Churchill and Empire A Portrait of an Imperialist One of our finest narrative historians Lawrence James has written a genuinely new biography of Winston Churchill one focusing solely on his relationship with the British Empire As a young army offic

  • Title: Churchill and Empire: A Portrait of an Imperialist
  • Author: Lawrence James
  • ISBN: 9781605985695
  • Page: 211
  • Format: Hardcover
  • One of our finest narrative historians, Lawrence James has written a genuinely new biography of Winston Churchill, one focusing solely on his relationship with the British Empire As a young army officer in the late nineteenth century serving in conflicts in India, South Africa, and the Sudan, his attitude toward the Empire was the Victorian paternalistic approach at onceOne of our finest narrative historians, Lawrence James has written a genuinely new biography of Winston Churchill, one focusing solely on his relationship with the British Empire As a young army officer in the late nineteenth century serving in conflicts in India, South Africa, and the Sudan, his attitude toward the Empire was the Victorian paternalistic approach at once responsible and superior.Conscious even then of his political career ahead, Churchill found himself reluctantly supporting British atrocities and held what many would regard today as prejudiced views, in that he felt that some nationalities were superior to others, his some might say obsequious relationship with America reflected that view America was a former colony where the natives had become worthy to rule themselves, but he felt still had that tie to Britain Thus he overlooked the frequently expressed American view that the Empire was a hangover from a bygone era of colonisation, and reflected poorly on Britain s ability to conduct herself as a political power in the current world order This outmoded attitude was one of the reasons the British voters rejected him after a Second World War in which he had led the country brilliantly His attitude remained decidedly old fashioned in a world that was shaping up very differently However, it would be a mistake to consider Churchill merely as an anachronistic soldier He grasped the problems of the Cold War immediately, believing that immature nations prematurely given independence would be likely to be sucked into the vortex of Communism This view chimed with American foreign policy, and made the Americans rather pragmatic about their demands for self governance for Empire countries This ground breaking volume reveals the many facets of Churchill s personality a visionary leader with a truly Victorian attitude toward the British Empire.

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    One thought on “Churchill and Empire: A Portrait of an Imperialist”

    1. In the year of our lord 2013 (when this book was first published) Lawrence James really went about writing racial slurs outside of quotations, and reminiscing, with a tear in his eye, over what he so obviously saw as benevolent imperialism. Wow.

    2. Too much of a secular hagiography (though, in some ways, it is more of a kind of history of the times of Churchill than a straightforward biography) and too little critique of imperialism for what I expected in a contemporary book with a title like it has, "Churchill and Empire: A Portrait of an Imperialist". It is, actually, a kind of apology for Churchill as an imperialist more than anything else, though however fervid James may be as an imperialist himself, he seems to have to tone it down fo [...]

    3. The premise of this book was Churchill's motivation throughout his life was to maintain the British Empire. With that concept, a lot of what Churchill did makes sense.The book is a good read on the life and times of Churchill, but seemed at times to be discussing world events and did not have enough direct quotes from the man himself. There also seemed to me to be a bit of pro-Churchill, pro-Empire in the author and a few statements that did not have any evidence behind them. The author showed n [...]

    4. Excellent book. Nothing wrong with reviewing a Great Man's thinking and actions against both norms in his times vs. contemporary hindsight.

    5. In depth review of the politics of WWI, WWII and the periods after each war. Helped me to understand current world politics even better.

    6. This was a give away book. It was fascinating, informative and well written. It was interesting reading a different take on events during Churchill's time. Thank you very much!

    7. I found this biography unfortunately a little bit boring. Trying to hang up the whole book on Churchill’s link to the Empire is a bit tenuous and it shows.

    8. Although generally readable and lucid, I don’t quite understand why Lawrence James wrote this book. No surprises herein. Maybe I needed more familiarity with the minutiae of British parliamentary foreign policy to fully appreciate CHURCHILL AND EMPIRE. What’s apparent is that Churchill’s attitudes to empire and race marked him as an unregenerate dinosaur. From his service as Liberal under-secretary for the colonies in 1905 to the end of his second term as prime minister in 1955, his racial [...]

    9. The really interesting thing about this book is that the author re-examines the effect of fighting jihadists in the flesh had upon Churchill, and how that informed his largely justified fears of Bolshevism and his largely, if not reliably, unjustified fears about Mohandas Ghandi.The only thing wrong with this book is a re-examination of the author's verities, which are as debatable (he seems to be a fan of both Anthony Eden and Atlee) as the subject's. The book manages to be symapthetic, though [...]

    10. Despite being somewhat uneven and choppy with dates, this volume was helpful to me in understanding the course of the British Empire from the late nineteenth through the twentieth. Certainly Churchill exemplified the Empire and more than any single person saved it from totalitarian domination in the Second World War.The book is somewhat harsh in its treatment of American diplomacy during and after the War - its author is an English historian - and the Suez Crisis, perhaps the greatest split in " [...]

    11. This is as much a history of the world from pre-World War I through the Korean War. It follow's Churchill's personal engagements and provides what appears to be a detached appraisal of his character. At times Churchill seems hopeless self-obsessed and at times courageous and insightful.The book is detailed in the extreme, but mostly to paint a picture of Churchill's process of reasoning and the world in which it played out. There is no way to absorb all of the details and recall them on a quiz, [...]

    12. Winston Churchill, Empire, Freedom and Human Rights? Oxymoron? Gandhi, Dominion or Independence? Why New Zealand, Canada and Australia are different from Egypt and India? How the Jewish and Palestinian conflict was originated from Churchill's alliance with Zionism? "Never separated with the United States" was Churchill's words that are still followed by all his successors. The "Informal Empire" of US. The transfer of power from British Empire to the "informal" Empire of America entangled with th [...]

    13. I only made it 2/3 of the way through this one, but I didn't find it very interesting. Lots of minutiae. Lots of hindsight judgments about actions taken many years ago through reviewed through the lens of today. I strongly recommend the older historical works by Harold Lamb over this. Unfortunately Lamb never wrote a book about Churchill.

    14. This not your typical look Churchill. It takes the world that Churchill grew up in and how that viewpoint, that of the glories and advantages to the world of a strong imperial England, influenced his actions of the rest of his life. While England's colonies moved toward independence, Churchill did his best to keep them in the empire, particularly India. During both world wars he always looked to keep or expand the empire. It is quite an interesting read.

    15. Disclaimer: I received this book for free via First Reads.I found this to be a worthwhile read. a spirited and detailed account of Churchhill's role in the second World War, the Cold War and the end of the British Empire. my only issue with this book is it got a bit muddled with all the details at points.

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