Here Is New York Perceptive funny and nostalgic E B White s stroll around Manhattan remains the quintessential love letter to the city written by one of America s foremost literary figures The New York Times has n

  • Title: Here Is New York
  • Author: E.B. White Roger Angell Barbara Cohen Judith Stonehill
  • ISBN: 9781892145024
  • Page: 236
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Perceptive, funny, and nostalgic, E.B White s stroll around Manhattan remains the quintessential love letter to the city, written by one of America s foremost literary figures The New York Times has named Here is New York one of the ten best books ever written about the metropolis, and The New Yorker calls it the wittiest essay, and one of the most perceptive, ever donePerceptive, funny, and nostalgic, E.B White s stroll around Manhattan remains the quintessential love letter to the city, written by one of America s foremost literary figures The New York Times has named Here is New York one of the ten best books ever written about the metropolis, and The New Yorker calls it the wittiest essay, and one of the most perceptive, ever done on the city.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ Here Is New York | by ↠ E.B. White Roger Angell Barbara Cohen Judith Stonehill
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      Posted by:E.B. White Roger Angell Barbara Cohen Judith Stonehill
      Published :2018-09-05T16:05:26+00:00

    One thought on “Here Is New York”

    1. I have a fascination with NYC. It started as a small child, wanting to live there. I don't want to live there anymore but I try to visit as much as I can. This book is the perfect book to give me my fix. It's truly shows the authors love of New York. I've always felt New Yorkers were a different kind of person and this book brings that to life. It talks about all the odd, wonderful things that make NYC what it is. This is the authors love letter to New York. Thanks to Stephanie for getting me to [...]

    2. I've had a mad crush on E.B. White my entire life, and his books have followed me like a frisky shadow throughout my childhood, adolescence and adulthood. And now, I've found him here again, in my middle age and his middle age (circa 1948), each of us part-optimist, part-curmudgeon. . . arms not necessarily outstretched, but lovers of humanity both (as long as we're mostly shielded from it).His assignment here? To leave the peace of his domesticated bliss in North Brooklin, Maine and return to N [...]

    3. It's easy to see in these words Whites love for New York City. Although much has changed, many of the things he writes about still exist today. The diversity, a melding of races, nationalities, and languages, all co-existing in a mutual truce, and all held together by the common understanding that to do otherwise would be disaster.4+ stars.

    4. "On any person who desires such queer prizes, New York will bestow the gift of loneliness and the gift of privacy."There's the first glorious sentence of the greatest New York book ever written. Yes, the competition is stiff, but this is it. You could underline this entire book, and I very nearly did.I've lived in several cities, and come to the conclusion that they're all more or less alike. As homes for many different people, they must do many different things; there is no room for a city with [...]

    5. Don't tell New Yorkers I said so, but I think I might like this book more than the city itself. Through E.B. White's eyes, NYC is a magical, romantic place. OK, OK--it is in real life too, but his words lend a certain amount of mystique that I haven't quite uncovered in the city itself. (Leave me alone. I'm a Bama girl and I like it.) I read the final pages of this book while sitting under a tree in Central Park, just as it started to rain. What could be better, seriously?!

    6. Every time I read White's gorgeous love letter to New York City, I'm filled with nostalgia for my own town and I tend to wake the next day with a honed sense of observational candor. As many have noted in recent years, his heavy observation of NYC's vulnerability can be read almost as a prophesy of September 11, 2001, though this was written in 1949 when thoughts about the end of World War II and atomic bombs were still abundant:The city, for the first time in its long history, is destructible. [...]

    7. EB White knows how to write. In this short book, he details many aspects of Manhattan. The book was published mid-twentieth century, so many of his observations are now faded memories of a time that was.His recollection of brand and building names, his comments on shows and restaurants, or where to catch a train or hitch your mare, was quite definitely before my time.But because I am a resident of Nuuk, Greenland, I was fascinated by how many people live in that small island. Here, I occasionall [...]

    8. What an amazing love letter to a city this is. This essay has got me pining to go back to New York, to set up shop and live in those cramped quarters with those hellish humid summers and subways (oh NOT to drive!!) And though this was written in 1949, when black people were still acceptably referred to as "Negros" and Prohibition was not so long ago, E.B. White still captures the soul of New York that has remained constant. Reading this book, though it refers to now obsolete neighborhoods that h [...]

    9. A must read for any New Yorker, New York visitor, or lover of the NYC. The dude gets it right, even 50 years later. E.B. White's "Here is New York" is a 56 page/7500 word essay about NY.He begins the essay "On any person who desires such queeer prizes, New York will bestow the gift of lonliness and the gift of privacy." He talks about the fact that you have anonymity in NYC, and can be a hermit, but then are immersed in a concentrated center of cultures/activities/events/people/neighborhoods, th [...]

    10. "Here Is New York" is an essay E.B. White—yes, of Charlotte's Web fame—wrote in 1948 for Holiday, a long-since defunct travel magazine. The essay reads as you would expect up until its last few pages. White is crisp and concise, and, as far as essays go, "Here Is New York" is enjoyable. It's interesting how few surprises there are throughout the essay, whether White is discussing his personal experiences of living in New York or about the tourist's, the outsider's, limited understanding of t [...]

    11. E.B. White's Here Is New York has been described as a 'remarkable, pristine essay', and The New York Times lists it as one of the best ten books ever written about the 'grand metropolis' of the city. White's essay was originally an article written for Holiday magazine; he declined to revise it at all before it was published in book form in 1948. New York is one of my absolute favourite cities, and I have been eager to read White's essay for years; thankfully, my parents bought me a lovely slim h [...]

