Resource Wars The New Landscape of Global Conflict From the oilfields of Saudi Arabia to the Nile delta from the shipping lanes of the South China Sea to the pipelines of Central Asia Resource Wars looks at the growing impact of resource scarcity on

  • Title: Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict
  • Author: Michael T. Klare
  • ISBN: 9780805055764
  • Page: 135
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the oilfields of Saudi Arabia to the Nile delta, from the shipping lanes of the South China Sea to the pipelines of Central Asia, Resource Wars looks at the growing impact of resource scarcity on the military policies of nations International security expert Michael T Klare argues that in the early decades of the new millennium, wars will be fought not over ideologyFrom the oilfields of Saudi Arabia to the Nile delta, from the shipping lanes of the South China Sea to the pipelines of Central Asia, Resource Wars looks at the growing impact of resource scarcity on the military policies of nations International security expert Michael T Klare argues that in the early decades of the new millennium, wars will be fought not over ideology but over access to dwindling supplies of precious natural commodities The political divisions of the Cold War, Klare asserts, have given way to a global scramble for oil, natural gas, minerals, and water And as armies throughout the world define resource security as a primary objective, widespread instability is bound to follow, especially in those areas where competition for essential materials overlaps with long standing territorial and religious disputes In this clarifying view, the recent explosive conflict between the United States and Islamic extremism stands revealed as the predictable consequence of consumer nations seeking to protect the vital resources they depend on.A much needed assessment of a changed world, Resource Wars is a compelling look at warfare in an era of rampant globalization and intense economic competition.

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      Published :2019-03-07T02:45:49+00:00

    One thought on “Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict”

    1. The book Resource Wars, the New Landscape of Global Conflict by Michael T. Klare supports what I believe is a two-perspective concept in human conflict behavior. While the Middle East is not the only places where the West, especially the United States, purchase its oil, oil itself is not the only sought after resource. Resource Wars brilliantly exposes specific geographical regions of the world under constant conflict for critical natural resources such as precious metals, water, and of course, [...]

    2. Good information, but dated (published in 2001, pre-9/11). Most of the general concepts are already taught in general geopolitical courses. The details were informative and made the read worthwhile.

    3. Somewhat dated now (in a poignant piece of irony, the author says in the introduction that "At the time of this writing - early December 2001 - it appears that Osama bin Laden will soon be captured or killed.") And of course I'm writing this review in August of 2011, a few months after it actually finally happened.However, the rest of Klare's forecasts have held up quite a bit better over the near-decade since this book came out, and it looks as if the wars over resources he predicts - primarily [...]

    4. A bit dated--- the research dates from the mid-1990s, and the latest events treated by the book are in early 2000 ---but nonetheless interesting. It's a good introduction to the connections between non-renewable resources and interstate conflict. Klare discusses not just oil and gas, but also (and probably more importantly for the mid-21st century) water conflicts and the use of natural resources (timber, precious stones) to fund conflicts. Not a bad starting point for anyone interested in how d [...]

    5. This book is badly dated, somewhat self-indulgent, and contains basically no information that isn't covered better by later books. The omission of resource politics in the United States (e.g. California, Arizona, and Colorado fighting over the increasingly finite amount of water in the Colorado River basin) is also a serious oversight. Overall, I can see why the professor for my International System class in 2004 assigned this book at the time (well, other than the fact that he appeared to know [...]

    6. This book reminds me of one thing: Mad Max. The author contends that increasing population levels and urbanization will result in future conflicts over the basic resources of life: water, arable land, oil, etc. Wars fought for increasing an empire will seem romantic compared with what's to come. Great stocking stuffer.

    7. This is an interesting and well researched book, though obviously a bit obsolete as policy type books tend to do that rather quickly. Even so, it is a very good analysis of international relations and a useful perspective on the thinking at a fixed point in time (namely ca. 1999).

    8. Not bad but I thought he was missing the huge factor of oil conflict. It was in the book of course but that needed its own book which he later wrote. That next book was perhaps a little informative but to anybody that checks sources it was way to biased.

    9. Klare talks about impending shortfalls in oil and other natural resources and the challenges it will pose for the international order. It's worth reading something by him, and this would be the one I recommend. I have read other stuff by Klare, but it seems repetitive.

    10. Could be rated as very good. Contains all essential information needed. However, the book looks into several geostrategic areas, and thus the perspective, the depth of research and the resulting thoughts on the conflicts appear shallow/incomplete/not credible.

    11. This book is a shallow treatment of resource wars--especially those involving energy. If you are looking for a brief into to the topic, this isn't a bad one but it isn't anything special.

    12. Not exactly what you would call a page turner, but thorough, clear and informative. Important subject matter. I will read anything Klare writes.

    13. somehow this text comes off as tedious, when it really shouldn't have been. author is a fine presenter of the subject matter otherwise.

    14. in addition to reviewing the coming oil shortage, Klare also describes the potential water shortage problem, which may be even more brutal

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