How We Got Here A Slightly Irreverent History of Technology and Markets Best selling author Andy Kessler ties up the loose ends from his provocative book Running Money with this history of breakthrough technology and the markets that funded them Expanding on themes firs

  • Title: How We Got Here: A Slightly Irreverent History of Technology and Markets
  • Author: Andy Kessler
  • ISBN: 9780060840976
  • Page: 170
  • Format: Paperback
  • Best selling author Andy Kessler ties up the loose ends from his provocative book, Running Money, with this history of breakthrough technology and the markets that funded them.Expanding on themes first raised in his tour de force, Running Money, Andy Kessler unpacks the entire history of Silicon Valley and Wall Street, from the Industrial Revolution to computers, communicaBest selling author Andy Kessler ties up the loose ends from his provocative book, Running Money, with this history of breakthrough technology and the markets that funded them.Expanding on themes first raised in his tour de force, Running Money, Andy Kessler unpacks the entire history of Silicon Valley and Wall Street, from the Industrial Revolution to computers, communications, money, gold and stock markets These stories cut by an unscrupulous editor from the original manuscript were intended as a primer on the ways in which new technologies develop from unprofitable curiosities to essential investments Indeed, How We Got Here is the book Kessler wishes someone had handed him on his first day as a freshman engineering student at Cornell or on the day he started on Wall Street This book connects the dots through history to how we got to where we are today.

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      Posted by:Andy Kessler
      Published :2019-01-24T12:22:51+00:00

    One thought on “How We Got Here: A Slightly Irreverent History of Technology and Markets”

    1. Some interesting chapters, but overall the book is an editing mess. Weirdly disconnected chapters and sometimes I got a feeling that I am reading something that was intended as a script for some TV series. Last part of the book seemed to be there mainly for autobiographical reasons. You are better off just reading the first 100 pages or so.

    2. I found Andy Kessler's "How We Got Here" to at times be a page turner. Consider the incredibly powerful computer you hold in your hand, pocket or purse and all the inventions it took in order to reach its potential - from the steam engine forward. It shows the breakthrough technology and the creation of the markets that funded them. Filled with many interesting details, I found myself reading sections out loud to my wife who at times (but not all the time :-)) was as surprised at the connections [...]

    3. As the subtitle says - it's a slightly irreverent history of technology and markets. If you're fairly well-read you probably could have written this book yourself after a bit of Wiki-surfing. (Or at least I know I could have Just kicking myself for not having done so.) But that's not the point. This is the kind of book that does the Wiki-surfing for you, in a readable and logical way. There are some new and interesting facts and connections I'd not quite appreciated. I'd not realised that the fi [...]

    4. I really liked this book, it was good, but it could have been much better. The author does a good job telling the story of technology and the stock markets but I think that better editing could have made this book great. To be fair, the subject matter was complex, and to me very interesting, but it did not flow as well as it could have. The author has had many careers and felt that the book should have some humor in it (and I agree) but he is not a stand-up comic and the book could have used les [...]

    5. Idiosyncratic recounting of the history of modern technology through the lens of the modern stock and venture capital markets with a lot of emphasis on the history of computing (as an enabler). I found the early parts interesting. But as things progressed to topics that I knew something about, his conclusions and explanations kept sounding a bit off to me. So I had pretty much lost faith by the time I got to the last quarter of the book, which turned into a highly political argument for complete [...]

    6. An insightful look at the process of technological development from the perspective of a tech investor. Kessler really seems to understand the difference between historical narrative and the "generator of history" (as NNT puts it) - he plunges into the non-linear path of historical progression without the usual false inevitability implied by standard historical narrative. This really impressed me with the value of tangible risk taking in sharpening critical thinking - Kessler is used to having " [...]

    7. A quick read. I liked the way he tied in history with markets and how technology not only fueled growth but eventually became the thing that propelled us forward. Money, technology, trading, markets--all go hand in hand and are extremely reliant upon each other. The only one of Mr. Kessler's book I have read, although I am familiar with his others via book reviews and the news.

    8. What the field of economic history needs, in my humble opinion, is more irreverence. Some people are experts in the history of economic growth, other people are experts in the history of technological growth, and the few people that are experts on both tend to take themselves entirally to seriously. Kessler at least provides an informative and entertaining introduction to the subject.

    9. I love this book. It's one of those books that, with good humor, provides some great 'threads' of innovation that have colored the movements and growth of technology and markets. As it suggests, it is slightly irreverent, which makes it all the more fun. Andy Kessler is a solid author who's style I find to be well flowing and quite enjoyable.

    10. Andy's best book. A very complicated yet straight analysis on the history of technology, and how event in the old days can still have relevance in today world

    11. Useful high-level, story-driven accounts of symbiotic evolution between computational devices and capital markets starting with the Industrial Revolution.

    12. nice economic/technological history from a former technology hedge fund manager. irreverent indeed but fun and quick to read.

    13. calles itself an "irreverant history." in the end its about how technology and market forces join forces: free markets bring funding for tech, tech brings more freedom to markets.

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