The Harbor Poole worked as a journalist where he campaigned for social reforms including an end to child labor On the outbreak of the First World War he worked as a war correspondent for The Saturday Evenin

  • Title: The Harbor
  • Author: Ernest Poole
  • ISBN: 9781417933372
  • Page: 198
  • Format: Paperback
  • 1915 Poole worked as a journalist where he campaigned for social reforms including an end to child labor On the outbreak of the First World War he worked as a war correspondent for The Saturday Evening Post The Harbor is his novel about trade unions The book begins You chump, I thought contemptuously I was seven years old at the time, and the gentleman to whom I ref1915 Poole worked as a journalist where he campaigned for social reforms including an end to child labor On the outbreak of the First World War he worked as a war correspondent for The Saturday Evening Post The Harbor is his novel about trade unions The book begins You chump, I thought contemptuously I was seven years old at the time, and the gentleman to whom I referred was Henry Ward Beecher What is was that aroused my contempt for the man will be fore fully understood if I tell first of the grudge I bore him.

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      Published :2018-09-13T11:18:18+00:00

    One thought on “The Harbor”

    1. I ran across a review of The Harbor that said it was one of the few accessible novels of protest fiction, up there with the Grapes of Wrath. Tying it to my second favorite Steinbeck novel was a good reason for me to grab this book. [In Dubious Battle is my favorite Steinbeck work.] The Harbor is a long book, coming in at almost 400 pages on my Kindle, but it is worth the effort, and the flow is effortless.The book chronicles the life of the narrator, Bill, who grew up in Brooklyn, overlooking th [...]

    2. Seemed well written and actually started out pretty good, but got very dull after the first few chapters. I skimmed ahead and saw nothing that inspired me to continue, so I never finished it.

    3. Ernest Poole won the first ever Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1918 for His Family, but it was his novel of three years earlier, The Harbor, that remains his most lasting work. It's the story of a journalist named Billy (surely based on Poole himself), who grows up in a comfortable middle class house overlooking a harbor that his father runs as a small businessman. However, the harbor soon leaves his father behind as it becomes one huge corporate entity (along with the railroads) financed by Wall [...]

    4. “The Harbor” is Ernest Poole’s best known work, although his later work, “His Family”, would be the first novel to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1918. “The Harbor was published in 1915, and the novel is among the first, if not the first, to present labor unions in a positive light. Though certainly a gritty novel for its time, I would not doubt that many readers today might find it rather tame. Ernest Poole clearly had sympathy for socialist causes, and this can be found in much of his w [...]

    5. I was assigned this book as part of a Modernist literature class at the University of Akron and I was quite surprised on how much I liked it. Many assigned novels are usually interesting but I wouldn't say that I read them for pleasure. This book was different and I enjoyed it a lot. Especially the first 2 sections of the book. There are many great scenes in the second half of the book but I think the first half was written much better. Billy wants to be a writer and to be a good writer he feels [...]

    6. THE HARBOR. (1915). Ernest Poole. ****. Ernest Poole (1880-1950) was born and raised in Chicago, and was a journalist in the early days of his career. He was a member of the muck-raking school, writing articles on a variety of industrial injustices imposed on the average working man. His Socialist leanings took him to all parts of the world, including Russia, where he worked with John Reed on several articles. After a slow start, he finally emerged as a successful novelist with the publication o [...]

    7. This is an interesting book. In my opinion, it is one of the best social protest books in American literature. It deals with early 20th century feminist concerns—suffrage, the woman's place in the work force, and the woman's role in the family, especially regarding child-rearing responsibilities. It looks into labor vs capital relations, workplace safety, and general working conditions. And of course New York harbor is the central theme. We see the harbor through the point of view of three dif [...]

    8. Something I read to broaden my horizonsPulitzer Prize winner Ernest Poole wrote "The Harbor" just before WWI broke out and is set during that period. It describes the love-hate relationship between the main character, Billy, and the NY harbor. He experiences the best and worst of life as he explores and writes about the harbor, and the harbor really becomes a character in the novel. I enjoyed the parts about Billy's childhood, but I got bogged down later on in the story. It occurred to me that " [...]

    9. Interesting period piece. The story of a bourgeois dilatant who discovers the grim underside of turn-of-the-19th-century industrialism. The harbor in question is New York. A history of how the harbor has changed since the age of sail, and the social and economic consequences of that change, is woven in to the story of the protagonist’s family. Through his protagonist, the author presents the case for the ideology of the “great man”. At this time, there was a widespread idea that all of soc [...]

    10. Gung-ho fresh-faced boy wanders New York harbor, starting from his boyhood forays down Brooklyn Heights. Determined to find authentic heart of American experience in industrial metropolis and sooty harbor. Full of turn-of-the century labor radicalism, written by a journalist who participated in Patterson Silk Strike Pageant and befriended Bill Haywood, Elizabeth Gurley Flynn and John Reed. This is less the tracery of cables pinning the Brooklyn Bridge to East River shores and more a close-up of [...]

    11. It took a while for the book to really get going, it was not until the last quarter of the book that it really began to incite my passion for reading about stuff like this. I think "The Jungle" by Sinclair spoiled this genre for me; it is an absolute masterpiece of early 20th century "socialist" literature from page one till the end. But leaving "Jungle" aside, "The Harbor" stands out as more of an autobiography than a "muckraking" novel.

    12. The first book by Poole, he won a Pulitzer Prize for his second book, but critics generally think this was the better book. It follows the development of a harbor area in NYC, through the character as a child, a young man, and then a grown man. It essentially traces the industrialization of the US and the way that international trade changed US economic relations. It also traces the rise of unions in the US, which I enjoyed. Good book!

    13. 98-year-old novel about a young man's growing up alongside the NY harbor and gradually moving from sympathy for the movers and shakers to sympathy for the stokers, dockers, and "little men" who suffer for little pay. A "Socialist" novel, which ought to be better known. It is also almost a kind of metafiction or postmodern work, as the book becomes by its end the book its narrator has decided to write.

    14. Socialist muckraking in which the hero (Billy, no last name) tells the story of his growth from believer in art, to believer in capitalism, to a belliever in the revolution of the workers. Valuable more as a social document than as a significant work of literature.

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