A Theology for the Social Gospel Reprint of Edition The Social Gospel movement was a Protestant Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the late th century and early th century The movement applied Ch

  • Title: A Theology for the Social Gospel
  • Author: Walter Rauschenbusch
  • ISBN: 9781891396526
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Paperback
  • 2010 Reprint of 1918 Edition The Social Gospel movement was a Protestant Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the late 19th century and early 20th century The movement applied Christian ethics to social problems, especially social justice, inequality, liquor, crime, racial tensions, slums, bad hygiene, child labor, weak labor unions, poor schools, a2010 Reprint of 1918 Edition The Social Gospel movement was a Protestant Christian intellectual movement that was most prominent in the late 19th century and early 20th century The movement applied Christian ethics to social problems, especially social justice, inequality, liquor, crime, racial tensions, slums, bad hygiene, child labor, weak labor unions, poor schools, and the danger of war Theologically, the Social Gospel leaders were overwhelmingly post millennialist in the sense that they believed the Second Coming could not happen until humankind had rid itself of social evils by human effort Social Gospel leaders were predominantly associated with the Progressive Movement and most were theologically liberal, although they were typically conservative when it came to their views on social issues Walter Rauschenbusch was one of the leaders of this important Christian movement.

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      498 Walter Rauschenbusch
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      Published :2018-012-03T05:30:13+00:00

    One thought on “A Theology for the Social Gospel”

    1. Walter Rauschenbusch states in his 1917 work, A Theology for the Social Gospel: “We have a social gospel. We need a systematic theology large enough to match it and vital enough to back it.” This is the first statement in the book under the chapter heading. It seems at first to be a very agreeable comment that we should all board quickly. However, it very clearly points to Rauschenbusch’s heart and own personal theology. If we are in the business of modeling our theology to something man-d [...]

    2. A Theology for the Social Gospel is one of the most important works of Christian theology of the last one hundred years and the premiere catalyst for modern liberal Christian thought in the United States following the emergence of the social gospel movement. Walter Rauschenbusch (1861-1918), a graduate of the Rochester Theological Seminary (now known as Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School), was a Baptist preacher of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries who served for eleven yea [...]

    3. The Nature of Sin and Salvation When attempting to manufacture a systematic theology, the nature of sin and salvation becomes integral components of the position. Slight changes in these core beliefs cause vast differences externally. Having previously labored toward the notion of “the social gospel,” Walter Rauschenbusch writes A Theology for the Social Gospel with the aims to fill in the gaps. Interestingly, Rauschenbusch begins his endeavor under clearly inductive principles. Where many t [...]

    4. Rauschenbusch saw the need to further develop the budding theology of the social gospel from his formidable debut in Christianity and the Social Crisis. Here he expands his thinking into the different loci of theology: sin, salvation, God, Christ, eschatology, ecclesiology, atonement. While I don't agree with everything he has said, this review gives him 5 stars for its prophetic power, stylistic beauty, and theological originality. Much of what he said can be affirmed by even conservative Chris [...]

    5. Here is an old classic by a liberal theologian. I find that reading an occasional liberal is good for at least two reasons. First, it helps keep me honest about what liberals really believe. There is too much of a tendency to build the proverbial “straw man” without reference to what the other person actually said. Second, it helps me evaluate my own evangelical theology by opening it up to others for scrutiny. Sometimes I find inadequacies exposed, other times I find my own faith strengthen [...]

    6. An interesting approach to a--still common today--problem: capitalization. Rauschenbusch goes to great lengths to convince us that the nature of all sin is essentially selfishness, and promotes a refining of theology to account for not just the biological implications of original sin, but the social context that is of more relevance to us today. While he positions himself as a liberal theologian, I can't help but wonder how tendencies for post-millenialism fit in: he argues most for the kingdom [...]

    7. I know the words "important" and "revolutionary" get thrown around a lot when it comes to books. However, both apply here. Every Christian should read it. I haven't even finished processing it in my mind yet, but it has changed the way I see the gospel.

    8. I wish I had read this book a long time ago. It contains much material that seems as relevant today as it was in 1918.

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