Dude You re a Fag Masculinity and Sexuality in High School High school and the difficult terrain of sexuality and gender identity are brilliantly explored in this smart incisive ethnography Based on eighteen months of fieldwork in a racially diverse working

  • Title: Dude, You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School
  • Author: C.J. Pascoe
  • ISBN: 9780520252301
  • Page: 264
  • Format: Paperback
  • High school and the difficult terrain of sexuality and gender identity are brilliantly explored in this smart, incisive ethnography Based on eighteen months of fieldwork in a racially diverse working class high school, Dude, You re a Fag sheds new light on masculinity both as a field of meaning and as a set of social practices C J Pascoe s unorthodox approach analyzesHigh school and the difficult terrain of sexuality and gender identity are brilliantly explored in this smart, incisive ethnography Based on eighteen months of fieldwork in a racially diverse working class high school, Dude, You re a Fag sheds new light on masculinity both as a field of meaning and as a set of social practices C J Pascoe s unorthodox approach analyzes masculinity as not only a gendered process but also a sexual one She demonstrates how the specter of the fag becomes a disciplinary mechanism for regulating heterosexual as well as homosexual boys and how the fag discourse is as much tied to gender as it is to sexuality.

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    One thought on “Dude, You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School”

    1. After reading a reference to this book in Jessica Valenti's Full Frontal Feminism, I was moved to pick it up out of curiosity about the study of masculinity and gender identity. Maybe my women's college education was just too thorough, or my upbringing in suburban Ohio was just too similar, but I didn't find anything particularly surprising or revealing in Pascoe's book. Based on the subtitle, I was hoping for a book that would speak to the construction of gender identity in high school, and per [...]

    2. (Reviewed for The Gay and Lesbian Review Worldwide)“Cheering students filled River High’s gymnasium. Packed tightly in bleachers, they sang, hollered, and danced to loud hip-hop music. Over their heads hung banners celebrating fifty years of River High’s sports victories. The yearly assembly in which the student body voted for the most popular senior boy in the school to be crowned Mr. Cougar was under way, featuring six candidates performing a series of skits to earn student votes.”Thus [...]

    3. I read this book as part of a Gender Reading Group started by a group of friends after taking a really fun and enlightening Gender Theory course.All I can say is WOW. Sometimes sociology is so crazy because it brings to light things that are so embedded and taken for granted in our society. Reading this book was like going back to my high school. I literally pictured the halls of my school as I read. I really liked her analysis of the word "fag" and how high school boys use this word to insult o [...]

    4. I had the kind of high hopes for "Dude You're a Fag" that were bound to leave me disappointed. It would've been impossible for the author to exhaustively cover absolutely everything I hoped she would about masculinity and sexual identity development in high school in a couple hundred pages. What's left, then, is a nonfiction work that is at times fascinating and at others deeply frustrating with its lack of information.Pascoe sets out to earn her PhD by studying masculinity within the dynamics o [...]

    5. My skepticism about ethnography and sociological methodology aside, I think Pascoe does a fair job of putting her fieldwork observations into conversation with feminist and queer theory. True, much of what she writes will not come as any big surprise to those who are up on teen culture and the use of the terms "gay," "fag," and "faggot" today, but I think her observations about the ways in which teenage boys are homophobic are the more innovative clincher. I sometimes wonder if she dismisses the [...]

    6. Dude You're a Fag: Masculinity and Sexuality in High School (2012), by sociologist C.J. Pascoe, is a discourse on the exploration of schools as a socializing institution for boys concerning the formation of their masculine identities. Pascoe’s discussion was based on the results of 18 months of ethnographic research that took place in a racially diverse middle-class suburban high school in northern California. The goal of her study was to “explain how teenagers, teachers, and the institution [...]

    7. this ethnography was a required text for my anthropology course (gender in cross-cultural perspective). overall i found it to be a highly engaging & informative ethnographic study. (i was simulatenously intrigued & repelled by the title when i saw it in the syllabus !)pascoe studies adolescent masculinity in a california high school in the early 2000s. she is primarily interested in how the construction of masculinity (via school sanctioned rituals like homecoming & disparate session [...]

