The Poetry of Thought From Hellenism to Celan With his hallmark forceful discernment George Steiner presents in The Poetry of Thought his magnum opus an examination of than two millennia of Western culture staking out his claim for the essentia

  • Title: The Poetry of Thought: From Hellenism to Celan
  • Author: George Steiner
  • ISBN: 9780811219457
  • Page: 254
  • Format: Hardcover
  • With his hallmark forceful discernment, George Steiner presents in The Poetry of Thought his magnum opus an examination of than two millennia of Western culture, staking out his claim for the essential oneness of great thought and great style Sweeping yet precise, moving from essential detail to bracing illustration, Steiner spans the entire history of philosophy inWith his hallmark forceful discernment, George Steiner presents in The Poetry of Thought his magnum opus an examination of than two millennia of Western culture, staking out his claim for the essential oneness of great thought and great style Sweeping yet precise, moving from essential detail to bracing illustration, Steiner spans the entire history of philosophy in the West as it entwines with literature, finding that, as Sartre stated, in all philosophy there is a hidden literary prose The poetic genius of abstract thought, Steiner believes, is lit, is made audible Argument, even analytic, has its drumbeat It is made ode What voices the closing movements of Hegel s Phenomenology better than Edith Piaf s non de non, a twofold negation which Hegel would have prized This essay is an attempt to listen closely.

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    One thought on “The Poetry of Thought: From Hellenism to Celan”

    1. "The phenomenology of pure thought is almost daemonic in its strangeness." I've thought that myself. But if you haven't read the books of the hierophantic, hyper-erudite George Steiner, this book is probably not the place to begin. (Visit In Bluebeard's Castle.)The temper of Steiner's mandarin musings has always been a bit feverish, the mood that of the "crisis theologians" of the 20th century, of existentialist extremity. Ultimate realities are often at stake. For the reader this means the hig [...]

    2. George Steiner is a syncretist in the best sense of the word. Like Fredric Jameson, his main powers are those of summary and synthesis, with each of his books being a journey through, and explanation of, the entire Western tradition. The Poetry of Thought is no different. A master stylist and formidable thinker in his own right, Steiner seeks to show the common linguistic ground of literature and philosophy, that both depend upon "style." As he writes in the introduction, "Argument, even analyti [...]

    3. Masterpiece de erudición y camino. George Steiner, lector prolífico y comentador admirable, portador de la avidez propia de un Borges o un Bloom o un Szondi, nos presenta una historia abreviada de la 'filosofía occidental' desde la relación entre su lenguaje y el propio de la literatura, arguyendo que ambos están íntimamente conectados, y que se influyen mutuamente.El razonamiento de Steiner a veces se fuga en meandros anecdóticos o poéticos, en comentarios parentéticos alusivos (tres p [...]

    4. Why have I become addicted to reading George Steiner? Oblique answers below.This is an essay—and Steiner stresses that it is indeed an “essay,” in the Montaignean sense of “trial”—about the failure of philosophy. Philosophy has longed to be like mathematics or music: a mode of pure reason, mastering human experience because unsullied by reference to experience’s inevitable and perhaps ungovernable mess and murk. But philosophy takes place in language, and language is, whatever else [...]

    5. George Steiner sets out in this "short essay", his own words to: "The point I am trying to clarify is simple: literature and philosophy as we have known them are products of language. Unalterably that is the common ontological and substantive ground . Thought in poetry, the poetics of thought are deeds of grammar, of language in motion. Their, means, their constraints are those of style. The unspeakable, in the direct sense of that word, circumscribes both."and he contends that "Poetry aims to r [...]

    6. I first I was a little disappointed with the discursive quality of this essay but realized that Steiner was sharing so deeply held thoughts in this short essay and I was privileged to be let in on them. I am lucky to have the gift of Steiner’s lifetime of serious reading and thinking.

    7. Taking a cue from Martin Heidegger's Denken und Dichten, the author moves beyond mere erudition (which in George Steiner is vast, compelling and programmatic) and intertextuality (or I might in this instance call it meta-intertextuality) into the ineluctable observation that the reach of both philosophy and poetry is by a common effort and by the same hand limited but mutually informing and supporting. It is a place of great care for the project of reflection (at least insofar as the Western tho [...]

    8. The last paragraphs: "The radical break with the western historical past would be that of ephemerality. It would entail the deliberate acceptance of the momentary and the transient. There would be no avowed aspirations to immortality. These would be left to the French Academicians. Lines of verse claiming to outlast bronze would be entombed in the archives. Citation would become an esoteric practice and arrogance. The self-destruct, the effacing sweep of death would not only be accepted but some [...]

    9. The book was interesting, but it felt like I was reading lecture notes, or an outline to a much larger book. The book did, however, expand my to-read list."But an axis of differentiation is at work. There are the builders of systems, the architects of enclosure and addicts of totality such as Aristotle, Hegel or Comte. And there are the raiders, often solitary, on meaning and the world, the technicians of lightening striking as it were from the periphery, “lightning” being in both Heraclitus [...]

    10. I read this pretty quickly, maybe a slower reading would have revealed more. Perhaps Steiner expected his audience to find the notion that philosophical thought and the linguistic modes of its expression are intimately related to be more striking than I found it. And perhaps in certain circles such a notion runs against common opinion. In this way, the book did not convince me of anything new. But Steiner's writing is beautiful and often bracing, and there were a smattering of remarks and insigh [...]

    11. Een interessant essay over de verbinding tussen literatuur en poezie. Steiner begint bij Plato en eindigt in onze tijd. Aan het eind is het vooral de vebinding tussen Paul Celan en de Duitse (nazi)filosoof Heidegger. Hij beslaat eigenlijk de hele westerse beschaving, Chinese of Japanse denkers komen niet aan bod. Aan te bevelen, als je in het onderwerp geinteresseerd bent; anders misschien wel wat taai.

    12. I am not an intellectual, the book is well suited, I think, to intellectuals. However it is not difficult for the ordinary man such as myself to enjoy this well thought out and well presented work, especially if one is seeking references for future name dropping. I enjoyed the book, and I have already used quotations from this same source to impress others. Alas I received no response to my correspondence, such is the way of lost love.

    13. Maybe you'll find this book comprehensible if you have a serious background in German philosophy, but I personally found it largely unreadable. Though he clearly didn't intend to do so, Steiner's prose did a swell job of propelling me toward anti-intellectualism.Also no one should use the word 'hermeneutic' that much.

    14. Brain candy for the end of the humanist tradition. Careful thought, Baroque prose, with an eye to the horizon.

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