Beowulf A Translation Many modern Beowulf translations while excellent in their own ways suffer from what Kathleen Biddick might call melancholy for an oral and aural way of poetic making By and large they tend to prese

  • Title: Beowulf: A Translation
  • Author: Thomas Meyer
  • ISBN: 9780615612652
  • Page: 157
  • Format: Paperback
  • Many modern Beowulf translations, while excellent in their own ways, suffer from what Kathleen Biddick might call melancholy for an oral and aural way of poetic making By and large, they tend to preserve certain familiar features of Anglo Saxon verse as it has been constructed by editors, philologists, and translators the emphasis on caesura and alliteration, with dictMany modern Beowulf translations, while excellent in their own ways, suffer from what Kathleen Biddick might call melancholy for an oral and aural way of poetic making By and large, they tend to preserve certain familiar features of Anglo Saxon verse as it has been constructed by editors, philologists, and translators the emphasis on caesura and alliteration, with diction and syntax smoothed out for readability The problem with, and the paradox of this desired outcome, especially as it concerns Anglo Saxon poetry, is that we are left with a document that translates an entire organizing principle based on oral transmission and perhaps composition into a visual, textual realm of writing and reading The sense of loss or nostalgia for the old form seems a necessary and ever present shadow over modern Beowulfs.What happens, however, when a contemporary poet, quite simply, doesn t bother with any such nostalgia When the entire organizational apparatus of the poem instead of being uneasily approximated in modern verse form is itself translated into a modern organizing principle, i.e the visual text This is the approach that poet Thomas Meyer takes.

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      Posted by:Thomas Meyer
      Published :2018-08-12T10:40:57+00:00

    One thought on “Beowulf: A Translation”

    1. Anyone who sets out to review a translation of Beowulf, should at least be honest about the assumptions underwriting their reaction. So there are basically two orientations: 1) There is only one 'Beowulf' and it is written down in a language called Old English (or Anglo-Saxon) and exists in a sole copy.2) There was a story about a character called Beowulf, and one version of that story was recorded by a scribe in OE. If you believe in #1 then any translation is a doomed failure to ‚Äėreproduce‚ [...]

    2. Let me just start off by saying that this should not be anyone's only Beowulf. Meyer himself says so. But, if you're already familiar with the classic, well, what can I say? The ebook is free and the POD version is worth every penny. I'll also lead off by saying that postmodern poetry has always kind of baffled me, so I'm not qualified to discuss the poetics of this translation in any detail. I just sort of have to go with the flow, knowing the story, having poked at the original language here a [...]

    3. Another struggle. Epic poetry, eh.Again, when I got myself in the right head space, it slotted into place in my head right alongside The Hobbit. It's enough to make me want to learn Old English so I can have that 'alien experience' so often cited.But I wasn't in that space often enough. I'm going to put this into the re-read pile and come back to it when I haven't put pressure on myself to read 50 books in a calendar year.

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