    8. This is not a light read. Pascoe does hardcore research, resulting in am intensely documented and cited work. It is an excellent text for anyone working in schools or with middle and high school students.Pascoe spent a year and a half in a high school mostly observing boys in a variety of settings. She documents the girls as well, but only how the boys act towards and with them. (She does meet with a group of girls that are lesbians, but only after hearing about them from the boys. I do not know [...]

    9. Dude You're a Fag explores the multifaceted ways in which masculinity and sexuality police the everyday lives of high school adolescents. Of primary significance to the book is how heteronormative practices, such as school dances, performances, and policies, work to reinforce gender and sexuality stereotypes. Pascoe finds that masculinity is not the sole domain of biological males. Rather, it is a set of practices predicated on the notion of dominance that both males and females can utilize to t [...]

    10. Really interesting. I can't wait to reread this one and absorb more of it. Not all of it was entirely surprising, but the observations that Pascoe made were fresh and interesting. Drawing on old-school feminists and adding her own spin, she wove an interesting text. I found the dialogue between the students especially intriguing.My favorite chapter (unsurprisingly) was chapter five, "Look at My Masculinity!" which was focused on masculine girls at River High. To me, this was the most unusual.I a [...]

    11. As other reviews have stated, it didn't provide a tremendous amount of groundbreaking research for any reader with a working knowledge of sociology and gender studies. But it was written accessibly enough (for an academic text) that I think it should be included in lower division gender studies curricula, especially since it illustrates Judith Butler's concept of gender performativity a whole lot more understandably than Butler herself does. For that matter, I think I actually got a firmer grasp [...]

    12. I used this for a gender and sexuality class. Thought-provoking. Students really connected to it, and used it to look at their own experiences in a new and critical way. The author is relentless in her analysis of seemingly innocent practices -- you don't have to agree with all of her conclusions to appreciate the value of her consistency, great for educational purposes. After a few chapters the phrase "compulsory heteronormativity" was second nature to me. And it has stuck with me.

    13. It's good to see that this kind of work is being done. I used part of the text for an interview theatre project with my students and it helped foster some bravery to see that they are not the only high school in the country dealing with these issues. I found the text clear and easily followed. The case study was interesting and it seemed fairly written about.

    14. Extremely repetitive; any one who attended a public high school will find nothing here that they didn't already know; in fact, most of what is written here can be witnessed first hand on any public transit bus in just about any city. The observations were about as juvenile as the teenage jocks need to prove their "masculinity".

    15. A really great read for anyone who works with adolescents to check out--and parents, too! A look at how high schools can be really hostile environments that impress gender norms on students in ways that can be SUPER harmful and inhumane, and at how we can make space for deviation and free expression in our schools, too!

    16. Pascoe's analysis of an American high school is very eye-opening. I feel it points out very important gender-stamping in American high schools, and that school administrations should be aware of the stress they are putting on high school students to remain within traditional gender norms.

    17. Written in 2007, the only positive about more modern masculinity in high school is that sustained physical attacks are no longer common. Kids are more likely to throw things, or punch once; popular kids can't drag the gender non-normative or otherwise lower ranking into the bathroom and kick the shit out of them anymore. Progress! Excepting that, presentations of masculinity in high school are deeply alarming and tightly controlled. "Dude, you're a fag," and similar comments are repeated endless [...]

    18. I came into reading this book with mixed expectations. The author approaches the issue of homophobia and sexism as linked issues stemming from a common problem of hetero-normativity, something that is both refreshing to see but also not really anything terribly groundbreaking. She approaches the young men she studies with a great deal of objectivity and empathy, and never once does she characterize heterosexual boys or boys that identify in a traditionally masculine fashion as being villains or [...]

    19. This book should have been better than it was. I feel that 2.5 stars would have been more appropriate, but I decided to be generous.As an English teacher at a school where machismo (and the homophobia that goes with it) rules, I was very excited to dig into a real discussion about how boys construct and express masculinity. CJ Pascoe fails to deliver any new insight. This book would serve as a decent introduction to the subject and acts as a fair literature review (homegirl has done her research [...]

