Shieldwall The year is and England burns while the Viking armies blockade the great city of London King Ethelred lies dying and the England he knew dies with him the warring kingdoms of Mercia Wessex and N

  • Title: Shieldwall
  • Author: Justin Hill
  • ISBN: 9781408702789
  • Page: 480
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The year is 1016 and England burns while the Viking armies blockade the great city of London King Ethelred lies dying and the England he knew dies with him the warring kingdoms of Mercia, Wessex and Northymbria tremble on the brink of great change.

    • é Shieldwall || Æ PDF Download by ✓ Justin Hill
      480 Justin Hill
    • thumbnail Title: é Shieldwall || Æ PDF Download by ✓ Justin Hill
      Posted by:Justin Hill
      Published :2018-09-18T12:18:06+00:00

    One thought on “Shieldwall”

    1. Shieldwall is, I think, the best evocation of late Anglo-Saxon England that I've read. It's the turn of the second millennium and England is cursed with probably the worst king it has ever suffered - Ethelred - and also, strangely but equally, the country is cursed with a people that are too faithful to their unworthy king. Despite Ethelred's cowardice, duplicity and treachery, they stick with him through everything. Hill does a fine job of showing the reader how intertwined the House of Cerdic, [...]

    2. I heard Justin Hill speak about this book at a Medievalist conference earlier this year, and I bought it on the spot. The story is set in the same historical period in which I am writing, and because I am attempting to tell a story that focuses on the women of this time, I was interested in seeing how a male author would deal with the same material and characters. What I found were similarities – after all, we based our stories on the same events – and huge differences. In Hill’s book I co [...]

    3. What a delightful surprise! I did not have great hopes for this from reading some of the reviewers' takes on it but it was excellent! Historically as accurate as you can be about a poorly recorded era, the language evoked an earlier time without ever descending into 'writing forsoothly'. The story is about Godwin, the father of Harold Godewinson, a particular historical hero of mine, and also necessarily covers Edward Ironside, another. The author never makes them superhuman and certain passages [...]

    4. As I studied this period at degree level, I was braced for the worst however I was very impressed, especially by the author's subtle inclusion of contemporary sources, such as charters, poems and the Chronicle into the dialogue and text.

    5. I'm giving up on this book. I had to pause it to do a group read and while it wasn't thrilling me when I paused it, it did even less for me when I restarted it.It is one of those weird books that has an important plotline from the middle of the book at the start, which effectively ruined the start of the book for me. I do not like spoilers at any stage of a book. The author led in with the protracted death of a main character and I thought the story would take off from there, only it didn't. Ins [...]

    6. Wow! I felt like I had lived a whole life through this book and in a way we have and a life of one Godwin Wulfnothson. You may only recognise the first name and not the last. This because as much as an incredibly hard yet deeply honourable life Godwin led we all know more about his son, Harold. I shouldnt have to explain why.I think the reason I loved this story so deeply is due to the little details, small glimpses, daily delights that kept reminding me as a reader that all these characters wer [...]

    7. 4.5 stars as Shieldwall was absolutely fantastic. The beginning was a little slow and the ending felt slightly rushed, but everything inbetween was great. The descriptions and the voice of the novel are lovely - I really felt like I understood the time period and was able to become immersed in it. The way that Hill was able to build up the Anglo-Saxon culture without spelling it out impressed me. The other element I found very well balanced was the blood and guts, which while being healthily spr [...]

    8. I was drawn to Shieldwall because it's set in the early 11th century during the final years of Ethelred The Unready's reign,and then his son's,King Edmund II or Edmund Ironside,all to brief reign. As far as I'm aware it's the first time this era has been given the historical fiction treatment. The central character is Godwin Wulfnothson,who later became the Earl Of Essex,and is the father of King Harold. Godwin is befriended by Edmund when they're children and we travel with them through the nex [...]

    9. There seems to be a fair amount of books coming out from this time period at presentd me I'm happy as larry about it(who is larry BTW??) anyway, the book is well written if after a well paced start it slows for a touch then slowly picks up paced into a tale that lifts the reader and takes him along with the changes in the History of England.I'm the type of reader who likes to be educated while i read but not at the expense of the pace and the plot, this is fiction after all, Justin keeps his aud [...]

    10. Great historical fiction based around factual events in the early 11th century. The language and the meter used gives a real sense of place. The characters are likeable and strong and the book well-paced. Thoroughly enjoyable.

    11. Shieldwall by Justin Hill is the first book in a planned trilogy encapsulating the historical events that surround the Battle of Hastings and the fall of Anglo-Saxon England. Hill is an established and award winning writer, but this is his first foray into English historical fiction.The StoryShieldwall is set roughly 50 years before the Battle of Hastings, and is the story of Godwin Wulfnothson’s rise to power from hostage son of an Anglo-Saxon Thegn to the Jarl or Earl of Wessex. It’s a sto [...]

    12. Yes, the same Justin Hill wrote "the Drink and Dream Teahouse" and at first, it's difficult to reconcile the fact that two so seemingly different books were written with the same pen. But, once you start reading Shieldwall, what seems like a straight up serving of medieval historical literature quickly becomes a homage to and reflection of the Anglo-Saxon poetry that clearly inspired it. A ripping, exciting read that's good for you, too.

