk about my favourites. For now, I cannot stop thinking about 'Detail of the Woods' and 'Self-portrait Against Red Wallpaper'. I'm glad we got new material from Siken. He paints with his words like no on [...]

    7. Saying something should be enough. It isn't. It should be.Things to point out: this isn't ''Crush''. It didn't have to be. This is something different. Things to point out: this is a book about violence. I've read many lists of what this book is about. Meaning, creation, existence, eternal questioning, birds. I felt it as a book of violence. I felt it like one feels two boots walking over a tired chest, if one is to feel this ever in one's life. Things to point out: -how am I to know where to fi [...]

    8. Just fucking brilliant. Every single line, every single page. Siken surpasses Crush by a milestone. Crush was a lot about loss, love, death, and heartbreak. In War of The Foxes, Siken goes beyond those major themes in life to talk about the matter/meaning of existence itself through the metaphors of landscapes, birds, and paint. He made me feel things that I can't explain. I threw this book down multiple times while reading. I cried somewhere in the middle and my heart screamed for purpose.

    9. I wanted to explainmyself to myself in an understandable way.I gaveshape to my fears and made excuses. I varied myvelocities, watched myselves sleep. Something’s notright about what I’m doing but I’m still doing it—living in the worst parts, ruining myself. *Sometimes the man felt likethe bird and sometimes the man felt like a stone—solid,inevitable—but mostly he felt like a bird, or that there wasa bird inside him, or that something inside him was like abird fluttering.

    10. This collection is very different; gone is the distinctive urgency, forwardness, and passion of Crush. War of the Foxes is, instead, an allegory painted in soft strokes and muted colours, more of a reflection of the self and the world surrounding it than a story told in screaming colours, blood, and bruises. However, it's still very much a good collection, and it's interesting to see Siken doing a different take on poetry than what he did in Crush: comparisons will, of course, still be drawn, be [...]

    11. Anyone can paint a mask. It's boring. And everyone secretly wants to collaborate with the enemy, to construct a truer version of the self. How much can you change and get away with it, before you turn into someone else, before it's some kind of murder? Difficult, to be confronted with the fact of yourself. ETA Nov 2017:I don't have the words I'd need to explain how striking both Crush and War of the Foxes are to me, albeit in hugely different ways. They can hardly be compared to each other, they [...]

    12. No, this is not a repeat of Crush. Yes, it's the same Siken. No, it's not the weaker collection. It's not as loud as Crush, not as raw or in your face, so you have to dig deeper. It's layers upon layers that you have to unpeel for yourself. You can’t paint the inside of anything, so why would you try?

    13. this book changed my life 10/10 i want to go to richard sikens house and pet his cat while we both cry we both live in arizona so like i could do that feasibly some time before april 23

    14. it's a 2.5, folks. poor richard. the internet has ruined free verse for me, and from now on i will only be reading poetry in formally structured forms. next time a student asks me, 'but poems have to rhyme, right?' instead of saying no, i will shout, 'YES, ALWAYS, AND THEY HAVE TO BE METERED TOO,' and then i will rocket up into the skyere is beauty in here, but it was a chore to sift through to catch it in glimpses.

    15. Honestly a disappointing follow up to the gut-shot emotionalism that made “Crush” so important to me. Although thereweresome great lines, there was not a single poem that blew me away. Please excuse me while I go reread “Litany In Which Certain Things Are Crossed Out” to remind myself of what Siken is really capable of…

    16. I think it's funny other reviewers found Siken's self-conscious approach in War of the Foxes appealing. I just have to say i'm not a fan of self-conscious work, whether it's poetry, fiction, or nonfiction.This collection is overwrought, repetitive, and lacks real progression. It reads too much like a project that was stuck swooning in its frustration, discontent, and grief. I could appreciate the pieces on their own, I think Siken paid much attention to technique and language. However, I am not [...]

    17. re-read: 04/25/2016 - the first time i read this was right after a re-read of crush (which is probs my fav collection of poetry) so when i read this straight after, i was kind of let down i guess????? i still gave it five stars bc it was beautiful, but i wasn't so !!!!! like with crush. now in my first re-read, i appreciated it a whole lot more and yea crush probably will always be higher on my favs, but this just skyrocketed on the list tbhfirst readthrough: 12/02/2016 - i'd been waiting so lon [...]

