How the Canyon Became Grand A Short History Dismissed by the first Spanish explorers as a wasteland the Grand Canyon lay virtually unnoticed for three centuries until nineteenth century America rediscovered it and seized it as a national emble

  • Title: How the Canyon Became Grand: A Short History
  • Author: Stephen J. Pyne
  • ISBN: 9780140280562
  • Page: 209
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dismissed by the first Spanish explorers as a wasteland, the Grand Canyon lay virtually unnoticed for three centuries until nineteenth century America rediscovered it and seized it as a national emblem This extraordinary work of intellectual and environmental history tells two tales of the Canyon the discovery and exploration of the physical Canyon and the invention andDismissed by the first Spanish explorers as a wasteland, the Grand Canyon lay virtually unnoticed for three centuries until nineteenth century America rediscovered it and seized it as a national emblem This extraordinary work of intellectual and environmental history tells two tales of the Canyon the discovery and exploration of the physical Canyon and the invention and evolution of the cultural Canyon how we learned to endow it with mythic significance.Acclaimed historian Stephen Pyne examines the major shifts in Western attitudes toward nature, and recounts the achievements of explorers, geologists, artists, and writers, from John Wesley Powell to Wallace Stegner, and how they transformed the Canyon into a fixture of national identity This groundbreaking book takes us on a completely original journey through the Canyon toward a new understanding of its niche in the American psyche, a journey that mirrors the making of the nation itself.

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      Posted by:Stephen J. Pyne
      Published :2018-05-17T21:11:18+00:00

    One thought on “How the Canyon Became Grand: A Short History”

    1. I saw the Grand Canyon for the first time last summer. I thought, "Wow, it looks just like the pictures." Then "it fills me with awe just like everyone says, just like I've seen people react in movies." Then I spent minutes trying to take it in and being genuinely moved. I assumed that my reaction was typical, universal. It is now, but as Stephen Pyne explains, it was not always so. When the Spanish first saw it in the 1500s, they peered over the rim, saw nothing of value, and left. Other Europe [...]

    2. Upon seeing the Grand Canyon for the first time two years ago, it was hard for me to know what to do. It feels strange to sit and stare for long stretches of time, but there it seems called for in order to take in all that is the Grand Canyon: the geological wonder, the roiling river, and the stark landscape. When perusing books in the gift shop on the South Rim, I was immediately drawn to Over the Edge: Death in the Grand Canyon. The concept of falling, jumping or tripping over the edge was int [...]

    3. Quotable:The Colorado River was identified and mapped long before the St. Lawrence, the Columbia, the Hudson, or even the Mississippi. Yet the Canyon was among the last of these wonders to be assimilated, much less celebrated. As far as Spain and the rest of Europe were concerned, the discovered Canyon quickly became a lost Canyon. While the sails of European expansion had swiftly reached the Colorado River, the Renaissance died on the voyages upstream and the overland entradas across its chroma [...]

    4. I really enjoyed this book! I enjoyed the geology, the art and the intellectual discussions. A lot of history here. The writer also has some beautiful descriptions that read like poetry. "I have heard rumours of visitors who were disappointed. Thebsame people will be disappointed at the Day of Judgement. In fact, the Grand Canyon is a sort of landscape Day of Judgement. It is not a show place, a beauty spot, but a revelation." - J.B. Priestely (page 1)"But nothing lead to the Canyon. It came as [...]

    5. This brief, insightful and compelling narrative about how the "idea" of the Grand Canyon has evolved over time is a real gem. Pyne writes with a clarity that is rare, with gentle wit, compassion, and prose that border on the poetic. Bringing together cultural influences as experienced by explorers, scientists, writers, and painters, Pyne's delicious tale reveals the often surprising multi-layered impressions and meanings the Canyon has managed to impart on so many of those who have written about [...]

    6. Newsday said "This extraordinary book puts the national landmark in the context of nothing less than the intellectual history of western civilization-in 200 pages" and that's exactly what it does. Have a dictionary along side, the author has a wide ranging vocabulary. Excellent scholarship,well written,highly recommended.

    7. Interesting story of how the Grand Canyon was mapped, explored and studies by geologists, biologists and the like. It gave a story of how it became famous and an American icon. A bit dry though. This book was okay.

    8. Just too dense. Had I been more familiar with the people or with the geology of the canyon, it might have been a good read. But as an introduction to the history of the canyon, I'm afraid it fails.

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