    13. Shieldwall by Justin Hill is the first book in a planned trilogy encapsulating the historical events that surround the Battle of Hastings and the fall of Anglo-Saxon England. Hill is an established and award winning writer, but this is his first foray into English historical fiction.The StoryShieldwall is set roughly 50 years before the Battle of Hastings, and is the story of Godwin Wulfnothson’s rise to power from hostage son of an Anglo-Saxon Thegn to the Jarl or Earl of Wessex. It’s a sto [...]

    14. This book is not typical of this type of fiction. It was a good and enjoyable read, not quite in the same league as Bernard Cromwell's Uhtred series or Giles Kristian's Raven series, but I look forward to reading the follow-up.The author made great strides to try and develop the character, although this led to the story meandering somewhat and failed slightly because the love-interest in the story is not a particularly interesting character to the reader. Also the story seemed to rush to a close [...]

    15. Breathtaking historical novel set around the events leading up to the battle of Ashingdon in 1016. England is in peril King Ethelred is dying and his son, Edmund Ironsides, takes a young man, Godwin to his side and together they ride to war against King Knut and the fearsome Danes. Stunningly told and very gripping. The battle descriptions are awesome.

    16. Set in 1016, this is the story of Godwin and his loyalty to his king Edmund Ironside and their fight against the Danes and Knut. This is a well researched, historical novel. The author sticks to the historical facts as much as he can, telling a plausible story where there are no facts. The characters are believable, the battle scenes are gory, the story well written.

    17. Very good book. A little surprised at the ending, but at the same time it clears up any time line issues with the next book (if that makes sense). Definitely worth a read.

    18. A nicely written and paced novel, rich with drama and intrigue and which begins at the start of a momentous period for what was beginning to become England. The 11th Century.If '11th Century' says nothing to you - 1066 was the second half of the 11th Century. Better?But that's not just for fun, because this is actually a novel set in England of the early 11th Century, a century of invasions, clearly. Vikings are banging on Englands door every few years, they invade and conquer a couple of times, [...]

    19. I bought this book ages ago and it's sat on my bookshelf overlooked ever since. For some reason I could never quite bring myself to start reading it. However, after reading several Roman books in a row I finally decided on a change and took the plunge and I wasn't disappointed. Set 50 years before the more popular battles of 1066, this is a fascinating insight into the life of the people who lived under King Ethelred and then King Edmund. I am a huge fan of Bernard Cornwell's "warrior" series se [...]

    20. Terrific first chapter but I'm a Did Not Finish on page 166. See how persistent I was? It's not going to live up to the beginning. Can I have a whole book like the first chapter? That was five stars, with its elegy and inglory - an inglorious end, and the mood of the Old English elegies that were heavily quoted. I felt for Wulfnoth and I was happy to go back and see what led him to this. I thought his death seen ahead might give a sense of fatedness - that ingredient of the sad courage you find [...]

    21. I picked this book up as a make weight in a 3 for £5 offer and I'm so glad I did. The story is well paced with good strong characters and a great storyline. I had to keep referring to the list of place names in the front of the book as the author uses contemporary place names rather than the modern names we all know. I can't wait for book two in the trilogy. All in all an excellent tale.

    22. Could have used a bit of editing, but overall the history was good, especially given how little is known of the period. It was nice to see a sympathetic portrayal of Godwin and of people in general -- neither the Danes nor the English were villainized, with only one or two exceptions.

    23. I really enjoyed this book, it gave me a real insight into the life of Godwin. A great book for anyone into English/Viking history.

    24. really good book , slow to start with , but the pace picks up and it sticks close to the facts of the era with a few embellishments , well worth the read

    25. A good story telling of the historical facts around the turn of the years 1000 to 1018 in England.

    26. Justin Hill's Shieldwall is the first in a flurry of historical fiction dealing with Late Saxon England (Patricia Bracewell followed soon after). It's an era full of drama, death, and scheming and I'm surprised authors are just now taking advantage of it. In Shieldwall, Godwin, the son of a minor noble, finds himself caught in cycles of revenge, deadly political dogfights, and a battle for the soul of England itself. Viking invasions bring the country to its knees, but Godwin rallies around the [...]

    27. I picked up this book in a PDSA charity shop in Newcastle upon Tyne England yonks ago, and it's taken me a long time to get down to read it. Although, rather a slow beginning, and slow to get into it, it's a great read, covering a fascinating turning point in English history. It charters the early life and fortunes, politically and militarily, of Godwin, Earl of Sussex, who would later exert considerable influence in the reigns of the Danish king, Knut, and Edward the Confessor. Packed with inci [...]

    28. Interesting, well written story featuring Godwin, Earl of Wessex, together with Edmund Ironside the brief king of Wessex before Cnut. It is an interesting story with a lot of historical content and takes place at a time when the English lived in constant fear of the Vikings. Always in a dilemma whether to fight or subjugate themselves to the Vikings demands the important Saxon families were often undecided what to do or who to support and of course the peasantry had to comply with their overlord [...]

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