Crested Kimono Power and Love in the Japanese Business Family Discusses the complex economic emotional biological cultural religious ties relations among family members of Japanese family owned businesses Details the everyday lives of three such families Ham

  • Title: Crested Kimono: Power and Love in the Japanese Business Family
  • Author: Matthews Masayuki Hamabata
  • ISBN: 9780801499753
  • Page: 433
  • Format: Paperback
  • Discusses the complex economic, emotional, biological, cultural, religious ties relations among family members of Japanese family owned businesses Details the everyday lives of three such families Hamabata also describes his own unexpected search for personal discovery acceptance as an unmarried, third generation Japanese American male attempting to fitDiscusses the complex economic, emotional, biological, cultural, religious ties relations among family members of Japanese family owned businesses Details the everyday lives of three such families Hamabata also describes his own unexpected search for personal discovery acceptance as an unmarried, third generation Japanese American male attempting to fit in to tradition bound Japanese society He portrays Japanese society as a balance between tradition modernity, culture person, authority emotion Includes an extensive bibliography.

    • Best Download [Matthews Masayuki Hamabata] ✓ Crested Kimono: Power and Love in the Japanese Business Family || [Mystery Book] PDF ¾
      433 Matthews Masayuki Hamabata
    • thumbnail Title: Best Download [Matthews Masayuki Hamabata] ✓ Crested Kimono: Power and Love in the Japanese Business Family || [Mystery Book] PDF ¾
      Posted by:Matthews Masayuki Hamabata
      Published :2018-08-21T08:13:11+00:00

    One thought on “Crested Kimono: Power and Love in the Japanese Business Family”

    1. All in the FamilyAn interesting study of family patterns and strategies among Japanese business families, Hamabata's book alternates between two poles. On one hand you have extremely complex descriptions of family authority structures and how families develop combined with a lot of Japanese terminology. He takes the theories of a number of writers and tests them out in practice. On the other hand, there is a lot of very interesting descriptive material which not only elucidates the more complex [...]

    2. The alienness of Japanese culture is often remarked upon, in a low-brow sort of way, but what made this book especially appealing to me is that it brings in another group whose alienness, while not as often discussed, is just as significant: the rich.Hamabata, a second-or-third-generation Japanese-American, visited Japan in the late 70s and embedded himself into three or four of the richest, most influential and high-born families of Japan. The families, the Itoos, the Moruichis, the Okimotos (" [...]

    3. A confessional, sui generis work of cultural anthropology in which the "fieldwork" consists of "villages" of wealthy family businesses (douzoku gaisha) in Tokyo. The author goes well beyond the honne/tatemae divide to reveal a treasure trove of detailed information about Japanese business & cultural practices (many of which were new to me, but also including some rare gems that I've discovered in my travels to Japan, but had never seen mentioned in print before).

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