Basho and the Fox The great poet Basho lives in a hut in the woods content to live simply and write his haiku poems One day he shoos a fox out of the cherry tree hear his hut The fox makes a deal with him if Basho ca

  • Title: Basho and the Fox
  • Author: Tim J. Myers
  • ISBN: 9780761450689
  • Page: 368
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The great poet Basho lives in a hut in the woods, content to live simply and write his haiku poems One day he shoos a fox out of the cherry tree hear his hut The fox makes a deal with him, if Basho can write a poem that the fox thinks is good, the fox will leave his cherries alone forever But will his poems ever impress the fox

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      Posted by:Tim J. Myers
      Published :2018-012-10T09:59:03+00:00

    One thought on “Basho and the Fox”

    1. Love it! Well-told with large, detailed illustrations, lovely haiku, and a perfect twist at the end!

    2. We checked this out from the library twice before I tracked down a copy to buy. The illustrations of the poet-foxes in their kimonos are magical and sweet. The text is rich enough for multiple analyses. The poet Basho lives as a hermit in Japan and gets into a dispute with the local foxes about a cherry tree. They challenge him to present one perfect poem in order to win the right to the cherries. Mason sees the moral as seeking inspiration rather than honing your craft in a vacuum. I think it's [...]

    3. A delightful story about a great Japanese poet who gets into a "battle of the haikus" with a fox. The fox assures him that foxes are the best poets around and if Basho can right a good - not even a great - poem, the foxes will let him have all the sweet cherries in the tree. In the end, Basho realizes that poems should be written for their own sake and foxes have a rather inflated opinion of their poetic abilities.Fabulous illustrations.

    4. This is one of my favorite choices to read aloud to a classroom of older students. I was impressed when the third graders I read it to a few weeks ago knew who Basho was and recognized one of his poems! (Apparently from one of the Magic Treehouse books.)

    5. If you write poetry for someone (animal, mineral, vegetable or human) make sure it's familiar. You know, make it relevant. And always share. A delightful book!

    6. This is a fabulous story I read to Frida at the library. I want to go back and check it out so I can reread it.

    7. When the great Japanese poet Basho moves to a new place, the local foxes want to continue eating the cherries of the tree on his property. This leads to a poetry contest--and a surprising ending!

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