    18. This was disappointing. It was completely boring- all about math and painting. I'm sure it was metaphors and I'm just too whatever to understand it, but Siken's Crush made me feel like someone was stepping on my chest! War of the Foxes made me feel nothing. Not a thing. It was 47 pages of boring that I made myself read.

    19. I think this book for me is what Crush is to those who adore Siken. It's just something about the language used here, and how magical I found it that made this a special reading experience.

    20. What more can I say? Siken is a major influence of mine. This book has effectively ended my poetry writing slump. I think there's something to be said about how, if you're stuck and you feel like you keep writing bad things after bad things, you should read more. You should read more of what interests you. You should read more of things that inspired you, that you are passionate about. I've been long intrigued by Richard Siken. I saw excerpts and full versions of his poems everywhere on Tumblr, [...]

    21. "Can we lovenature for what itreally is: predatory?"favorite poems:- landscape with fruit rot and millipede- landscape with several small fires- war of the foxes- portrait of fryderyk in shifting light- the museum- detail of the woods- the story of the moon

    22. I liked this a lot, just not as much as crush. There were some beautiful poems along the way though.

    23. I read this all at once, and liked it much more toward the end than the beginning. Perhaps this is acclimation. Another word for it might be Stockholm Syndrome. There's a certain -- coldness is not the word, nor is flatness, but "jackhammering simplicity," I don't know if that makes sense -- in this work that reminds me maybe of Louise Gluck. There's a desire to turn the truth over and over again in one's lines that reminds me of Anne Carson. But these don't pull together as well for me.Maybe th [...]

    24. Перша збірка Ричарда Сайкена, "Crush", яка у 2004 році отримала премію-для-молодих-поетів Єйльського університету, була фантастично популярна як для віршів (наприклад, у неї під 9 тисяч рейтингів на ґудрідс - це й для прози незла цифра, а для поезії взагалі нереальна). Що на неї пра [...]

    25. Brilliant, truly. Hard to swallow at times, with some parts that went straight over my head, but that just makes it more impressive as the poems have layers that forced me to read them over and over so I could grasp even a little bit of meaning. By no means should this book be read as a sequel to the inimitable Crush - (a five star book for me) - as Siken has grown into somebody new as a poet and storyteller and has done an amazing job again. But he is different.If any of you are wondering wheth [...]

    26. Siken's second collection is a book obsessed with the question of why we create and the limits of that which we do - it's full of rhetorical questions on the subject, and almost every poem is steeped in the anxiety of representational inadequacies. I love Siken's poetry - Crush is one of my all-time favourite collections - but the raw emotion in Crush felt lacking in this collection. We create because we have something to say - but all this collection really offered me was creation on the subjec [...]

    27. not as strong, in my opinion, as crush but I ascribe that to my own personal preferences re: poetry, because War of the Foxes was written with a very different tone and style. Just as crush had the running metaphor of a car crash to create contextual threads of atmosphere amongst the poems which otherwise were not written in the same persona or about the same specific narrative, war of the foxes uses painting (as a verb, as a noun and painting in the abstract) as that metaphor. i heard richard t [...]

    28. If you are looking for lyrical romance, this poetry collection is not for you. But if you are looking for the songs that sing just under the surface, the questions that linger around every act and intention, the forces that guide the hand of creation, the vivid images that remain both unspoken and unseen, the myths and allegories that haunt dreaming--wow. Just wow is all I can say.TURPENTINEIt is too heavy, says the canvas. You lack restraint.I was sleeping in whiteness, drifts of snow,and you w [...]

    29. This book seems very copper canyon to me. Notes of Hicok. Lots of declarative sentences. very heavy recurrence of images: painting, birds, Moon. Some of my favorite lines are:I cut off my head and threw it in the sky.Can we love nature for what it really is: predatory?The man thought to himself, one of these birds is not my bird.If one has no apples, one has zero apples.You cannot have an opponent if you keep saying yes.God says, which one of you fuckers can get to me first?A hole in the sky and [...]

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