Wandering Girl This is the true story of how a girl in Australia was taken from her parents and educated in a Catholic mission In she was forced to become a domestic on a wealthy estate where she woke before

  • Title: Wandering Girl
  • Author: Glenyse Ward
  • ISBN: 9780449704141
  • Page: 322
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • This is the true story of how a girl in Australia was taken from her parents and educated in a Catholic mission In 1965, she was forced to become a domestic on a wealthy estate, where she woke before dawn every day and slaved for fifteen hours She ate off a tin plate and slept on a shabby cot above a garage All because of the color of her skin This sort of thing wasn tThis is the true story of how a girl in Australia was taken from her parents and educated in a Catholic mission In 1965, she was forced to become a domestic on a wealthy estate, where she woke before dawn every day and slaved for fifteen hours She ate off a tin plate and slept on a shabby cot above a garage All because of the color of her skin This sort of thing wasn t supposed to happen any Here is the frightening yet victorious story of how it did and how that young woman who fought her way out An affecting memoirHer harrrowing story, dispassionately told, could well be fiction THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

    • ↠ Wandering Girl || ✓ PDF Read by ☆ Glenyse Ward
      322 Glenyse Ward
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ Wandering Girl || ✓ PDF Read by ☆ Glenyse Ward
      Posted by:Glenyse Ward
      Published :2019-01-09T04:26:06+00:00

    One thought on “Wandering Girl”

    1. Wandering Girl is a memoir of the first year of domestic service for young Aboriginal girl Glenyse Ward. She was taken from her mother as a small baby, raised on a mission by German nuns and brothers then sent out to work at age 16 (in 1965).I found myself cheering on 16 yr old Glenyse as she watched the family she worked for 'go off to town' and then cooked herself up a great meal of food she wasn't allowed to eat when the family was home, although she was expected to cook and serve it to them. [...]

    2. Wandering Girl was one of those books that I just kept being intrigued by every time I’d spot it on the library shelf. I’d never read anything by a female Australian aboriginal author, and so I decided that maybe I should. Glenyse Ward’s Wandering Girl is a spare and straightforward read. Ward was raised in a Catholic mission and then turned over as a domestic laborer to a wealthy, but cruel, white Australian household. This is the story of her struggles to be hopeful and to find a little [...]

    3. i wanted this memoir to be so much more. she tells her story without bitterness, which is amazing considering what she had to endure. about halfway through the book, i got bogged-down with the minutia of her life on the farm. her work load and lack of real human contact were certainly harrowing. but at parts it felt too much like a diary. i would have liked the end to go a little more in depth about her future life and the demise of mission schools. not being in Australia, my notions of that are [...]

    4. A tale about the Stolen Generation. I kept thinking that there was going to be something more sinister happen (esp. with the older man), as there was a fair bit of suspense around this (at least for me). Also, I felt that the book kind of just meandered along, without following much of a narrative structure. For me, I think other books have done this topic more justice.

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