Children of the Holocaust Conversations with Sons and Daughters of Survivors I set out to find a group of people who like me were possessed by a history they had never lived The daughter of Holocaust survivors Helen Epstein traveled from America to Europe to Israel searchi

  • Title: Children of the Holocaust: Conversations with Sons and Daughters of Survivors
  • Author: Helen Epstein
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 228
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • I set out to find a group of people who, like me, were possessed by a history they had never lived The daughter of Holocaust survivors, Helen Epstein traveled from America to Europe to Israel, searching for one vital thin in common their parent s persecution by the Nazis She found Gabriela Korda, who was raised by her parents as a German Protestant in South America Alb I set out to find a group of people who, like me, were possessed by a history they had never lived The daughter of Holocaust survivors, Helen Epstein traveled from America to Europe to Israel, searching for one vital thin in common their parent s persecution by the Nazis She found Gabriela Korda, who was raised by her parents as a German Protestant in South America Albert Singerman, who fought in the jungles of Vietnam to prove that he, too, could survive a grueling ordeal Deborah Schwartz, a Southern beauty queen who at the Miss America pageant, played the same Chopin piece that was played over Polish radio during Hitler s invasion.Epstein interviewed hundreds of men and women coping with an extraordinary legacy In each, she found shades of herself.

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      Posted by:Helen Epstein
      Published :2019-01-03T13:53:39+00:00

    One thought on “Children of the Holocaust: Conversations with Sons and Daughters of Survivors”

    1. "Helen Epstein is a daughter of Holocaust survivors. A writer, professor, journalist, she searched from America to Europe to Israel gathering hundreds of stories from men and women who shared her trauma. Although these children of the Holocaust were raised in freedom and security, only the most profound courage could turn their legacy of searing tragedy into a lesson of hope, understanding and endurance.Sometimes tragic, sometimes triumphant, stories of sons and daughters of survivors."

    2. I've read a number of books about the Holocaust, but this was very different. It explored the psychological impact of the suffering of the survivors on their children. Epstein interviewed many adult children and found a number of similarities between them. She also discussed several studies that have been done about these children. There were also quite a few interesting facts about survivors regarding the displaced person's camps and how difficult it was to emigrate to the U.S Canada, Australia [...]

    3. While interesting, this book read more like a research paper. i learned that most survivors didn't want to talk about their lives in the camps, so this was mainly about the children and how they felt while growing up.

    4. This book leapt out at me as I passed it on the shelves at my local library. Although, I do not specifically think of myself as a child of a holocaust survivor, my recent discovery of my mother's hidden Jewish heritage and my grandparents efforts to conceal it in the Nazi-occupied Netherlands made the concepts discussed in this book eerily familiar. The author well describes this vague yet powerful unease:For years it lay in an iron box buried so deep inside me that I was never sure just what it [...]

    5. A powerful story -- especially the first half when the effects of the trauma first come into view I was disappointed by the chapters following the decision to leave Israel. The story at this point requires a distinction between suffering as a shared human experience and the legacy of suffering as part of family history. My impression was that the book responds to this need by presenting more and more extreme instances of maladjustment.I understand that the composition of the book dictates such a [...]

    6. A very good first person narrative of the child of Holocaust survivors, and the interviews that she conducted with the children of fellow survivors. Epstein not only presents the pressure she grew up under, high expectations from her parents as an example, she discovers that her and her parents' behavior were similar to the that of others in her peer group. Epstein's focus is on Holocaust survivors, but she not ignore the impact of surviving horrors has on others (she uses other genocide survivo [...]

    7. A quite comprehensive series of paraphrased interviews with the children of Holocaust survivors of various social strata and places of origin in Eastern and Central Europe. Similarities in life experiences and psychological profiles are described, but mostly they are highly intelligent, successful people, dealing with "second-hand" trauma. Very little of the ones who did not succeed, were not brilliant is explored. Mostly children of parents who were, before the war, mid to upper class Jews. Som [...]

    8. The lack of decent moral behavior of the holocaust surviors and their children left me disgusted. So many of the survivors turned to sex and alcohol to deal with life. Many had not been practicing Jews before WWII and neither they nor their children lived particularly uplifting lives. The focus of most of the surviors was to make money and their children was to spend the money. Debauchery would describe many of their lives. The book was poorly writteen and it was often difficult to distinquish i [...]

    9. This book made me see the holocaust in a completely new perspective. I understood more after hearing about someone's life that was in it. I think this book was worth the read and anyone can benefit from this novel and the story behind it. The only critique I would give, is that in some places of the book it is kind of dry and confusing. However, overall this is a great book about the tragic event.

    10. Although I started to read this book as research for a paper about Holocaust memoirs, I am finding it to be much more readable than I had expected."Our cars, which we kept until they broke down, were the only possessions my parents had which I felt they could not live without.The car was a ticket to the boundless space of America"

    11. An interesting study on what effect the Holocaust had on the children of those who survived it. All of us are parented by our parent's past, but none on such a grand scale. A good read, especially if you are interested ways the same experience can be seen and interpreted differently by so many people.

    12. Although this book is several years old I only recently discovered it. I found the subject totally fascinating - a second generation study into the repercussions of being a Holocaust survivor.Obviously not a novel but written in a very easy to read format the similarities and differences of the parenting styles of the survivors and the effects on their children is fascinating.

    13. There was one quote from the book that I think summarizes it's purpose, "unless we start examining the Holocaust with our emotions, all we will pass on to future generations is numbers." I think this was a very interesting read from an interesting perspective of the long standing and generational effects the Holocaust had on its victims.

    14. A little dry in places, but material that made you think about the holocaust from a completely new perspective. You begin wondering how you would deal with the situation.

    15. It's wonderful book, finally giving some room for free floating anxieties around the extremes of the human condition as they happen in your own family, even when one is perfectly safe oneself!

    16. A fascinating read, and a thought-provoking contribution to our understanding of how World War II and the Holocaust is still playing out in some lives

    17. This was a good book on educating me on children that were born to survivors after the war. And how they delt with there parents suffering.

    18. If this is the book I read for my sophmore english class, it was some depressing stuff. It's terrible what people can do to each other.

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