How to Be a Woman Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven t been burned as witches since life isn t exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women They are beset by uncertainties and questions Why ar

  • Title: How to Be a Woman
  • Author: Caitlin Moran
  • ISBN: 9780091940737
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Paperback
  • Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven t been burned as witches since 1727, life isn t exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women They are beset by uncertainties and questions Why are they supposed to get Brazilians Why do bras hurt Why the incessant talk about babies And do men secretly hate them Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations oThough they have the vote and the Pill and haven t been burned as witches since 1727, life isn t exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women They are beset by uncertainties and questions Why are they supposed to get Brazilians Why do bras hurt Why the incessant talk about babies And do men secretly hate them Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women s lives with laugh out loud funny scenes from her own, from adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother.

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    • [PDF] Î Free Read ↠ How to Be a Woman : by Caitlin Moran ↠
      308 Caitlin Moran
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      Posted by:Caitlin Moran
      Published :2018-09-12T00:01:11+00:00

    One thought on “How to Be a Woman”

    1. I think it's pretty safe to say that this book wasn't written for me. Caitlin Moran's columns have always been a bit hit or miss for me but when she's on, she's a witty storyteller with some interesting points to make. She's no groundbreaking pantheon of feminist wisdom, but she's definitely a valuable, and often hilarious, ally. Her book was something I approached with hesitation since several published extracts had left me scratching my head, but with her upcoming scheduled appearance at the E [...]

    2. You know what? Since there are so many four and five star reviews hanging around for this, I will serve a proper review to show why I absolutely could not stand this book. Moran is a sporadically talented writer -- maybe it deserved 2/2.5 stars in the writing stakes. However, I did something I almost never do: I rated this book intellectually. As a memoir, it succeeded (almost) brilliantly -- her recollection of her wedding had me in absolute stitches and makes me laugh every time I reread it (y [...]

    3. iiiiiiii looooooved thiiiiis sooooooo muuuuuuuchhhh omgggggggg.No but really. It's the thing everyone says, but this book is full of so many "omg! i feel that way too!" over and over and over again. I felt so understood and so together with Caitlin Moran and was so thankful to have this collection of frank and honest thoughts on being a lady today. Some people might even use the word "empowering".

    4. 1. I am confounded by the critical response. Confounded.2. The book is indeed very funny and has its charms but this is far more memoir than manifesto and very grounded in a rather singular set of experiences.3. Good humor doesn't elevate common sense wisdom into groundbreaking or important feminist thought.4. Casual racism! More than once! Or twice!5. Birthing babies makes you a woman, you see. But that's followed by a chapter where it's totes okay if you choose not to have a baby.6. People are [...]

    5. If you have even slight feminist beliefs, or if you are a woman who wants your eyes opened, sensibilities shocked, and then laugh your ass off, this is the book. I read Bossypants, which I love, but Caitlin Moran's strong feminist words were so inspiring to me, and just MADE SENSE. I might not have agreed with everything, but I was certainly amused and entertained the whole time. Definitely an auto-biography worth reading, dude or gal! And it's really dirty in parts, she talks about things you N [...]

    6. Much as there is to quibble over a strictly academic handling of feminist thought, if your introduction to feminism began here chances are you will be tempted to think that a jocular disdain for transpeople and tch-tch-ing sympathy for women outside the sphere of Europe and America could be pardoned in the light of light-hearted banter. Caitlin Moran has a chatty, teenager-ishly snippy voice and she made me collapse into a helpless fit of distinctly unflattering, full-blown guffaws more often th [...]

    7. Quite an uneven reading experience, a fault I largely blame on the marketing of this book. How to Be a Woman is touted as basically "Feminism--now with jokes!" And that's a concept that I could get onboard with. I would consider myself a feminist, I would consider myself moderately amusing at times, and I would consider myself a fan of Caitlin Moran's white streak in her wild mane--a bit reminiscent of the 90's version of Rogue. So, yes, let's do this! I want to feel empowered as a woman, I want [...]

