The Ruling Elite of Singapore Networks of Power and Influence Michael Barr explores the complex and covert networks of power at work in one of the world s most prosperous countries the city state of Singapore He argues that the contemporary networks of power are

  • Title: The Ruling Elite of Singapore: Networks of Power and Influence
  • Author: Michael D. Barr
  • ISBN: 9781780762340
  • Page: 403
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Michael Barr explores the complex and covert networks of power at work in one of the world s most prosperous countries the city state of Singapore He argues that the contemporary networks of power are a deliberate project initiated and managed by Lee Kuan Yew former prime minister and Singapore s founding father designed to empower himself and his family Barr ideMichael Barr explores the complex and covert networks of power at work in one of the world s most prosperous countries the city state of Singapore He argues that the contemporary networks of power are a deliberate project initiated and managed by Lee Kuan Yew former prime minister and Singapore s founding father designed to empower himself and his family Barr identifies the crucial institutions of power including the country s sovereign wealth funds, and the government linked companies together with five critical features that form the key to understanding the nature of the networks He provides an assessment of possible shifts of power within the elite in the wake of Lee Kuan Yew s son, Lee Hsien Loong, assuming power, and considers the possibility of a fundamental democratic shift in Singapore s political system.

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      403 Michael D. Barr
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      Posted by:Michael D. Barr
      Published :2018-05-21T01:08:50+00:00

    One thought on “The Ruling Elite of Singapore: Networks of Power and Influence”

    1. Paradigm-shifting book that illuminates the mechanisms through which Singapore operates. It is difficult to piece everything together without this book. I will refrain from talking about things like nepotism, quasi-meritocratic oligarchy, paranoia etc because those terms need adequate treatment which can be found in this book. I was very surprised when I found that multiple copies of this book sits placidly in the recesses of Lv 11 of the NLB.

    2. The Ruling Elite of Singapore is a brilliant publication, in which Michael Barr, a senior lecturer in International Relations at Flinders University, Australia, explores “the complex and covert networks of power” in the city-state of Singapore.The text is divided into eight concise chapters, written in a clear, objective style that is not bloated with academic jargon. The content is juicy without being slanderous, and factual without being pedantic.The book takes an incisive look at the “t [...]

    3. The Ruling Elite reads like a small, statistics-stuffed book on baseball - its short eight chapters list numbers on and relations between Singapore's political players dating since the 1950s. Barr sketches a shadowy outline of an English educated political elite taking deliberate steps to dominate the military, force minority races to conform, and undercut the economic vitality of historically mammoth Chinese businesses through the slow but steady upward-filtering of Singapore's top talent.Barr [...]

    4. A hard book to write well, as so many things are stacked against it. Little of this will be new to those who have lived in Singapore, but gaining access to more of those who might have something more substantial to say is obviously problematic. The Singapore National Archives are closed off as well, so historically much of the data falls back on the old secondary published sources. At times more of an extended feature article reproducing ongoing work by social media. But useful all the same as a [...]

    5. not very well-written at all, and hardly an argument in sight. mostly history and some very badly compiled statistics that insinuate and accuse through speculation rather than evidence. (this is no doubt in part due to the unavailability of data, but that doesn't excuse the inability to form anything resembling an argument, rather than a summary of historical fact.) i'm with it on its premise - which has been demonstrated, if not systematically, elsewhere - but this book doesn't do very well at [...]

    6. Singaporeans should really read this book; Barr articulates so many things that we kind of know, but haven't really seen set in writing. As I read this book I found myself continually highlighting passages for future reference. The power relations in Singaporean politics are clearly traced and described here, and is a must-read for anyone who wants to a glimpse into the climate and psyche of politics here.

    7. Have to say that I'm somewhat sceptical about some of the claims made in this book but nonetheless the perspectives it presents are quite insightful and even compelling.

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