    20. I lived in an LGBT housing cooperative during my first year of college, and this book was recommended to me by a few housemates (nevermind the provocative title). I never got around to reading it until now.The book has its strengths and weaknesses. Personally, I felt the author's descriptions of homophobia at River High were appropriately nuanced (e.g. LGBT students experience homophobia differently, and some not at all, but it depends on how "successfully [they navigate] masculine approval mech [...]

    21. Thoroughly enjoyed Dude, You're a Fag. It details C.J. Pascoe's year and a half fieldwork in an American high school studying how masculinity is perceived, constructed and used among teenagers. In many ways it seems like an extended academic paper, which isn't necessary bad, as it gives the author time to show the analysis and specific examples illustrating her points. Pascoe takes the reader on a journey of masculinity and abject identity; fag discourse; racialiced masculinities; the role of th [...]

    22. Pascoe's book should be required reading material for educators and administrators in adolescent public schools. While some of the material Pascoe presented was adding on to prior knowledge, I was enlightened (and at many times, enraged) at the additional information she gave. The discussions of masculinity in relation to race as well as the chapter on "girls who act like guys" were both very eye-opening and gave me incentive to research these topics more. However, it was flat-out enraging to se [...]

    23. I'll be back to give a more in depth review but I just wanted readers to know that this is not considered light reading. I thought it would be considering the title but this was an essay written for her PhD in psychology. I agree with the material Pascoe covers but, had it been written to appeal to an audience that has never considered things about masculinity mentioned in this essay instead of those with PhD's or people studying Gender & Sexuality Studies, it would have been much more appea [...]

    24. I mainly wished this book were longer -- in it's ultra-concise format, Pascoe hits every point once, and I often wanted more. Particularly, more of her colorful (and often disturbing) examples from her fieldwork with California high school students. That said, for such a short book, it makes truly substantive contributions to the study of masculinity and sexualities, both in terms of how these constructs are upheld by institutions as well as in interactions.Her chapter on methodology -- buried a [...]

    25. This book is memorable to me for several reasons. Firstly, it reminds me of what turned out to be one of my favorite classes of my undergraduate career, filled with insightful voices and fascinating topics. Secondly, it has to do with gender, which is quite possibly my favorite reading topic of all time (at least for nonfiction). Thirdly, I, like most of my fellow Americans, have an obsession with things that claim to present "reality"; I just choose to seek my doses through ethnographies, rathe [...]

    26. This is an interesting and generally accurate study of masculinity in high school. This case study's incidents are widespread and unfortunately universal to the high school experience. Unfortunately, it's feels too limited in scope. I would have loved to see this study extended to high schools across the country, investigating the similarities and differences between different regions, classes, and races. Also, it's focus is primarily on demonstrating the problem rather that finding any solace, [...]

    27. C.J. Pascoe is a participant observer for one year researching masculinities manifested in adolescence in one "average" California high school. Using feminist and queer theory, Pascoe analyzes her observations in various groups of students and makes generalizations on those groups and individuals, while (mostly) providing one or no examples for those generalizations. With such limited time for observations, Pascoe really has shaky grounds for this ethnography, in which Pascoe employs feminist th [...]

    28. I had to read this for my LGBTQ Issues in Counseling course. I thought it was pretty interesting. I liked how the author was able to take an in depth look at high school customs and cultures, breaking them down in regards to heteronormativity.

    29. This book really misses the mark on female masculinity, assuming that female masculinity is a social construct rather than a natural state of being. The book completely misappropriates Judith Butler's models of perfomativity and misconstrues social construct in an oversimplified manner.

    30. I rate my books based on personal enjoyment, not based on any merit as a textbook or as a book in general.So, I have taken a lot of courses on gender, sexuality, queer theory, race, etc. I am so lucky that I went to a college and a Uni with these classes. Thus, I found the book easy enough to understand. However, I feel like, unless you already habe a handle on the vocabulary of these feminist studies, it can be a lot. It's not a dense book, but it is academic.That being said, I am not sure if t [...]

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