Do All Indians Live in Tipis Questions and Answers from the National Museum of the American Indian If you ve ever wondered about where Native Americans came from whether they really used smoke signals or if they wore socks this book has the answers From clothing food origins ceremonies and l

  • Title: Do All Indians Live in Tipis?: Questions and Answers from the National Museum of the American Indian
  • Author: National Museum of the American Indian
  • ISBN: 9780061153013
  • Page: 133
  • Format: Paperback
  • If you ve ever wondered about where Native Americans came from, whether they really used smoke signals, or if they wore socks, this book has the answers From clothing, food, origins, ceremonies, and language to love, marriage, art, music, and casinos, DO ALL INDIANS LIVE IN TIPIS debunks widespread stereotypes and answers all of the most common questions about Native AmeIf you ve ever wondered about where Native Americans came from, whether they really used smoke signals, or if they wore socks, this book has the answers From clothing, food, origins, ceremonies, and language to love, marriage, art, music, and casinos, DO ALL INDIANS LIVE IN TIPIS debunks widespread stereotypes and answers all of the most common questions about Native Americans Accessible and enlightening, this is the perfect introduction to Native American history and contemporary culture.

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      133 National Museum of the American Indian
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      Posted by:National Museum of the American Indian
      Published :2018-010-20T21:36:05+00:00

    One thought on “Do All Indians Live in Tipis?: Questions and Answers from the National Museum of the American Indian”

    1. These short chapters make excellent reading passages for middle school students. The vocabulary is academic and might require some front loading. The Smithsonian should publish a teacher's guide and market it as curriculum. The readings lend themselves to a variety of question levels from knowledge and comprehension all the way up the hierarchical ladder to synthesis and evaluation. Maybe Bloom’s taxonomy is out of vogue, but I would guess it would work well for a common core curriculum, too.T [...]

    2. FAQ about Native American culture. The answers are only a page or two long so the authors don't get bogged down in too many details, but provide just enough information. I read this for work and it was just what I needed to develop a better sense of the "big picture." Now to work on all those details

    3. This book, written in Q&A form, is an excellent primer for those who have little knowledge of American Indians outside of the historically stereotypical portrayals conveyed in movies and other media. As I teach a lengthy unit on American Indians each year, I came in with a lot of background knowledge on the subject, but still deepened my schema on a few related topics and explored some questions I had never considered before, too.

    4. This book was given to me as a gift. The gift lies inside with the knowledge and explanation of American Indian stereotypes. This will be on my desk as a ready-resource in my classroom.

    5. The answer to the book’s title is no. Most live in houses and apartments like their fellow citizens. The buffalo hide tipi was the traditional dwelling for only the Plains Indians. Other questions cannot be answered as succinctly, for example, there isn’t a single answer about correct terminology. Is it correct to say American Indian, Indian, Native American, or Native or is it correct to say tribe of nation? There is no clear consensus on this, so it’s best to ask, “how would you like t [...]

    6. You know all those TOTALLY RACIST questions you want to ask but don't want to for fear that your super-progressive friends will hate you for the rest of your life? This book answers all of them. Short, 3-page-maximum passages that tackle a wide variety of commonly held beliefs and stereotypes, this is an excellent place to start if you feel overwhelmed by where to begin in your First Nation reeducation.I wish some of the articles had more source citations, but I imagine they were removed for bre [...]

    7. I loved this book. I've been asked some of these questions and I've wondered about some things myselfke tipis, Pocahontas, do the more fortunate tribes help out the less fortunate tribes, and the word squaw. I finally have a book that can give me real answers.The format is FAQ style and organized by theme, such as identity, housing, health, language, history, etc. This makes it easy to refer back to a question/answer at a later time. Most of the answers are short and to the point.I think I would [...]

    8. I can't say I've learned a lot of new facts from this book (with a notable exception of political and economical history of Native people from pre-colombian times up to the most recent). After all, the book is clearly targeted primarily to much younger people than myself.However, the main theme of the book is regaining dignity and self-respect, but without scorning or dishonoring someone else, without trying to fabulate some imaginary greatness. Expressed in a language quite unfamiliar to inhabi [...]

    9. The short answers to questions people may be embarrassed to ask is a good way of bridging the gap with misinformation and stereotypes being dispelled.

    10. Very informative. Well-written answers to questions about different aspects of the Native American cultures.

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