    12. It's going to be so so so hard to leave this city. I think everyone feels this way when they leave New York. There has to be some sort of bittersweet relief to leave, combined with the knowing of impending, unavoidable nostalgia. I love this book and I am so glad that in 2016 it speaks to the New York experience. How truly perceptive E.B. White was and how well he captured the New York experience. A beautiful experience, both the city and the book.

    13. The introduction (from 1999) and the original essay by White (from 1948) provide an interesting perspective on how much New York City changes, and yet how there are essential elements -- like the interplay between city natives, commuters, and those who move here -- that will never change.There are a few cringe-worthy moments of elitism (like "the Irish are a hard race to tune out" -- really?) that mar this otherwise entertaining essay.[Note: I read this during the 2017 Book Riot "read harder" ch [...]

    14. "There are roughly three New Yorks. There is, first, the New York of the man or woman who was born here, who takes the city for granted and accepts its size and its turbulence as natural and inevitable. Second, there is the New York of the commuter - the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night. Third, there is the New Tork of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something. Of these three trembling cities the greatest is the last - the [...]

    15. Although this book can be appreciated as it stands, it definitely behooves the reader of this exquisite glorified essay to have a working knowledge of the history of New York City, at least since the mid-19th-century days of Walt Whitman, to fully appreciate the in-and-out flow of memories White conveys as he contemplates the contemporary New York of 1949, along with those things about the city which had changed, which had gone, and which qualities seemed timeless and ever-germaine to the place. [...]

    16. White wraps his master level talent around a wide-eyed Manhattan love story. A classic from the 1940’s, “Here is New York,” is well thought and well penned. What was fundamentally true about New York City yesterday, is still true today and will likely be true again in 2040 when this little novella turns 100. Since any town is really a reflection of it’s people, White describes NY as three towns made up of three distinct groups. The first circle is the establishment, it includes those sel [...]

    17. More of a magazine essay than anything else, a super-short contemplation of New York City by EB White, living in the now-long-gone Lafayette Hotel during a summer heatwave, in 1948. A small masterpiece of concision and sense of place.A rare case, too, of the quality and the texture of the prose somehow precisely matching the subject and the period. Portrays the old, massive, nothing-like-it-in-the-world New Deal NYC. Where the old Queen Mary liner announced her arrival to the whole west side wit [...]

    18. I've reread this a couple of times since I moved to New York. Sometimes when I am walking around the city, I'll remember snippets of White's essay. Right now the most applicable part, for me, is his description of those to move to New York from somewhere else: "e city of final destination, the city that is a goal. each embraces New York with the intense excitement of first love, each absorbs New York with the fresh eyes of an adventurer, each generates heat and light to dwarf the Consolidated Ed [...]

    19. In just 58 pages, E.B.White tells the magical tale of the neighborhoods and the "story" of New York City. The essay was written about 50 years ago. With the dynamics of today, some places described in the book are no longer there, but the essence of the city still lives on each page and with each word. I have been lucky enough to live in New York, so "Here is New York" was a little bit of a nostagic journey for me. This "settler" did a little research after readingI had to know a little more abo [...]

    20. "A poem compresses much in a small space and adds music, thus heightening its meaning. The city is like poetry: it compresses all life, all races and breeds, into a small island and adds music and the accompaniment of internal engines. The island of Manhattan is without any doubt the greatest human concentrate on earth, the poem whose magic is comprehensible to millions of permanent residents but whose full meaning will always remain elusive."

    21. I don't know why I had to round up to having finished 75 books, but I did when I realized I was at 74 with two days to go. So I did it. I scoured the shelf to find something short enough and found this. I had read it before, but I loved it yet again. What an excellent way to end the year. And it was interesting having read it right before moving to NYC and only having visited, and then 6 years after I moved here.

    22. A little gem of a book - more of an essay - which conjures up the vibrant, thrusting, cosmopolitan New York of 1949 in wonderfully descriptive language. It feels remarkably contemporary in some of the issues mentioned. It might be the closest I ever get to visiting the city but it was a very evocative little tour.

    23. FAV QUOTES:No one should come to New York to live unless he is willing to be lucky. New York is the concentrate of art and commerce and sport and religion and entertainment and finance, bringing to a single compact arena the gladiator, the evangelist, the promoter, the actor, the trader and the merchant. It carries on its lapel the unexpungeable odor of the long past, so that no matter where you sit in New York you feel the vibrations of great times and tall deeds, of queer people and events and [...]

    24. I loved this essay about New York. White is such an amazing writer- I love his imagery and how he manages to evoke nostalgia for the city and how he really focuses on the unchanging aspects that are present today. EB White rules.

    25. This was such a quick read but it is such a profound nugget to keep on my bookshelf. White summarized and put into words so beautifully many conclusions I myself have discovered while living in New York. He speaks to many aspects of the city; the thrill of being so close to someone influential, the necessity to be understanding and nonjudgmental to everyone you meet, the possibility of always being a part of something -- or not be, the types of people who live/come to live here, the architecture [...]

    26. Beautifully written and brilliant. E.B. White perfectly captures the spirit of New York. Although he provides a disclaimer at the beginning that the reader must make allowances for the fact that the city is always changing, the bulk of this work is as true today as it was the day it was written. Highly recommend.

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