    8. Has an appalling case of unpacked privilege. Dropping "tranny" and "retard" in this book is just the tip of her shitty iceberg.Newsflash: feminism that doesn't advocate for ALL women is no better than patriarchy.

    9. Because life is too short to feel guilty about not being a perfect woman. Let’s get real.Caitlin Moran is wicked funny and painfully, awkwardly truthful in this book. Rather than harp on the theoretical implications of modern feminism, Moran skips the arguments and says simply, “Feminism is having a vagina and wanting to be in charge of it.” Ding ding!She manages to address the horrors of childbirth and the joys of parenting, the conundrum of naming of vaginas, and the unnecessary discomfo [...]

    10. I have laughed out loud in too many public places reading this perfect book that ALL women need to read and all men too. My reoccuring thought throughout reading was: It's not just me that thinks this way! In little over 300 pages this book has made my confidence sky rocket.This book takes you by the shoulders and shakes you like a best friend to remind you how important you are being exactly who you are with your saggy, flabby, wrinkly bits included too. Caitlin Moran - I demand MORE!

    11. After following Caitlin Moran on Twitter for a couple of years now I thought it was eventually time to read one of her books. Well, that was one of my better ideas.This can be labelled as a sort of feminist memoir and oh lord, is it good. Moran's witty, truthful, and journalistic prose makes reading this memoir a treat. A big feminist treat. Like Simone de Beauvoir belting a rendition of Beyoncé's Freakum Dress while riding on the back of an all-fours Jeanette Winterson. Her unparalleled attitu [...]

    12. EDITING TO ADD: If you are here to tell me that Moron was just being "funny" or "ironic" or any other word meant to belittle my take on Moron's interview and thus insinuate that I just don't get it and I am pearl clutching:GET THE FUCK OFF MY REVIEW. And go drip your Moron apologia somewhere else. I lived in the UK, I understand Moron's "humour" quite well, and I still think she's a fuckwit poor ass excuse for a female. As are her attack fans. So buh-bye and better luck proselytizing on someone [...]

    13. Feminists have been moaning about why women (and men) hesitate to label themselves as feminists these days. And rightly so. It makes no sense for women (or men) to be nervous about being pro-gender equality. I have a theory about that, which fits with both this book's assertions and many of the negative reviews of it here on . A lot of "traditional" feminists have this reputation for being aggressive, judgmental, and overly serious. Who wants to hang out with someone who is likely to find fault [...]

    14. Everyone--men and women--should read this. I'm a dude and I didn't, like, grow a vagina or anything. So it's safe.

    15. Unfortunately the e-reader I was using at the time has lost all of my notes on this, but I wanted to write something here anyway because I think Caitlin Moran is such an extravagantly gifted writer and I thought this book was a kind of masterpiece of its type.Caitlin is my generation, and her English suburban background and sense of humour are mine, so the laughter when I read her stuff is mingled with a constant astonished recognition of the details, everything from adolescent wanking over The [...]

    16. "When the subject turns to abortion, cosmetic intervention, birth, motherhood, sex, love, work, misogyny, fear, or just how you feel in your own skin, women still often won't tell the truth to each other unless they are very, very drunk." Caitlin Moran is right. Nowadays, you DO have to be drunk. The last time I heard a female friend relate anything even remotely personal was when L. had too much wine at book club and really tore into her deadbeat ex-husband. (Seriously, you earn $98,000 a year [...]

    17. I finished this book over a week ago, but then promptly packed up to go visit my grandmother, and was nowhere near a computer. My grandmother turned 95 on Friday. She's a pretty remarkable woman. There's a story that is told in women's history circles, about the classic assignment to go interview your grandmother, and how everyone comes back, convinced that their grandmother was a "feminist," whether or not their grandmother would have agreed with that assessment. Everyone's grandmother seems to [...]

    18. This is an abridged review. You can read the full thing here. Also, I demoted it by one star because while I was writing the review, I got to further reflect on (and remember!) all the reasons this book pissed me off so much in the first place. It's pretty bad.The thought of this book serving as anyone's introduction to feminism horrifies me.Let's start with Moran's take on a subject near and dear to my heart, women's history:Even the most ardent feminist historiann't conceal that women have bas [...]

