Andra Sub City One years from now A young woman Andra has had a brain graft operation and has been given the brain of a boy who died in Through the boy s mind she comes to realise that her worl

  • Title: Andra
  • Author: Louise Lawrence
  • ISBN: 9780006735809
  • Page: 253
  • Format: Paperback
  • Sub City One 2000 years from now A young woman, Andra, has had a brain graft operation and has been given the brain of a boy who died in 1987.Through the boy s mind, she comes to realise that her world is restrictive The laws are rigid, the rulers suppress individuality Andra turns against such totalitarian authority and inspires the young people of Sub City One to rebSub City One 2000 years from now A young woman, Andra, has had a brain graft operation and has been given the brain of a boy who died in 1987.Through the boy s mind, she comes to realise that her world is restrictive The laws are rigid, the rulers suppress individuality Andra turns against such totalitarian authority and inspires the young people of Sub City One to rebel with her.This is the story of their fight A fight for freedom.

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      Published :2019-01-25T04:24:57+00:00

    One thought on “Andra”

    1. "Andra" was originally published in 1971, and adapted as an 8 part TV series in Australia in 1976. The book was apparently intended as mainstream SF, not YA SF, though I suspect for today's readers its ideal audience would be early teens.The voice of the story is almost naive, and the science shaky, with several side-trips into what might be classed as magic realism. I read the book several times when I was a teen, and remembered it as a bittersweet tale, engrossing without being a book that one [...]

    2. Originally read this as a teen and the ending and the cover stuck with me, as an unusually bleak ending for a YA book of the time (though it was issued when the YA category didn't even exist in publishing and was just shelved in the children's library at my local library). Saw a secondhand copy of this original first edition hardbook a while back - with the abstract painting of Andra with her long hair shown here, totally unlike the paperback cover. Re-read it in one sitting, it is an easy read, [...]

    3. I encountered this book in an Australian library, and haven't seen it since.I remember finding the idea of inheriting a dead person's memory through a graft more than a little implausible. But assuming it is a possible outcome, why didn't the medical and scientific establishment of the time realize the risk, and take it into account, and present the risk to the protagonist in the process of obtaining consent?The growth of a rebellion from the introduction of 'dangerous' ideas (accidentally, in t [...]

    4. This is one of my favourite books of all time. When ever I read it, it makes me question the way things are, and how much individuality really matters.

    5. I read this book as a teenager, at a time when I never reread a book. Somehow this book had a huge impact and I read it over and over again over the next few years until eventually, about twenty years later, I managed to buy my own copy. I still take it out to read every now and again, but I know much of it off by heart now.I think what impressed me most was Andra's rebellion, because I had always been a rebel. Then there was the ruined world, back when we were living through the Cold War. It ma [...]

    6. An example of Cold War Sci-Fi, unusual by having a female main character. (Who loves the Brontes!!) The rest - distant future, underground bunkers, nuclear war killed the surface, two groups still fighting - is typical. Hell of a downer ending - possible influence on the Matrix triology.

    7. This book was my middle school intro to dystopian lit. Looking back, I'm not surprised I loved it female protagonist who charms most around her with her fierce independence and defiant attitude. It certainly has a few plot holes for me now; I can swallow Andra "seeing" the past through donor eyes, but how did the Dr. have a mystical connection with Andra?However, I still love it. There are precious few sci-fi books where the woman protagonist is also the head of the revolution and has no love in [...]

    8. I think I heard part of a radio adaptation of this book many years ago.Andra is a teenage girl who gets a graft of the visual cortex of a boy who died 2000 years earlier to replace damaged brain tissue. Andra lives in a totalitarian underground city on a post apocalyptic Earth. Her ground breaking operation has an unexpected side effects: she can remember what the Earth looked like in 1987, unlike everyone else she has a desire for personal freedom and self expression and she has also lost the f [...]

    9. Not Quite What I Remembered I just re-read this book after 18 years. The storyline still fascinates me, but as one of Lawrences earlier books, there are several technical issues with her writing. The head hopping (point of view changes within a scene) was the most bothersome. Although all her books do that, it seemed especially distracting in this novel. The idea of a girl knowing all the things Andra does simply because of a brain graft of the optical section is fascinating. Can you really sep [...]

    10. I read this as a teenager and it is definatly for that age group. I found it amazing and loved the idea of this rebellious spirit from the past resurfacing. The bit that always stuck in my mind was the hair colour change - how dramatic.I tracked this book down recently, I had to buy it from a dealer. I still enjoyed it but perhaps not as much as an adult. Still its a great read for a teenage girl!

    11. I really liked this book , all through it Andra had spunk and made you like her . My only complaint is it ended very badly for me and I don't like books with bad endings . I do see why the author would go this way though .

    12. I enjoyed this book - but I'm not sure if it's because of sharing the same name or something else. I loved the connection but hated the ending. Felt a little empty. Maybe that was what the author wanted - to leave the reader wanting more.

    13. This is the first Sci-Fi book I read as a child. I absolutely loved it, so different from anything else at the time, I still remember it now over 40 years later. If I am asked what is my favourite book , I always say this one.

    14. It was so strange to read a book with a main character that shares my name. Generally not a fan of sci-fi, but it was a gift and with that title, it was a book I had to read. Very simple plot (anti-climatic), and lacks character development. Finished it in 2 sittings.

    15. I read this when I was 12, borrowed from my local library, and have been looking for a copy for about twenty years, to see if it stands up to my memories

    16. I read this book as a teenager. I was intrigued that no matter what science can do you can not destroy the human soul.

    17. I loved this book as a teenager and I still love it now. A product of its time, the Cold War is ever present.

    18. This doesn't pack quite the emotional punch it did when I was younger, but it's still an interesting look at conformity politics and rebellion.

    19. I really enjoyed this book, the only thing I can fault about it is the abrupt ending that left me feeling a bit let down.

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