    19. I'm never going to read this book, ever. Yes, I may have a lot of privilege, enough that I was able to take an "Introduction to Women's Studies" course last year at my university.But so does frickin' Caitlin Moran.And that does NOT make it okay for her to publish a book MARKETED AS AN INTRODUCTORY GUIDE TO FEMINISM that freely uses hate speech, inserts homophobic remarks, promotes an ableist mentality, and ignores general research to avoid making idiotic generalizations on an individual's sexual [...]

    20. Part memoir, part rant, this is my second Moran read and yet again she's left me feeling inspired and empowered, determined to be just a little bit better at being me.

    21. Two caveats:One: At times, Moran misses the opportunity to connect the feminist needs and experiences of hetero women to the feminist needs and experiences of GLBTQAI, minority communities, and other groups of people to whom the female experience is infinitely parallel.Two: I straight-up disagree with her on at least two major points. But the thing is, her arguments for those two points were not ones I'd heard before. They made me think about issues in genuinely new ways. And I spend a LOT of ti [...]

    22. I remember seeing the cover of this book and wondering: Who is this Caitlin Moran person, and why should I care about her being a woman?Well it turns out she is quite a big deal in the UK, where she wrote a novel at 15, became a music journalist for the weekly Melody Maker at 16 and briefly hosted a Channel 4 pop culture show called Naked City at 18 before embarking on a long career as a TV critic and satirical columnist for The Times.In fact, while visiting the UK last fall, I saw one of her co [...]

    23. Caitlin Moran, you failed me.I mean, it was a good autobiography but if you're reading this for the feminist aspectjust try with something else.The writing style is probably the most annoying thing ever. I have another book by her - a gift, also - and I'm so afraid to read it now, because part of the reason it took me like a week to read this was the writing style. I couldn't bring myself to DNF this because I was interested in most of the things she said but it was so hard to get through the na [...]

    24. Synopsis1913 – Suffragette throws herself under the King’s horse. 1969 – Feminists storm Miss World. NOW – Caitlin Moran rewrites The Female Eunuch from a bar stool and demands to know why pants are getting smaller. There’s never been a better time to be a woman: we have the vote and the Pill, and we haven’t been burnt as witches since 1727. However, a few nagging questions do remain… Why are we supposed to get Brazilians? Should you get Botox? Do men secretly hate us? What should [...]

    25. Hmmm This is a tricky one. Reading around the Internet, I think a lot of people have been disappointed by this book because they weren't familiar with Moran's other work and were expecting it to be a fully-formed feminist manifesto and, having seen a lot of the promotional material for the book, I don't really blame them.This book is a kind of humorous semi-memoir sprinkled with generous helpings of Moran's opinions on what it is to be a woman, which has a feminist slant.A bit of a non-specific [...]

    26. Six months ago, a memoir by a British columnist about feminism would not have caught my eye. Feminism (in this country, anyway) always seemed unnecessary to me, something that had been capably handled by the previous generation and no longer required much thought. This attitude no doubt stemmed from my having spent the majority of my life in progressive liberal communities and primarily self-employed, vaguely aware of that nagging gender pay gap but never having felt personally affected by it.Th [...]

    27. *I won this in the FirstReads giveaway.*I have never read anything by Caitlin Moran or knew that she was a columnist, so I came to this book without an opinion about the author. This is unusual for me. I usually pick up humorous memoirs by people I already consider funny because there is nothing worse than life stories from someone you don’t know that are supposed to be funny, but are really not that funny. It’s like hearing a long, awkward story about a coworker’s uncle. Luckily, Caitlin [...]

    28. As far as I'm concerned, as a 50 something male, Caitlin Moran is preaching to the converted. There's very little in her book that I disagree with. I will encourage my daughter to read it once she is 15 or 16 as I suspect that anyone, and especially females, trying to make sense of the modern world at that sort of age, would find lots of wisdom and insight. Even as (hopefully) a self-aware liberal I gained some insights and new ideas. The book is very enjoyable, particularly those plentiful sect [...]

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